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> Practicing Arpeggios With Scales
The Professor
post Jul 19 2013, 10:40 AM
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Practicing Arps and Scales



When learning how to play arpeggios and scales on the guitar, we often learn these two important melodic devices separately, and then try to apply them together when it comes time to solo or write a melody line.

Since we often mix arpeggios and scales in our soloing lines and riffs, it can be very beneficial to practice these two devices together in various combinations, so that we are ready to move between arps and scales seamlessly in a musical situation.

In this lesson, you’ll explore four ways that you can practice any scale and arpeggio pairing in the practice room, ensuring that you are fully prepared for the next time you hit the stage or sit down to write a new riff or lick.

All of the examples below use a Cmaj7 arpeggio and C Major Scale, but feel free to expand these variations to include any/all arpeggios and scales that you know or are working on in the practice room.

As well, feel free to take these exercises to all 12 keys as you work on them further in the practice room.



Arpeggio Up and Scale Down


The first variation we’ll look at uses the arpeggio ascending from the 6th to the 1st string, before running a descending two-octave scale from the 1st string to the 6th string.


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Arpeggio Down and Scale Up


This example switches things around by playing the arpeggio from the 1st to the 6th string, and then ascending the scale from the 6th string to the 1st string.


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Scale Up and Arpeggio Down


Now we can play the scale first in our combination exercise, with this first example ascending the scale from the 6th to the 1st string, before descending the arpeggio from the 1st string to the 6th string.


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Scale Down and Arpeggio Up


In the last variation, we’ll look at uses the scale descending from the 1st to 6th string, before you then ascend the arpeggio from the 6th string up to the first string.


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As you can see, just by combining your arpeggio and scale workouts in these four ways, you will provide yourself with enough variations to keep you busy in the practice room for a good long time.


Do you have a question about these exercises, or about combining arpeggios and scales on the guitar? Post your thoughts or comments in the thread below.


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