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> Relative Major, Pentatonic Minor
Hajduk
post Jun 25 2013, 08:06 AM
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Have a Theory question here biggrin.gif If Im playing A pentatonic minor then play F# pentatonic minor which I believe is the relative Major to A does that turn that into a major Pentatonic?


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The Professor
post Jun 25 2013, 10:08 AM
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QUOTE (Hajduk @ Jun 25 2013, 08:06 AM) *
Have a Theory question here biggrin.gif If Im playing A pentatonic minor then play F# pentatonic minor which I believe is the relative Major to A does that turn that into a major Pentatonic?



That's basically it man. If you play F# minor pentatonic, F#-A-B-C#-E, those are the same notes as the A major pentatonic scale, A B C# E F#.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jun 25 2013, 03:16 PM
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Yeah, both scales have the same notes, but be sure to visualize the root of the scale that you are playing.


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Hajduk
post Jun 25 2013, 04:16 PM
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Nice, starting to understand theory a bit more smile.gif so as long as you emphasise certain notes like if I keep returning to the A note to emphasise the key of A that keeps it sounding in the right key? If the key is in A.


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The Professor
post Jun 25 2013, 06:23 PM
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QUOTE (Hajduk @ Jun 25 2013, 04:16 PM) *
Nice, starting to understand theory a bit more smile.gif so as long as you emphasise certain notes like if I keep returning to the A note to emphasise the key of A that keeps it sounding in the right key? If the key is in A.


That's basically it, but it's more the chord you are playing over. If you use those notes over F#m then it'll sound like F#m. but if you keep the same notes and the chord changes to A, it'll sound like A.

Try putting on a backing track that changes from F#m to A every 4 bars, and solo with the F# minor pent scale to hear how the notes stay the same but the sound changes when the chords change underneath your solo.


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