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> Horizontal Vibrato - With Tab And Mp3, (easy technique, even for beginner and intermediate leveles)
Jonas Tamas
post Feb 14 2013, 09:46 AM
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This a very useful and easy techniqe, used by a lot of players nowadays. The first guitarists to apply this were probably George Lynch and Greg Howe.


The technique can be described in 3 points:


1) When you play a longer note then let the note ring for ca. one second, then start sliding up and down for a few times.


2) This horizontal movement must be really loose, so don't aim for any given note while sliding - just move your finger up and down the neck.


3) After a few up and down movements, let the note "disappear" by lifting your finger. (Optional: you can do this while sliding down a few frets.)



Example:

http://soundcloud.com/jonas-tamas-guitar/horizontal-vibrato


TAB of the example:

Attached Image


You can see me using a horizontal vibrato at 0:51 in this video:





I hope you'll like this easy trick!
Let me know if you have any questions, regarding this topic or any other technique!
Attached File(s)
Attached File  V__zszintes_vibrato.mp3 ( 72.25K ) Number of downloads: 40
 


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HungryForHeaven
post Feb 14 2013, 10:46 AM
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Nice technique!

Could be worth adding that this glissando type move is not the only way of vibrating parallel to the string. Instead of sliding the finger across the frets, one could keep the string pressed down and slightly move the finger back and forth in the direction of the string but stay at the same fret (i.e. between the same two frets), that way increasing or decreasing the tension in the string, causing a vibrato effect. This is sometimes called classical vibrato (e.g. Ben Higgins calls it that), I'm guessing because it is very similar to the vibrato technique used by violinists or cellists.
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Jonas Tamas
post Feb 14 2013, 10:51 AM
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QUOTE (HungryForHeaven @ Feb 14 2013, 10:46 AM) *
Nice technique!

Could be worth adding that this glissando type move is not the only way of vibrating parallel to the string. Instead of sliding the finger across the frets, one could keep the string pressed down and slightly move the finger back and forth in the direction of the string but stay at the same fret (i.e. between the same two frets), that way increasing or decreasing the tension in the string, causing a vibrato effect. This is sometimes called classical vibrato (e.g. Ben Higgins calls it that), I'm guessing because it is very similar to the vibrato technique used by violinists or cellists.



Yes, I like the 'violin-type' vibrato, too. Usually it has the most effect with slow songs, when the guitar really has to sing.

Another variant is the 'circular-type' vibrato, used by Steve Vai. It is similar to the violin version you've described, but a circular movement of the pressing string is added. A great visual effect, because it looks really cool:)


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