Reply to this topicStart new topic
> How Do You Practice Your Scales
PosterBoy
post Feb 4 2013, 12:34 PM
Post #1


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.425
Joined: 26-October 11
From: Galway, Ireland
Member No.: 14.225



Maybe I'm lookng for too much in one go.


But practicing scales up and down pattern by pattern and even in intervallic sequences seems semi pointless, great for alt picking exercise, and muscle memory. I've seen some improvement in my playing via this method but what are some other ideas.

Now My new pc is up and running I can practice over vamps, which might help lock in the harmony aspect into my ear.

Taking two adjacent patterns and moving between them, would help break out of the 'stuck in one pattern' syndrome

Help me create an efficient scale workout that not only helps lock the scales into my brain but helps my ears and musciality when playing


--------------------
Currently Working on

PosterBoy's Modern Riffing with Gabriel

PosterBoy's Bootcamp with Todd



Gear
Tyler Burning Water 2K
Burny RLG90 with BK Emeralds
Fender US Tele with BK Piledrivers
Axe Fx Ultra - GCP Pro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
The Professor
post Feb 4 2013, 12:41 PM
Post #2


Theory Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 888
Joined: 8-January 13
From: Manchester UK
Member No.: 17.394



I like to use a two-step approach to working on scales, one to build technique, and one to build soloing chops.

For technique, I agree, using a vamp is a great way to work on learning the scales, but at the same time hearing them in context.

So if I am working a scale pattern, I use a vamp instead of a metronome a lot of the time, and take it different tempos and different keys with the backing track so I can hear how the pattern sounds over given chords.

I also like to do the same thing, but rather than working on technique, I use vamps or chord progressions at different tempos and keys to work on my soloing chops.

So, I would pick a scale shape I wanted to work on, maybe one-octave or two-octave, and even a pattern like ascending thirds to focus on. Then, I put the backing track on and I solo using only that scale shape and only the pattern I want to focus on.

This allows me to again hear the scale in context, work on one shape and/or scale pattern at a time, while improving my soloing chops all at once.

So I split things into technique and soloing, but from there I use backing tracks for both in order to get them in context as I work them out in the practice room.


--------------------
Ask me anything on the theory board. Follow my theory course. Check out my personal site
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jonas Tamas
post Feb 4 2013, 01:34 PM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 243
Joined: 30-January 13
From: Budapest, Hungary
Member No.: 17.594



As you mentioned, it is really important to "break out" from scale boxes. Memorized shapes are good things, but these are just like a firewall on a PC - it just runs in the background. Or as Guthrie Govan said: you have to command the music where to go next, and not the scale has to command you where to go.

I'd suggest you a lot of horizontal movement on the neck, in order to break out from the boxes. And be sure to determine the exact note you are playing at the moment. It's also important to know your actual note's interval from the root in any given moment, because you can dial in different moods consciously using different scale notes. The root has a "home" feel, the 2nd has a more airy, open sound, etc.

QUOTE (The Professor @ Feb 4 2013, 11:41 AM) *
I like to use a two-step approach to working on scales, one to build technique, and one to build soloing chops.

For technique, I agree, using a vamp is a great way to work on learning the scales, but at the same time hearing them in context.

So if I am working a scale pattern, I use a vamp instead of a metronome a lot of the time, and take it different tempos and different keys with the backing track so I can hear how the pattern sounds over given chords.

I also like to do the same thing, but rather than working on technique, I use vamps or chord progressions at different tempos and keys to work on my soloing chops.

So, I would pick a scale shape I wanted to work on, maybe one-octave or two-octave, and even a pattern like ascending thirds to focus on. Then, I put the backing track on and I solo using only that scale shape and only the pattern I want to focus on.

This allows me to again hear the scale in context, work on one shape and/or scale pattern at a time, while improving my soloing chops all at once.

So I split things into technique and soloing, but from there I use backing tracks for both in order to get them in context as I work them out in the practice room.



That's a great method!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bleez
post Feb 4 2013, 01:56 PM
Post #4


Experienced Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.957
Joined: 4-November 11
From: Scotland
Member No.: 14.292



what's a 'vamp'? unsure.gif


--------------------


You say 'minor pentatonic ' like it's a bad thing
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PosterBoy
post Feb 4 2013, 02:02 PM
Post #5


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.425
Joined: 26-October 11
From: Galway, Ireland
Member No.: 14.225



Just an accompaniment. So a one chord vamp would just be a continuous one chord rhythm


--------------------
Currently Working on

PosterBoy's Modern Riffing with Gabriel

PosterBoy's Bootcamp with Todd



Gear
Tyler Burning Water 2K
Burny RLG90 with BK Emeralds
Fender US Tele with BK Piledrivers
Axe Fx Ultra - GCP Pro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
timrobwall
post Feb 4 2013, 03:15 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 65
Joined: 9-January 10
Member No.: 9.092



QUOTE (The Professor @ Feb 4 2013, 11:41 AM) *
I like to use a two-step approach to working on scales, one to build technique, and one to build soloing chops.

For technique, I agree, using a vamp is a great way to work on learning the scales, but at the same time hearing them in context.

So if I am working a scale pattern, I use a vamp instead of a metronome a lot of the time, and take it different tempos and different keys with the backing track so I can hear how the pattern sounds over given chords.

I also like to do the same thing, but rather than working on technique, I use vamps or chord progressions at different tempos and keys to work on my soloing chops.

So, I would pick a scale shape I wanted to work on, maybe one-octave or two-octave, and even a pattern like ascending thirds to focus on. Then, I put the backing track on and I solo using only that scale shape and only the pattern I want to focus on.

This allows me to again hear the scale in context, work on one shape and/or scale pattern at a time, while improving my soloing chops all at once.

So I split things into technique and soloing, but from there I use backing tracks for both in order to get them in context as I work them out in the practice room.


Not sure I completely follow:

When you are practicing technique over chord vamps, are you just running up and down scale patterns -- thirds, bursts of 4, triplets, etc. maybe varying the tempo and rhythm, but essentially just running through variations of scale patterns (in other words, not really making music)? And are you just working with a one chord vamp, or are you using a I IV V blues form, for example?

Thanks. This is a helpful topic.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
The Professor
post Feb 4 2013, 03:25 PM
Post #7


Theory Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 888
Joined: 8-January 13
From: Manchester UK
Member No.: 17.394



No problem.

If I am working on the technical side of things it could be either approach.

If I want to focus on a new scale fingering, or a pattern through a scale, I might do something like this.

1. Choose the scale, say G Melodic Minor
2. Work out the fingering I want to work on
3. Grab a pattern, say triads through the scale
4. Put on a GmMaj7 vamp and run through the pattern at various tempos
5. Repeat the above in 12 keys across the neck


Or, I might take scales and run them through a tune, like this.

1. Pick a tune, say I-IV-V Blues in A
2. Pick a mode to work out, say Lydian Dominant over each chord
3. Find a pattern to work on, say 3rds
4. Put on an A Blues backing track and practice playing the scales in thirds for each chord in the progression
5. Repeat the above in 12 keys


So it is a technical exercise, learning scale fingerings, working on speed and patterns, but done with chords playing in the background rather than just a metronome.

Then, I could repeat the above exercises, but instead of running up and down the scales from a technical standpoint, I would improvise over those progressions, using those scales and patterns as the basis for my solos.

Hope that helps clear things up.


--------------------
Ask me anything on the theory board. Follow my theory course. Check out my personal site
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
timrobwall
post Feb 4 2013, 03:51 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 65
Joined: 9-January 10
Member No.: 9.092



QUOTE (The Professor @ Feb 4 2013, 02:25 PM) *
No problem.

If I am working on the technical side of things it could be either approach.

If I want to focus on a new scale fingering, or a pattern through a scale, I might do something like this.

1. Choose the scale, say G Melodic Minor
2. Work out the fingering I want to work on
3. Grab a pattern, say triads through the scale
4. Put on a GmMaj7 vamp and run through the pattern at various tempos
5. Repeat the above in 12 keys across the neck


Or, I might take scales and run them through a tune, like this.

1. Pick a tune, say I-IV-V Blues in A
2. Pick a mode to work out, say Lydian Dominant over each chord
3. Find a pattern to work on, say 3rds
4. Put on an A Blues backing track and practice playing the scales in thirds for each chord in the progression
5. Repeat the above in 12 keys


So it is a technical exercise, learning scale fingerings, working on speed and patterns, but done with chords playing in the background rather than just a metronome.

Then, I could repeat the above exercises, but instead of running up and down the scales from a technical standpoint, I would improvise over those progressions, using those scales and patterns as the basis for my solos.

Hope that helps clear things up.

Perfect! Thanks so much.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
The Professor
post Feb 4 2013, 03:54 PM
Post #9


Theory Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 888
Joined: 8-January 13
From: Manchester UK
Member No.: 17.394



No problem!


--------------------
Ask me anything on the theory board. Follow my theory course. Check out my personal site
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Feb 4 2013, 06:15 PM
Post #10


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.738
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



All the suggestions above are great and some are or all of those things are what is done by good musicians who play 'solos' and or technically demanding music.

But you've also sort of answered your own question ...
QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Feb 4 2013, 11:34 AM) *
practicing scales up and down pattern by pattern and even in intervallic sequences seems semi pointless, great for alt picking exercise, and muscle memory. *I've seen some improvement in my playing via this method* but what are some other ideas.


In the area of technique, whether it be playing melodic material quickly or grabbing big, stretchy chord voicings - it's all about 'working out'. Practicing exercises and fundamentals. The process isn't always the most exciting but it's the reward you need to keep your eye on. That reward is 'can you pull off that super gnarly lick at any given moment in a live situation?' Making 'music' out of a scale or exercise is your job to do. A scale is a beautiful thing - when played as if it's music. A symphony wind or string player is amazingly passionate when they practice scales. Scales are what PART of music comes from.
Record yourself practicing once a month - both playing exercises and jamming to a track.
Don't listen to it. Archive it.
Repeat process the next month (don't listen - archive).
Do this for like 5 months.
Then listen back starting with the first months recording. The 'timeline' results should be elucidating.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 4 2013, 06:18 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
David.C.Bond
post Feb 5 2013, 12:55 PM
Post #11


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 442
Joined: 1-December 07
From: Leeds, UK.
Member No.: 3.415



I practice resolving scales a lot, for example pracing starting a line from every degree of a mixolydian mode, resolving to its major scale destination.

Also, I take a long list of chromatic notes, and practice acsending one key, and descending the next, using whatever scale I'm working on at the time.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd March 2017 - 11:11 PM