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> Who's Your Favorite Classical Composer?
Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 11 2013, 08:17 AM
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I accidentally stumbled over a very nice collection of Vivaldi's greatest 'hits' and I thought I might ask you guys who is it that inspires you when it comes down to classical music smile.gif



I for one love Vivaldi's works, simply because they are very melodic, he can really set up an atmosphere and the phrasing is very fresh - it doesn't have that sort of vibe that would automatically take your mind towards Yngwie Malmsteen somehow laugh.gif

I also think that even picking up little snipets/phrases out of these works can greatly increase your technical level of execution and your vocabulary as well.

So, who's your favorite and why?


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jun 11 2013, 01:55 PM
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This is a very difficult question!! I enjoy each one of the big masters from Baroque to Impressionists: Bach, Paganini, Vivaldi, Mozart, Beethoven and even Debussy. I couldn't choose one because they are very different for me.


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klasaine
post Jun 11 2013, 02:01 PM
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If I 'had' to pick one ... Beethoven.

*I think Mozart is perfect and perhaps the only musician actually touched by god but in Beethoven, I hear the struggle.


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vonhotch
post Jun 11 2013, 02:07 PM
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I'm not really very knowledgable about classical, but I do like some of the obvious famously known classical pieces. Mostly from Bugs Bunny cartoons I think. laugh.gif I guess I find myself drawn to Beethoven pieces as much as any.


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PosterBoy
post Jun 11 2013, 05:38 PM
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I'm going to say Bach, I was told some stuff about him recently which makes me want to read a book of his life. He had an amazing work ethic.


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jstcrsn
post Jun 11 2013, 06:13 PM
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I studied classical piano for a while , and when you here some of the circumstances that these were written under and pair that with the feeling of the song . It is much easier to understand classical. That being said, this is my favorite
Chopin wrote this as invading armies captured the city where his parents lived. He did not know if they lived or not.
Listen to this song as if you just found out that same plight happened to you
(of course if you don't like your parents, it won't have the same effect.


of course everybody knows this one

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leonard478
post Jun 11 2013, 08:34 PM
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Chopin, Handel, Bach (always number 1 for me ), and Debussy, absolutely love his sense of melody, but i'll be honest i really havent explored classical music as much as i should tongue.gif

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Jun 11 2013, 07:17 AM) *
I accidentally stumbled over a very nice collection of Vivaldi's greatest 'hits' and I thought I might ask you guys who is it that inspires you when it comes down to classical music smile.gif



I for one love Vivaldi's works, simply because they are very melodic, he can really set up an atmosphere and the phrasing is very fresh - it doesn't have that sort of vibe that would automatically take your mind towards Yngwie Malmsteen somehow laugh.gif

I also think that even picking up little snipets/phrases out of these works can greatly increase your technical level of execution and your vocabulary as well.

So, who's your favorite and why?



a goal of mine is to transcribe that violin solo starting at 3:11, unfotunately time constraints and well..patience for it , are lacking at the moment laugh.gif but its eerily beautiful



QUOTE (leonard478 @ Jun 11 2013, 07:27 PM) *
Chopin, Handel, Bach (always number 1 for me ), and Debussy, absolutely love his sense of melody, but i'll be honest i really havent explored classical music as much as i should tongue.gif

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David.C.Bond
post Jun 11 2013, 09:49 PM
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Shostakovich has always been my favourite composer. Also like Stravinsky, Wagner and Beethoven!


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Mertay
post Jun 11 2013, 10:41 PM
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I advise Ravel's piano works...he's the guy who invertend powerchords smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 12 2013, 12:35 AM
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I just can't resist throwing in a little PAGANINI!!!

Just to illustrate the POWER OF PRACTICE here is a 12 Year Old Girl RIPPING IT UP!!!!



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leonard478
post Jun 12 2013, 12:44 AM
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oh my god that was beautfiul thanks Todd!

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jun 11 2013, 11:35 PM) *
I just can't resist throwing in a little PAGANINI!!!

Just to illustrate the POWER OF PRACTICE here is a 12 Year Old Girl RIPPING IT UP!!!!


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Patrik Berg
post Jun 12 2013, 01:51 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jun 11 2013, 11:35 PM) *
I just can't resist throwing in a little PAGANINI!!!

Just to illustrate the POWER OF PRACTICE here is a 12 Year Old Girl RIPPING IT UP!!!!


Wow that was amazing, I love the harmonics at 5:47, I didn't even know they could do that on violin


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 12 2013, 05:06 AM
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Speaking of classical bits, how about this for a good example of a STREEEEEEEETTTCCCCHHH in context. Here is a great classical guitar gal named ANA VIDOVIC. Playing PAGANINI of course smile.gif Check the stretch on this gal. The full vid is included. Great playing, great composer.

Youtube vid



QUOTE (leonard478 @ Jun 11 2013, 07:44 PM) *
oh my god that was beautfiul thanks Todd!




Nice eh? smile.gif About 5:05 in to the vid, she does my fav scale inversion that I ripped off the first time I heard this piece and use quite often in video chat lessons!! She also does some Pedal Point stuff that I borrowed as well from Mr. P.

These are common classical bits of course, but until I heard them in Paganini they never jumped out at me. For some reason, a lot of his stuff seems to translate to lead playing. Mr. Malmsteen used to take bits whole cloth from the pagster. He finally started admitting to it in interviews but for while he was like "it's all me I have no influences" heheheh.


QUOTE (Patrik Berg @ Jun 11 2013, 08:51 PM) *
Wow that was amazing, I love the harmonics at 5:47, I didn't even know they could do that on violin


Impressive eh? The harmonics, the lead runs, the arpeggios, she really is impressive. Paganini has lots of bits like this in his music which is what makes his stuff so cool IMHO smile.gif Sort of a Baroque Metal Head Lead composer smile.gif

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jun 12 2013, 05:22 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 12 2013, 08:19 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jun 11 2013, 01:01 PM) *
If I 'had' to pick one ... Beethoven.

*I think Mozart is perfect and perhaps the only musician actually touched by god but in Beethoven, I hear the struggle.


Oh, most definitely - Mozart is bright and happy while in Beethoven's music you can feel the darkness and heavy atmosphere!

QUOTE (vonhotch @ Jun 11 2013, 01:07 PM) *
I'm not really very knowledgable about classical, but I do like some of the obvious famously known classical pieces. Mostly from Bugs Bunny cartoons I think. laugh.gif I guess I find myself drawn to Beethoven pieces as much as any.


See, in the past cartoons were a source of learning - proof? You know about classical music from watching cartoons biggrin.gif

QUOTE (Mertay @ Jun 11 2013, 09:41 PM) *
I advise Ravel's piano works...he's the guy who invertend powerchords smile.gif


I had no idea - can you tell me more?

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jun 12 2013, 04:06 AM) *
Speaking of classical bits, how about this for a good example of a STREEEEEEEETTTCCCCHHH in context. Here is a great classical guitar gal named ANA VIDOVIC. Playing PAGANINI of course smile.gif Check the stretch on this gal. The full vid is included. Great playing, great composer.

Youtube vid





Nice eh? smile.gif About 5:05 in to the vid, she does my fav scale inversion that I ripped off the first time I heard this piece and use quite often in video chat lessons!! She also does some Pedal Point stuff that I borrowed as well from Mr. P.

These are common classical bits of course, but until I heard them in Paganini they never jumped out at me. For some reason, a lot of his stuff seems to translate to lead playing. Mr. Malmsteen used to take bits whole cloth from the pagster. He finally started admitting to it in interviews but for while he was like "it's all me I have no influences" heheheh.




Impressive eh? The harmonics, the lead runs, the arpeggios, she really is impressive. Paganini has lots of bits like this in his music which is what makes his stuff so cool IMHO smile.gif Sort of a Baroque Metal Head Lead composer smile.gif


Indeed, Paganini had the soul of a metalhead rockstar a long time before metalheads ever existed. I told this myself a long time ago - did you know he was THAT good that he could perform the same piece on one string after the others broke? It was depicted in a movie as well:

'One memorable scene shows Paganini's adversaries sabotaging his violin before a high-profile performance, causing all strings but one to break during the concert. An undeterred Paganini continues to perform on three, two, and finally on a single string. In actuality, Paganini occasionally broke strings during a performance on purpose so he could further display his virtuosity.'


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 12 2013, 10:46 AM
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Now that is flat out Impressive!!! We do a lot of single string work in vid chats, spreading a scale out over the neck on one string then doing the same scale (Natural Minor for example) in a 3 note per string scale shape. But playing one of his pieces on one string? Borderline inhuman! smile.gif

I started working on crazy stretches during some classical lessons and we have been having fun with those too lately in chat. I think I May have pushed it a bit far actually in the last chat or two. smile.gif

BTW Great Thread Cos!!!!!

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Jun 12 2013, 03:19 AM) *


Indeed, Paganini had the soul of a metalhead rockstar a long time before metalheads ever existed. I told this myself a long time ago - did you know he was THAT good that he could perform the same piece on one string after the others broke? It was depicted in a movie as well:

'One memorable scene shows Paganini's adversaries sabotaging his violin before a high-profile performance, causing all strings but one to break during the concert. An undeterred Paganini continues to perform on three, two, and finally on a single string. In actuality, Paganini occasionally broke strings during a performance on purpose so he could further display his virtuosity.'




This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jun 12 2013, 10:47 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 12 2013, 10:51 AM
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Thanks Todd biggrin.gif Glad you're enjoying it! i should definitely find some time to join you guys when it comes down to classical stuff biggrin.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 15 2013, 05:10 AM
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We do "quasi classical" or "Semi Classical" bits in chat smile.gif Nothing too formal of course. Mostly me pulling from from my old instructor when I was learning nylon string stuff. As I've seen from your playing, you've got quite a bit of that influence as well!

Todd
QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Jun 12 2013, 05:51 AM) *
Thanks Todd biggrin.gif Glad you're enjoying it! i should definitely find some time to join you guys when it comes down to classical stuff biggrin.gif



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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 15 2013, 12:35 PM
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Well, influence might be the right and real word - I have never formally studied classical music, but I only jumped straight into the 'Mozart Rocks!' style orchestrations, so that actually allowed my ear to dictate what sounded good or bad over the compositions of the greats.

For me it's mostly a combination between renditions of the great pieces with little orchestration snippets and phrasing of my own smile.gif


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Mertay
post Jun 15 2013, 12:50 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Jun 12 2013, 07:19 AM) *
I had no idea - can you tell me more?



In classical harmony (until Ravel) it was considered a very "weak" effect when using perfect 5th's like in metal we use today. So you can't hear such harmonic (or interval) movement before Ravel.

I can't remember the songs name but I do remember it was for only piano. He used it somewhere in the song and it was "accepted"...though keep in mind many musical aesthetic rules were broken in classical music at and after his era smile.gif


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Spock
post Jun 15 2013, 01:08 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jun 11 2013, 07:35 PM) *
I just can't resist throwing in a little PAGANINI!!!

Just to illustrate the POWER OF PRACTICE here is a 12 Year Old Girl RIPPING IT UP!!!!




I'm with you on that. When I was an art student in college, I use to paint/draw by candle light with either Mozart or Paganini playing. There were some other big names too I listened to, but those were my go-tos. Other then that, I really don't have much knowledge of classical.

Eventually, I started getting into weird world/space/new age music - it gave me the same inner peace feeling. Stuff like Loreena McKennet, Onya and weird artists that made ambient background sounds/music.

I still listen to that stuff at work streaming on iTunes - I like the creativity it induces as well as the sense of well being. I keep my office dark, have a little ball that filters water over rocks, and play that stuff still today.
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