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> This Is What We Called Shredding ...
Gabriel Leopardi
post Jul 15 2013, 01:30 AM
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an what about this guy? I would consider this playing Shred, but in this case I can also hear music, not just fast notes.



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Todd Simpson
post Jul 16 2013, 06:32 PM
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Jason Becker is Awesome smile.gif His band CACAPHONY were pioneers of the genre. Don't forget that band also featured Marty Friedman smile.gif

QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jul 14 2013, 08:30 PM) *
an what about this guy? I would consider this playing Shred, but in this case I can also hear music, not just fast notes.




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Slavenko Erazer
post Jul 31 2013, 10:47 AM
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You can't kill the shred..


This is famous serbian shredder (now lives in Sweden , maybe he could work for Gmc, huh biggrin.gif )



Here's another one Serbian , and well famous in world

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sammetal92
post Jul 31 2013, 12:45 PM
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While I agree with defining the terms "Shredder" and "Virtuoso" differently so as not to confuse them, I have to say that guitar is a musical instrument, and its meant for making music, no offense to any shredder out there, I'm just stating the obvious, but all the guitarists mentioned here are musicians too. But if I see a guy playing random notes at 350 or so BPM and then if I ask him to improvise some cool melody line and he fails at that, I would never consider him a musician.

Oh, and for me atleast, a Virtuoso is greater than a Shredder, because a virtuoso can play at at least 3/4 of the speed that a shredder can (most can play as fast as shredders). The most obvious examples are Jason Becker, Michael Angelo Batio and John Petrucci (Yes I've seen petrucci play pretty damn fast and most people have tongue.gif )

Oh and this guy too: Eric Calderone from LA, he's a professor.



This post has been edited by sammetal92: Jul 31 2013, 12:51 PM


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Darius Wave
post Jul 31 2013, 12:54 PM
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Jason Becker is insane player. But back then We would call him virtuoso smile.gif


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sammetal92
post Jul 31 2013, 12:57 PM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Jul 31 2013, 11:54 AM) *
Jason Becker is insane player. But back then We would call him virtuoso smile.gif


Exactly, shredder + musician = virtuoso tongue.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jul 31 2013, 01:45 PM
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QUOTE (sammetal92 @ Jul 31 2013, 08:57 AM) *
Exactly, shredder + musician = virtuoso tongue.gif


I would say: shredder + musical = virtuoso


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sammetal92
post Jul 31 2013, 03:46 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jul 31 2013, 12:45 PM) *
I would say: shredder + musical = virtuoso


laugh.gif Agreed


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Darius Wave
post Aug 1 2013, 09:03 AM
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Ok...You win ha ha smile.gif))


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Slavenko Erazer
post Aug 1 2013, 09:41 AM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Aug 1 2013, 10:03 AM) *
Ok...You win ha ha smile.gif))



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Larry F
post Aug 4 2013, 11:56 PM
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I love how terms change meaning as music itself changes. Here is a recording from one of my bands in 1974. It's based on the whole tone scale. I practiced like a demon in those days, and my band rehearsed for 3-4 hours a day. We also played a ton of gigs, which was possible back then. I think music will suffer immeasurably by the lack of playing opportunities. People can improve their individual playing without gigs, but I have noticed that rhythm guitar playing nowadays has really gone downhill. This is completely normal when you are not playing with a band.

Here is the 1974 recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJTTXrR9New
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Darius Wave
post Aug 5 2013, 09:09 AM
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QUOTE (Larry F @ Aug 4 2013, 10:56 PM) *
I love how terms change meaning as music itself changes. Here is a recording from one of my bands in 1974. It's based on the whole tone scale. I practiced like a demon in those days, and my band rehearsed for 3-4 hours a day. We also played a ton of gigs, which was possible back then. I think music will suffer immeasurably by the lack of playing opportunities. People can improve their individual playing without gigs, but I have noticed that rhythm guitar playing nowadays has really gone downhill. This is completely normal when you are not playing with a band.

Here is the 1974 recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJTTXrR9New



This is probably the reason why many important, well known guitar masters repeat all the time "go out and play with people" smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 5 2013, 11:42 AM
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I can relate to that smile.gif A simple example?

Practicing at home with the backing track - you can sound great, you know the song, you are relaxed and there is no pressure.

Rehearsing with the band - you tend to be at 80% of your home performance, due to the environment change (especially the tone texture and the volume) and the fact that you can't always hear those well known land marks you could so very well discern at home. Another factor, which can become a very stressful one: 'What will the guys think about my performance? What if they will not like it or what if I will make mistakes?'

Stage - bad monitoring, a crowd which can bring in A LOT of pressure (of course, it's in your mind only tongue.gif), stress caused by technical difficulties such as short or no time at all for a decent soundcheck, missing parts from the venue backline which were supposed to be there, according to what you have requested in the technical rider and I can think of a few more. In this situation, if you are not experienced and able to surpass these obstacles psychologically speaking, your performance can decrease to 50% or sometimes even less..

Conclusion? Experience is gathered from playing with people and as much as possible onstage - go out there and expose yourself to 'dangers' the more you do it, the better you will become!


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Kalidia
post Aug 6 2013, 12:51 PM
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I've never heard of Fareri until Yesterday when I read this thread.. This morning i accidentally saw an article of him (just pulished) where he speaks about shred. I like it very much, i never thought of shred in this way. Unfortunately is in italian ( http://www.musicoff.com/node/11089 ) so i decided to traslate the main parts for you, here's the text ( sorry for errors) :

"Hi! my name is Francesco Fareri and I'm a guitar player, since when i started learning guitar i have been fascinated by classical music and by composer like Chopin, Paganini, Bach and Mozart and found in their music a hugeness of notes plenty of emotions, colors and hues, but most important thing, notes and again notes without losing sight the central musical idea, just listen to "Etude n.1 op.10" of Chopin to understand what i mean...."

The massive usage of technique is called "Virtuosismo" or "Shred". With this term we refer to the use of fast notes sequences, using the guitar technique at its best. Very often this term is associated with "cold" guitarist who play tons of notes without feeling, indeed this aspect of the technique is very debated, but we can surely say that technique allows us to play any musical piece; the technique gives colors to what we play, it's up to use not over use it.

As i said every techniques has its own color, its hue, and these are due to the fundametal characteristics of the technique itself. For example we recognise the aggressivity of the alternate picking contrapposed to the fluidity of a legato phrase....; sweep picking gives instead a "wave effect" alternating low and high notes passing through the middle notes may makes us think to black and white and all the grey hue in between: All of this is technique. The guitarist who is able to play all this hue, to mix them, to find interesting sequences, to create a guitar solo in which technique is only a a mean of expression, to transform his technical ability into passion, is also a musician...
"
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verciazghra
post Aug 7 2013, 08:54 PM
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Both rusty cooley and fareri has always been what I think of as really bad music. But somebody probably likes it and that's fine. It's just for me growing up listening to the richness of Maurice Ravel and Shostakovich, and while they sometimes "shred", it's always with the music at the center. It's details and dynamics, expressive and so forth. I can't see any reason to listen to these guys except that it's "admirable" how much of a "guitarist-race-horse" you can actually be if you don't watch out!


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