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> Guitar Parable, A short metaphor for our own guitar journey
Quantum
post Feb 10 2013, 11:44 AM
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Hey, guys! : )

This week I started choosing which lessons to cover at GMC
and I ended up pretty frustrated, having to deal with almost 3000 of them.
Later an idea came to my mind to write down a short story, which
really gave me peace over the fact that I have a lot more to do. (Which is actually great, isn't it? tongue.gif)

Every guitarist starts his journey from the base of the GMC ( The Grand Music Cliffs).
The task is to reach YOUR OWN peak and build a statue of yourself, thus becoming a Guitar Hero.
There are many different steepy ways that lead to the peaks. These pathways are called
Classical, Rock, Blues, Jazz and so on... You get the idea.
In order to build your own statue (let's say it'll be blue) on the top of a mountain, you should collect enough blue
stones and gems. (These are the lessons.)
If you start to wonder around and pick up every beautiful stone you find, it'll slow you down.
"Oh, this gem here's green, but it's marvelous, so I'll take it, too." The more stones you pick up,
the heavier your bag gets. Eventually, you won't be able to progress at all, because you have
so much baggage with you. You'd never reach your peak.

Now, there's another thing, that really got me thinking. I used to play classical guitar, as my mother
is a guitar teacher. Later I had to leave it aside, because I prefer mainly rock, blues and jazz music,
so I felt guilty about it. Then I made up the next part of the parable:

It's a fact, that every pathway can take you up into the mountains, but some of them can do it more
quicker than others. The Classical way is a WIDE road, which leads up. You collect many valuable
stones and gems (skills) while walking on it, but actually, it's connected to the other ones. So, one
can always take another route and proceed to his own peak, without feeling guilty of leaving the
main road. Why? Because it wouldn't lead him to his final destination. The positive side is that
the guitarist gets many useful skills from the first part of his journey though.

Another thing I pondered on is that many guitarists actually look upon the great statues, that
are already built on the different mountain peaks. Such are the statues of Yngwie Malmsteen,
Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, BB King and so on. And they start making their way to these peaks,
instead of heading for their own. So, eventually what happens is, they arrive at the peak
with all these great skills and licks and guess what! - There's already a statue built there.
They don't get much of a recognition, because they didn't manage to do something unique
from their own soul.

Hope you like it and please share some thoughts.
We could write it further... smile.gif
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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 11 2013, 10:22 AM
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I'm so glad you posted this here Dian smile.gif I think you have a very clear vision on The Path for every musician striving to discover his own personality. Great parable!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 11 2013, 02:45 PM
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Hi quantum! This is a very cool philosophy! I understand the feeling of having a lot of lessons and stuff there to choose, it become very difficult to decide! That's why GMC mentoring programs are so useful! But this thinking is really effective and inspiring. smile.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Feb 12 2013, 11:01 AM
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I think that's a very good metaphor, Dian and very close to my own way of looking at things. I think you described it perfectly and there's no need to alter it smile.gif

One thing I would like to draw attention to is when you say about only picking up the stones you need instead of everything you see. I've often tried to explain the idea of only devoting your energy to that which interests you, rather than spreading yourself thinly and trying to acquire skills or knowledge just because you think that's what you should be doing.

We should always remember that the greats became great by following their own desires, not by trying to be a jack of all trades. Your sound lies within you. Can you be focused enough to ignore all temptations and distractions and keep digging and digging until you find your own greatness ?


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 12 2013, 12:00 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 12 2013, 07:01 AM) *
I think that's a very good metaphor, Dian and very close to my own way of looking at things. I think you described it perfectly and there's no need to alter it smile.gif

One thing I would like to draw attention to is when you say about only picking up the stones you need instead of everything you see. I've often tried to explain the idea of only devoting your energy to that which interests you, rather than spreading yourself thinly and trying to acquire skills or knowledge just because you think that's what you should be doing.

We should always remember that the greats became great by following their own desires, not by trying to be a jack of all trades. Your sound lies within you. Can you be focused enough to ignore all temptations and distractions and keep digging and digging until you find your own greatness ?



Nice addition mate! I'm getting more and more interested in Zen culture and Taoism. I already read Zen Guitar, do you have any other good books to recommend?


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Ben Higgins
post Feb 12 2013, 03:17 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Feb 12 2013, 11:00 AM) *
Nice addition mate! I'm getting more and more interested in Zen culture and Taoism. I already read Zen Guitar, do you have any other good books to recommend?


By the same author of Zen Guitar is Zen 24/7, which is a shorter, more digestable book. More of a lighter read but really cool .

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu is a very famous book that is worth reading smile.gif


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vonhotch
post Feb 12 2013, 03:47 PM
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I like the many roads can lead to the same destination thinking. Good story Quantum. It's good to have a philosophy behind what you are doing and not just wander around aimlessly, so to speak. smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 13 2013, 08:33 AM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 12 2013, 02:17 PM) *
By the same author of Zen Guitar is Zen 24/7, which is a shorter, more digestable book. More of a lighter read but really cool .

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu is a very famous book that is worth reading smile.gif


Thanks for the recommendations Ben biggrin.gif I finished Zen Guitar a while ago and I found it a great book to be smile.gif

I found this, if anybody else is interested in having a look over Lao Tzu's book:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/taote.htm

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Feb 13 2013, 08:33 AM


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klasaine
post Feb 13 2013, 09:08 AM
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Zen in the Art of Archery (this and the Lao Tzu are what most of the popular Zen and ... books are based on)
The Artists Way - Julia Cameron (originally for writers but applies to musicians perfectly)
Effortless Mastery - Kenny Werner (essentially a guide on how to practice and perform confidently, purposefully and relaxed - great friggin' book - highly recommended!)

I too studied classical guitar in college and then 'left it behind' only to realize that I use it's underly techniques ALL THE TIME.

My addition to the parable - and this is a personal one - is that many times I was coerced/encouraged to turn over stones I never would have on my own. Most times those stones have altered my personal path for the best.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 13 2013, 02:50 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 12 2013, 11:17 AM) *
By the same author of Zen Guitar is Zen 24/7, which is a shorter, more digestable book. More of a lighter read but really cool .

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu is a very famous book that is worth reading smile.gif


Great! Thanks mate. wink.gif


QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 13 2013, 04:33 AM) *
Thanks for the recommendations Ben biggrin.gif I finished Zen Guitar a while ago and I found it a great book to be smile.gif

I found this, if anybody else is interested in having a look over Lao Tzu's book:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/taote.htm


Thanks Cosmin, I will read this one later today.

QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 13 2013, 05:08 AM) *
Zen in the Art of Archery (this and the Lao Tzu are what most of the popular Zen and ... books are based on)
The Artists Way - Julia Cameron (originally for writers but applies to musicians perfectly)
Effortless Mastery - Kenny Werner (essentially a guide on how to practice and perform confidently, purposefully and relaxed - great friggin' book - highly recommended!)

I too studied classical guitar in college and then 'left it behind' only to realize that I use it's underly techniques ALL THE TIME.

My addition to the parable - and this is a personal one - is that many times I was coerced/encouraged to turn over stones I never would have on my own. Most times those stones have altered my personal path for the best.


Thanks for the recommendations mate. I have read "The Artist Way" at the University and It's a great book.


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Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
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