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> Do You Play With Backing Tracks?
Bogdan Radovic
post Dec 18 2012, 01:48 AM
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I was wondering how do you guys practice in relation to usage of metronome or backing tracks.

I find myself using this method :

1. Figuring out the thing I'm going to play (lick, solo, rhythm, exercise) with no metronome at all. Just a note at a time in order to get the understanding for the whole thing I'm supposed to play.

2. As soon as I feel somewhat comfortable with the movements/line - I would start practicing with either metronome or a backing track. I would use metronome usually for really technical stuff like repetitive exercises and grooves that are more complicated in time and that I want to internalize and dissect. I do preffer backing track for everything else - including repetative exercises (as soon as they start feeling more comfortable).

I think practicing with backing tracks is must for good timing and learning how to play with others.
Listening is the main game here : what is the drummer playing? what are the strongs beats? what others are playing?

I hear young (and old) bands where people don't really listen to each other. Groove is of course not there or not ideal and they just don't complement each others playing. I think its only because of this - listening and getting used to practicing with backing tracks.

We tend to sometimes focus too much on what we play that we forget to listen to others - which only makes us ultimately not perform well.





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vonhotch
post Dec 18 2012, 01:52 AM
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That seems like the method that I am using now. I used to never practice with a metronome or backing track or anything, and now I wonder how I could have done without.


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Bogdan Radovic
post Dec 18 2012, 01:57 AM
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One thing to add : I think its more useful to practice with a backing track (Full band arrangement) then with a metronome. BUT - if you are not aware of your overall listening level and groove (playing with backing can sometimes mask it), practicing with a metronome can feel like a wake up call when you figure out you can't really follow it. That is the right time to spend some time with metronome first before going for the backing tracks smile.gif


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Qenzoz
post Dec 18 2012, 02:10 AM
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I usually play over guitar pro file with metronome enabled and I make sure to stomp my foot! And I practice at a slow tempo going up to full tempo and then when I am ready I'll play to the backing track i'll also play to the GMC lesson once in a while to make sure I have it down and not overlooking any minor details here and there (of course easier said than done tongue.gif ).


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azureus
post Dec 18 2012, 09:01 AM
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[quote name='Bogdan Radovic' date='Dec 18 2012, 12:48 AM' post='622755']
I was wondering how do you guys practice in relation to usage of metronome or backing tracks.

I find myself using this method : rolleyes.gif

I ghues ,the same like you!Bogdan
First in litle pieces by it's own,then with a drum track,then with a full backingtrack

















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PosterBoy
post Dec 18 2012, 09:31 AM
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Metronome for timing, backing track to hear things in a musical context. Especially repetitive licks, it's good to hear how they change harmonically over different chords.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Dec 18 2012, 02:58 PM
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I use both methods but I find backing tracks more fan for practicing. I get tired of the metronome sound after some time of practice, and this doesn't happen with backing because I can change the backing.


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Marek Rojewski
post Dec 18 2012, 03:04 PM
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I practice with the metronome till I am able to play along the backing track, than I drop the metronome for that lesson. Sometimes I start using the backingtrack when I am able to play the backingtrack speed + 10 bpm on the metronome, to make it easier.


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steve-rec-freak
post Dec 19 2012, 11:48 AM
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QUOTE (Bogdan Radovic @ Dec 18 2012, 01:57 AM) *
One thing to add : I think its more useful to practice with a backing track (Full band arrangement) then with a metronome. BUT - if you are not aware of your overall listening level and groove (playing with backing can sometimes mask it), practicing with a metronome can feel like a wake up call when you figure out you can't really follow it. That is the right time to spend some time with metronome first before going for the backing tracks smile.gif


This is so true! I recently found out about that biggrin.gif !
I always practiced to a backing track, because it is just more interesting.
Normally the track is in time, and it gives you the feel what you are about to learn right from the spot.

But, especially in case you have repetitive sequences to play, it is very helpfull to at least doublecheck
your playing with a metronome. biggrin.gif

Cheers,

S.
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Todd Simpson
post Dec 20 2012, 12:53 AM
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It's very important for folks to get used to playing with a Metronome, and it really helps once you make the transition to playing with a backing. Some folks really need the click, even when recording a track, they will use the click track inside of Pro Tools/Etc. while tracking.

After several years of playing/recording, you get to the point where you have a click track in your head. I can hear a metronome going even when once isn't present. So when recording in reaper/logic, I never use the built in click track, as I can hear a click in my head no matter what.

So I'd say embrace the metronome until it becomes second nature smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Bogdan Radovic @ Dec 17 2012, 07:48 PM) *
I was wondering how do you guys practice in relation to usage of metronome or backing tracks.

I find myself using this method :

1. Figuring out the thing I'm going to play (lick, solo, rhythm, exercise) with no metronome at all. Just a note at a time in order to get the understanding for the whole thing I'm supposed to play.

2. As soon as I feel somewhat comfortable with the movements/line - I would start practicing with either metronome or a backing track. I would use metronome usually for really technical stuff like repetitive exercises and grooves that are more complicated in time and that I want to internalize and dissect. I do preffer backing track for everything else - including repetative exercises (as soon as they start feeling more comfortable).

I think practicing with backing tracks is must for good timing and learning how to play with others.
Listening is the main game here : what is the drummer playing? what are the strongs beats? what others are playing?

I hear young (and old) bands where people don't really listen to each other. Groove is of course not there or not ideal and they just don't complement each others playing. I think its only because of this - listening and getting used to practicing with backing tracks.

We tend to sometimes focus too much on what we play that we forget to listen to others - which only makes us ultimately not perform well.



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