Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Getting More Out Of My Marshall Amp
Saddlefall
post May 2 2013, 08:05 AM
Post #1


Learning Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 127
Joined: 28-December 11
From: Norway
Member No.: 14.711



Hi everyone!
I'm using a Marshall JDM1 2x12 combo amp, and i'm very happy with how it sounds on it's own with no effect pedals etc. But recently since I've joined a band and begun jamming with some friends, with drums, bass, vocals and another guitar it sounds a little thin..

So is there any booster pedal, og tube screamer or something I can use to get a more powerful sound?


--------------------
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Explorer
Jackson Warrior WRXT
Jackson RR24
Schecter Demon 7 string

Amp:
Marshall JMD:1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PosterBoy
post May 2 2013, 08:20 AM
Post #2


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.385
Joined: 26-October 11
From: Galway, Ireland
Member No.: 14.225



A lot of people use a tube screamer with the drive set a minimum and use the level control to boost the front end of the amp. It helps to give a tighter bass response from the amp and should help beef up your sound. Then you can probably bring your gain on the amp down a little, as too much gain will thin out your sound.


--------------------
Currently Working on

PosterBoy's Modern Riffing with Gabriel

PosterBoy's Bootcamp with Todd



Gear
Tyler Burning Water 2K
Burny RLG90 with BK Emeralds
Fender US Tele with BK Piledrivers
Axe Fx Ultra - GCP Pro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
korblitz
post May 2 2013, 08:41 AM
Post #3


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 397
Joined: 16-August 12
Member No.: 16.462



love the sound of the Xotic AC Booster pedal
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Darius Wave
post May 2 2013, 09:15 AM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 5.217
Joined: 29-November 12
From: Poland
Member No.: 17.069



I'm afraid the thing You consider as "thin" sound is rather not a matter of input but of the amp and cab freq response. That's probably a lack of low middle frequencies and it's a very popular issue. Much of this depends on what Your band plays. Sometimes that wideness and breath of tone hides beofre cymbals and bass guitar. What is left for the guitar and vocals in a live mix is the middle. At first try to borrow some EQ and plug it into the fx loop of Your amp. You can try to boost some 200-500 range and make a cut off above 6kHz. This usually gives a tone that maches real drums sound live. Of course if the room is well prepaired or You are playing on the open spece rules changes. But as far as I know how usually look most of band checking rooms or small pubs for underground music playing this is where You could search for the fatness of Your tone.

Of course...if it's just a matter of gain than friends already wrote some advices


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Saddlefall
post May 2 2013, 02:22 PM
Post #5


Learning Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 127
Joined: 28-December 11
From: Norway
Member No.: 14.711



Thanks guys! I will probably try to tweak the EQ and prescence on my amp a little more first, then maybe invest in a tube screamer as well.

I'll check out some reviews of pedals, like the Xotic. I also heard the ibanez tube screamer is good?


--------------------
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Explorer
Jackson Warrior WRXT
Jackson RR24
Schecter Demon 7 string

Amp:
Marshall JMD:1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post May 2 2013, 03:54 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.664
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (PosterBoy @ May 2 2013, 12:20 AM) *
A lot of people use a tube screamer with the drive set a minimum and use the level control to boost the front end of the amp. It helps to give a tighter bass response from the amp and should help beef up your sound. Then you can probably bring your gain on the amp down a little, as too much gain will thin out your sound.


+1

Too much gain is many times the culprit when going from playing on your own to playing with a band.
Also, which pre-amp model are you using? If you're primarily using the 'modern' settings try using the classic or vintage models (plexi?).


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Saddlefall
post May 2 2013, 05:23 PM
Post #7


Learning Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 127
Joined: 28-December 11
From: Norway
Member No.: 14.711



QUOTE (klasaine @ May 2 2013, 02:54 PM) *
+1

Too much gain is many times the culprit when going from playing on your own to playing with a band.
Also, which pre-amp model are you using? If you're primarily using the 'modern' settings try using the classic or vintage models (plexi?).

I think Im using modern.. Ill try some of the others, thanks!


--------------------
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Explorer
Jackson Warrior WRXT
Jackson RR24
Schecter Demon 7 string

Amp:
Marshall JMD:1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jstcrsn
post May 2 2013, 07:45 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.641
Joined: 29-March 08
From: kansas, USA
Member No.: 4.733



QUOTE (Darius Wave @ May 2 2013, 09:15 AM) *
I'm afraid the thing You consider as "thin" sound is rather not a matter of input but of the amp and cab freq response. That's probably a lack of low middle frequencies and it's a very popular issue. Much of this depends on what Your band plays. Sometimes that wideness and breath of tone hides beofre cymbals and bass guitar. What is left for the guitar and vocals in a live mix is the middle. At first try to borrow some EQ and plug it into the fx loop of Your amp. You can try to boost some 200-500 range and make a cut off above 6kHz. This usually gives a tone that maches real drums sound live. Of course if the room is well prepaired or You are playing on the open spece rules changes. But as far as I know how usually look most of band checking rooms or small pubs for underground music playing this is where You could search for the fatness of Your tone.

Of course...if it's just a matter of gain than friends already wrote some advices

along these lines as well, guitarists tend to eq their guitar to a professionally mixed sound rather than eq-ing for a live band . This makes it thin and blends with the bass - geting lost in the mix. mid-range ish frequencies will thicken your tone as well as let your guitar be more distinguishable - problem with this is the mids do start reducing the tone/drive that most desire.
I have come to realize that in a live show I want my guitar to stand out more than getting this so called perfect guitar tone, and when I can hear my guitar standing out it lets me feel comfortable to let loose

I don't think Marshalls have closed back cabs, if you can plug into a closed back for a sound comparison, usually they have some bass/ mid response that opened back cabs don't
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th January 2017 - 09:12 PM