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> Harmonic And Melodic Minor Modes Names
ConnorGilks
post Jan 4 2013, 04:28 AM
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QUOTE (Andre Nieri @ Jan 3 2013, 04:41 PM) *
Hi mate. This scale is commonly refered as to Phrygian Dominant. I've never seen that Mixolydian (b9 b13) been applied to this scale, although the intervals are the same.


Now, the mixolydian (b13) is the 5th mode of the Melodic Minor scale. This one isn't vastly used, but still a great sounding scale to play.


We refer to it as Mixo (b9 b13) at my school. I do find Phrygian Dominant misleading, but I have to say I also find Mixolydian (b13), Mixolydian (b9 b13) and Mixolydian (b9 #9 b13) easy to mix up as well. Perhaps an alternative name would be better than having another Mixolydian scale.

This post has been edited by ConnorGilks: Jan 4 2013, 04:29 AM


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The Professor
post Jan 8 2013, 09:25 PM
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Very fun mode for 7th chords, with a few names that makes it confusing. There's a system of scale names in the jazz world that compares all HM modes to their related major modes. It's great for learning the HM modes as you just alter any major mode you know by one note and you get the related HM mode.

Here are the names if you want to check them out.

HM 1 = Aeolian #7
HM 2 = Locrian #6
HM 3 = Ionian #5
HM 4 = Dorian #4
HM 5 = Phrygian #3
HM 6 = Lydian #2
HM 7 = Mixolydian #1


There's a similar system for naming MM modes that relates them back to major modes with only one note different between the MM mode and related major mode.

MM 1 = Ionian b3
MM 2 = Dorian b2
MM 3 = Phrygian b1
MM 4 = Lydian b7
MM 5 = Mixolydian b6
MM 6 = Aeolian b5
MM 7 = Locrian b4

Those names don't really describe the chords that they produce, but they help learn the HM and MM modes rather quickly as you can just adjust the 7 major modes by one note to create these other scale systems.

Might be worth checking out.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 9 2013, 11:53 AM
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This looks very interesting smile.gif I had no clue about this system... I have to give it some time and see how it feels smile.gif


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casinostrat
post Jan 9 2013, 10:38 PM
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QUOTE (Matt Warnock Guitar @ Jan 8 2013, 08:25 PM) *
Very fun mode for 7th chords, with a few names that makes it confusing. There's a system of scale names in the jazz world that compares all HM modes to their related major modes. It's great for learning the HM modes as you just alter any major mode you know by one note and you get the related HM mode.

Here are the names if you want to check them out.

HM 1 = Aeolian #7
HM 2 = Locrian #6
HM 3 = Ionian #5
HM 4 = Dorian #4
HM 5 = Phrygian #3
HM 6 = Lydian #2
HM 7 = Mixolydian #1


There's a similar system for naming MM modes that relates them back to major modes with only one note different between the MM mode and related major mode.

MM 1 = Ionian b3
MM 2 = Dorian b2
MM 3 = Phrygian b1
MM 4 = Lydian b7
MM 5 = Mixolydian b6
MM 6 = Aeolian b5
MM 7 = Locrian b4

Those names don't really describe the chords that they produce, but they help learn the HM and MM modes rather quickly as you can just adjust the 7 major modes by one note to create these other scale systems.

Might be worth checking out.

This is Awesome!!!! smile.gif


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The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 04:31 PM
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QUOTE (casinostrat @ Jan 9 2013, 09:38 PM) *
This is Awesome!!!! smile.gif


Yeah, it's great for learning fingerings too. If you know Aeolian, just raise the 7th and you've got 1st mode Harmonic Minor, which makes learning the modes much easier than relearning a new fingering for each scale.


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