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> 12 Inch Wide Chords? No Problem!, with TAB and mp3
Jonas Tamas
post Feb 13 2013, 08:46 AM
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While playing chords, the left hand's fingers have a limited radius of action – we often bump into this annoying phenomenon, for example the pinky should reach a distant fret as you're trying to form a complex chord. There are two solutions for this problem. The first method was widely used in the middle ages, resulting in fingers a good deal longer than they were before. However, if we'd like to avoid the subtle techniques of the inquisition, we can call upon our right hand's services instead.

In the sound file you can hear a special chord sequence, where all chords have the note C (8th fret on the high E string) as their highest note. As you can see in the tablature, there will be moments, where you should grab simultaneously the first fret on the B-string and the note C mentioned above, i.e. you should master a seven-fret stretch, which is impossible using only the left hand. (I mean, there is yet another resort to solve this challenge: this vehicle is used at roadworks, for rolling down hot asphalt...)

It is a more amicable solution to anchor the right hand's index finger on the 8th fret of the high E-string. The second, third and fourth finger of the right hand can lean against the rear side of the neck, approximately at the 10-12. frets. (You can leave out this propping if it feels more comfortable that way.) In other words, the right hand should visualize a shape as if you would show a '2' to someone. The picking is carried out by the thumb of the right hand, with an upward movement (from lower to higher strings).

The chord sequence is four bars long. In the chord of the first bar, there are solely F and C notes, so we can name it an F5/C or a Csus4 chord (without the fifth). In the second bar, we get a C7sus4 chord after replacing the left hand's third finger. In the third bar, there is a Bbsus9 chord, while in the fourth bar we finish off on an F/A chord.

After that, the chord sequence starts again, with the exception that in the eighth bar we will use a Dbmaj7sus9 chord instead of the F/A. You may expect a more exotic sound here, as you can gather this from its longer name. This chord sort of 'opens' the ending of the chord sequence, as it stops a minor second above the root of the sequence. This chord is easy to execute: simply slide the previous chord shape (Bbsus9) a minor third higher with the left hand. (The right hand's index finger, which is still anchored on the 8th fret, is responsible for the maj7 interval - C on the top of the Db.)

http://soundcloud.com/jonas-tamas-guitar/12-inch-wide-chords

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Attached File  12_inch_wide_chords.mp3 ( 281.63K ) Number of downloads: 33
 


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DeGroot
post Feb 13 2013, 07:20 PM
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Excellent approach to play these "out of reach" chords. These exotic chords sound great and are easy to apply with this technique. Thanks!


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Jonas Tamas
post Feb 13 2013, 10:34 PM
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QUOTE (DeGroot @ Feb 13 2013, 07:20 PM) *
Excellent approach to play these "out of reach" chords. These exotic chords sound great and are easy to apply with this technique. Thanks!


Thanks for checking out these unusual chords, Joe! I'm glad you like them! smile.gif


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