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> Sight Reading Exercises, Learn To Sight Read on Guitar and Not be Bored While Learning!
The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 09:36 AM
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Hey Everyone,

As well as know sight reading for guitarists is something we all struggle with during our development.

So I've put together an article on the exercises that really helped me build up my sight reading over the years.

http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/jumpstart...e-sight-reading


Hope they are helpful!

What are some of your favorite ways to build up your sight reading skills?


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 12 2013, 11:00 AM
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I've tried to become proficient at this a few years ago, but I never got the right time to put into it, will give this article a good read though - who knows tongue.gif


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The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 11:02 AM
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Yeah I was lucky to learn piano from a very young age, so when I switched to guitar reading notes was easy for me. But I'm a rare case, so when working with students I have to come up with exercises to help them out that I never had to do. Which is also good for me as it gives me insight into issues of reading that I never really thought about in my own playing.


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klasaine
post Jan 12 2013, 06:46 PM
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All of the stuff in Matts article is spot on. Playing duets or guitar ensemble music - whatever style - is probably the most 'fun' for learning to sight read.

Besides doing all those things at different times in my life these are few books that really helped me.

http://www.amazon.com/Selected-Studies-Cla...y/dp/1423445252

http://www.amazon.com/Niehaus-Basic-Jazz-C...ception+for+sax
(there's 4 levels of these)

http://www.amazon.com/Selected-Studies-Rub...k+flute+studies
(for reading ledger lines)

http://www.amazon.com/Melodic-Rhythms-Guit...leavitt+berklee
*(you'll notice this is the only guitar book I listed - guitar methods for reading are generally poor because they're geared to 'guitar' music - not general music ... which is what you generally read when you're required to sight-read)

And if you're really feeling like a tough guy, this is probably the toughest/advanced sight reading book out there -
http://www.amazon.com/Rhythmical-Articulat...ies+for+singers
(nothing will throw if if you can read this book - seriously)


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The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 07:02 PM
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Those are all great books, very cool stuff.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jan 12 2013, 07:05 PM
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I learnt to read fluently in the conservatory but it's been a long since I don't use it so I'm VERY slow now again. Thanks for sharing the article, I will give it a read!



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The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 07:13 PM
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yeah, I find if I don't read on a regular basis I get rusty. So if I play too much by ear my reading chops suffer, but if I read to much my ears suffer, I can never win! lol


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klasaine
post Jan 12 2013, 07:52 PM
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Yeah, you gotta keep it up.
I also find that writing out parts helps. My own guitar parts or a part for a sax or trumpet player. Or just a guitar lick that you know - write it down in standard notation. It's amazing what you learn about rhythm when you have to write them.
Also, if you can force yourself to stay away from TAB you'll find that you'll get better at reading. Most anything that's available as tablature is also available in standard notation.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 12 2013, 10:41 PM
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Nothing beats the ears though smile.gif I'd rather have a sharp ear than sight read like having a newspaper in front of me. Or both, maybe? laugh.gif


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The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 10:42 PM
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I'm glad I have good ears for a lot of situations. But I've played in a number of reading bands over the years, shows/musicals, big bands, backing up singers etc. And so it was good to be able to sit down and read something on the spot, especially when there was no rehearsal.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 12 2013, 10:50 PM
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QUOTE (Matt Warnock Guitar @ Jan 12 2013, 09:42 PM) *
I'm glad I have good ears for a lot of situations. But I've played in a number of reading bands over the years, shows/musicals, big bands, backing up singers etc. And so it was good to be able to sit down and read something on the spot, especially when there was no rehearsal.


True that! This is where sight reading REALLY comes in handy smile.gif


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The Professor
post Jan 12 2013, 10:51 PM
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yeah, but so do ears too, especially when backing singers who change the keys on the spot. Often easier to just play by ear rather than write it out. Having both would be perfect in a perfect world!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jan 13 2013, 02:26 AM
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QUOTE (Matt Warnock Guitar @ Jan 12 2013, 03:13 PM) *
yeah, I find if I don't read on a regular basis I get rusty. So if I play too much by ear my reading chops suffer, but if I read to much my ears suffer, I can never win! lol



haha yeah, my ears are wining this battle by now...


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ConnorGilks
post Jan 13 2013, 03:16 AM
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Very helpful man, thank you! I've got another great resource for sightreading too. I use to always sightread in open position and high notes would require me climbing up the top two strings, which wasn't inconvenient, but I busted out this site and learned to read within a position, made a massive difference in my sightreading!

http://garywillis.com/pages/lessons/read.html


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klasaine
post Jan 13 2013, 06:45 AM
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Music is an auditory art form so 'having a good ear' should be a given. But reading and your ears don't need to be mutually exclusive. Language is auditory as well but what do we call a guy that can't read or write?


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The Professor
post Jan 13 2013, 10:18 AM
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QUOTE (ConnorGilks @ Jan 13 2013, 02:16 AM) *
Very helpful man, thank you! I've got another great resource for sightreading too. I use to always sightread in open position and high notes would require me climbing up the top two strings, which wasn't inconvenient, but I busted out this site and learned to read within a position, made a massive difference in my sightreading!

http://garywillis.com/pages/lessons/read.html


Cool little program, pretty good for challenging you on your reading!


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ConnorGilks
post Jan 13 2013, 10:22 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 13 2013, 05:45 AM) *
Language is auditory as well but what do we call a guy that can't read or write?


A drummer? tongue.gif Kidding of course. You've got a great point though, connecting your ears to your fingers is invaluable.


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klasaine
post Jan 13 2013, 11:32 PM
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Right, a drummer laugh.gif - kidding too.

For me a lot of it is about 'reality'. The reality that I did not want a day job. And also the (harsh sometimes) reality that I can't write a song like Paul MacCartney and I can't solo like Jim Hendrix. Cest la vie. Reading, knowing a lot of styles (and being able to communicate it all) has afforded me that luxury of not having to get a real job.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 13 2013, 11:33 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 14 2013, 09:14 AM
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Indeed, when you want to be a session player, reading is a must, but I know WAY too many people that put reading in front of being creative and I think that at a certain point in my life, this idea became a major scarecrow for me, so I turned it down just because I was scared i would become like them. I know, silly as hell, but we were all young once, right? laugh.gif


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klasaine
post Jan 14 2013, 05:14 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Jan 14 2013, 08:14 AM) *
Ibut I know WAY too many people that put reading in front of being creative and I think that at a certain point in my life, this idea became a major scarecrow for me,


laugh.gif My experience is just the opposite. I knew a ton of guys and gals that eschewed any reading and theory because they thought it would stifle their creativity. Like you say, we're all young once.

*Though I do read on sessions I would say that I probably read most on what we call out here 'casuals' or 'general business' gigs - shows, society functions, backing up singers at showcases, holiday stuff, etc. Nobody wants to rehearse for that kind of thing (and there's really no time anyway) so it's charted out.



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