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> Clean Guitar Chord Changes
Qenzoz
post Mar 20 2013, 03:39 PM
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Hello everyone! On Monday I am going to record a song 'Hey You' by Pink Floyd, now the intro is probably hardest part of this song, basically I am just finger picking an Em chord over 2 bars and then an Dm chord over 2 bars - 4 times.

But the hard part is changing from the chords without getting those annoying slide sounds and all those weird things, the only thing I am using is a clean tone + a bit of phaser.

So I was just wondering if anyone has some great tips, or maybe knows a good video that explains it or something like that smile.gif

Huge thanks in advance!

Cheers,
Tobias

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Here is the song (it's the intro part)


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Qenzoz
post Mar 20 2013, 05:15 PM
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I think I might have found an solution!

I've changed the pattern around a bit, so the Em is now, seems to work better, and I am not doing a full barre on the Dm, just barring the e & B string, so I'll practice that for a bit and hopefully that works! smile.gif , and I think the reason this is much better is because that the low strings D & A gives that horrible sliding sound, well much easier than the G, B & e string does smile.gif

But if anyone still has some tips & tricks that'll be much appreciated could definitely use some to pimp up my playing to get a bit cleaner, especially when it comes to things like this! smile.gif

CODE
e: 2      3     3
B:      5   5     5
G:   4        4



Cheers,
Tobias


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Mar 20 2013, 05:30 PM
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This song is beautiful. I understand what you mean and this is something natural that happens when you are playing clean chords. Sometimes this effect is more notorious because of the sound, the eq or the level of compression that you are using. If you want to minimize this issue is to change chords you could try to avoid sliding, doing a fast and short jump from chord to chord. You can also use EQ to make the slides less notorious.


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Qenzoz
post Mar 20 2013, 05:33 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Mar 20 2013, 05:30 PM) *
This song is beautiful. I understand what you mean and this is something natural that happens when you are playing clean chords. Sometimes this effect is more notorious because of the sound, the eq or the level of compression that you are using. If you want to minimize this issue is to change chords you could try to avoid sliding, doing a fast and short jump from chord to chord. You can also use EQ to make the slides less notorious.


Hey thanks for the advice, trying out the fast jump thing, I find it pretty easy to accidentally make some sort of pull off on the string I am jumping off from, but I do like the idea it seems a lot easier to get it clean, so maybe with some practice I can avoid the pull off thingies smile.gif

Thanks a ton! smile.gif


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Qenzoz
post Mar 24 2013, 01:32 AM
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So I've been watching a good amount of covers of this song and no-one can get the intro 100% clean as the record, except some covers where they have their guitars in Nashville tuning, so I went on to Google and searched for Nashville tuning and Pink Floyd Hey You Nashville Tuning, then someone said something about high strung Nashville tuning.

And on Wikipedia it said this

QUOTE ("Quote from Wikipedia")
Nashville or high strung tuning refers to the practice of replacing the wound E, A, D and G strings on a six-string guitar with lighter gauge strings to allow tuning an octave higher than standard. This is usually achieved by using one string from each of the six courses of a twelve string set, using the higher string for those courses tuned in octaves.
The Pink Floyd song "Hey You" from the album The Wall and the Kansas song "Dust in the Wind" from the album Point of Know Return are notable for using this form of guitar tuning[citation needed]. In "Hey You" David Gilmour actually replaced the low E string with a second high E (not a 12 string set low E octave) such that it was actually 2 octaves up. The Rolling Stones' "Wild Horses" also features both a 12-string guitar played by Keith Richards and a guitar with Nashville Tuning played by Mick Taylor.


Anyways I hope that someone can explain to me what I exactly can do, as far as I know I need to change the gauge of my strings and replace the low e with the high e, but not sure exactly what gauge I should go for, hmm.. So yeah if anyone knows anything about this Nashville tuning, I could use your advice!

Thanks in advance & cheers!

Tobias


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Cosmin Lupu
post Mar 25 2013, 10:23 AM
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Tobias! Hey buddy smile.gif I never even heard about this, but my advice would be to contact an experimented luthier who can tell you a thing or two about how to set up your guitar in the optimal way for such a project. How are those chord shifts coming along so far? smile.gif


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Sensible Jones
post Mar 25 2013, 03:02 PM
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QUOTE (Qenzoz @ Mar 24 2013, 12:32 AM) *
Anyways I hope that someone can explain to me what I exactly can do, as far as I know I need to change the gauge of my strings and replace the low e with the high e, but not sure exactly what gauge I should go for, hmm.. So yeah if anyone knows anything about this Nashville tuning, I could use your advice!

Thanks in advance & cheers!

Tobias

Hi Tobias,
The easiest way to explain Nashville Tuning is this:-
Your lower E, A, D and G strings get tuned an octave higher than concert pitch whilst the top B and E strings stay tuned to their normal pitch. Obviously this can't be done with a set of normal gauge strings so the easiest way around this is to buy a 12 string set and use to high octave strings for your E, A, D and G.
You can buy 'Nashville Tuning' sets of strings if you look around for them.
D'addario produce a set with the following gauges (from low E to high e) 27, 18, 12, 09, 14, 10.
If you use a set of 12 string octaves you'll have something like:- E .030w A .020 D .014 G .010 B .016 E .012

Here's 'Hey You' in Nashville Tuning:-


Hope this helps you mate!!
biggrin.gif


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Qenzoz
post Mar 25 2013, 05:32 PM
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We've (I've laugh.gif) decided to change it around a bit, since it also annoys me if the track in the studio is great but when we go play live it just isn't the same, and I also want the piano to have more of the part since I get a solo laugh.gif but we've already got the piano recorded and I think it just sounds a bit weird with the guitar over it.. Like there was too many things going on.. - It gave it some kind of very vibe.

But I am going to see if I can get all the guitar recorded tomorrow, plus I'd like to make it my own (I'm not David Gilmour) and I really don't want to record more than 2 guitars (one clean & one distorted lead), since I don't want a major change when I have to play it live - I hate it when bands sounds totally different live than they did on their CD....

Anyways! I'll even try and get a guitar cover down over the backing track! Since getting these changes down would be very nice! But it seriously is a hard song for me to play, loads of chords and feels like it is just the same thing for 2 minutes, so easy to make an mistake and I feel unfocused easily after awhile since it is just the same over and over again and then I tend to play it faster to keep my self awake laugh.gif, bleeh biggrin.gif.
But the changes are coming along a lot better, now I have a new change I need to isolate from the chorus to the bridge Bm (barré around 7th fret) to open Dsus2. Hopefully I can get it down good soon..

And yeah I found out about this Nashville, tried it on my Fender strat, but the g string broke and I used an high e 0.10 for the low E as David Gilmour did, it definitely wasn't setup for this (probably should have contacted a luthier or at least have gotten the right string laugh.gif - but I'll just try and get it down the standard E tuning way, that'll also be a good work out.

Anyways thanks for the information and the help, and sorry if my text seems confusing, haven't slept that much this night, have a nice headache and just waiting for the clock to be around 19:00 or 20:00 so I can go to bed, sleep well and be all rested for recording tomorrow, hmm.. tongue.gif

Tobias

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Mar 25 2013, 10:23 AM) *
Tobias! Hey buddy smile.gif I never even heard about this, but my advice would be to contact an experimented luthier who can tell you a thing or two about how to set up your guitar in the optimal way for such a project. How are those chord shifts coming along so far? smile.gif


QUOTE (Sensible Jones @ Mar 25 2013, 03:02 PM) *
Hi Tobias,
The easiest way to explain Nashville Tuning is this:-
Your lower E, A, D and G strings get tuned an octave higher than concert pitch whilst the top B and E strings stay tuned to their normal pitch. Obviously this can't be done with a set of normal gauge strings so the easiest way around this is to buy a 12 string set and use to high octave strings for your E, A, D and G.
You can buy 'Nashville Tuning' sets of strings if you look around for them.
D'addario produce a set with the following gauges (from low E to high e) 27, 18, 12, 09, 14, 10.
If you use a set of 12 string octaves you'll have something like:- E .030w A .020 D .014 G .010 B .016 E .012

Here's 'Hey You' in Nashville Tuning:-


Hope this helps you mate!!
biggrin.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Mar 26 2013, 11:19 AM
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Good luck mate smile.gif Keep us updated wink.gif


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