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> I Gave 220 To My 110 Mesa Boogie!
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 16 2013, 11:59 PM
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yes,,, as you can read in the thread's tittle I confused the cable and connected my Mesa Boogie to 220 instead of 110 and the fuse exploded. I was very worried about it, I took it to my engineer and fortunately the only thing that he had to do is to replace the fuse. He said that I was lucky, that it could have been much worse...

I did something similar with my Delay Line 6 DL4, I connected it by error to the 18v of my multi-power supply. This happened 2 months ago and after all this time, finally I received the part that must be replaced.

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Have you ever experienced this fatal errors?? ohmy.gif


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jstcrsn
post Aug 17 2013, 01:28 AM
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our new house had a four prong 220 dryer chord ,our dryer had a 3 prong on it, and my wife wanted to check it to make sure the new 4 prong fit before I took the time to put it together, and sent sparks flying as the loose wires started touching each other
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Taka Perry
post Aug 17 2013, 05:39 AM
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Wow, I would probably have a heart attack if I did something like that to an amp ohmy.gif

A while back, I bought a bluetooth car connector for playing music wirelessly. I plugged the charger into the wall, and the moment I turned it on, there was loud bang, a flash, and the thing was dead. Luckily no one was harmed ohmy.gif I think I'm scared of buying cheap components that go into the wall ohmy.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 18 2013, 08:06 AM
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Holy... No way mate - I always pay attention to what I'm connecting to what, due to me being a less technical person, I pay attention to these things a lot, simply because I know that I am more prone to this sort of stuff laugh.gif


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pdf64
post Aug 20 2013, 09:50 AM
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Mesa Boogie got a good reputation in the early days for being resilient to over-voltages from generators etc, by fitting additional protection devices; so it's good that still seems to be true.

I've read that the electrical supply arrangements in Argentina make this an easy mistake to make, especially when in a hurry, setting up in a poorly lit area.
You've been lucky, it can be really devastating to equipment for this to happen, so I would have a talk with your engineer about what can be done to prevent it recurring.

The best solution may be to get all your gear working on the same voltage and then all fed via a from power conditioner - a unit which provides a stable power supply over a wide range of wall voltage variance - which should shut down if such a mistake was made.
It won't give you any cool new sounds but it may prevent the cool sounds you've got from going up in smoke!

At the very least,
1 check the fuses in all your equipment to ensure they are the correct rating and carry spares; if a fuse blows and you don't have the correct spare available, it's easy to put a higher value in with the intention of sorting it out later but then forget all about it.
2. get a simple test meter to check the wall voltage before you plug in (and if you've got a mix of 110 and 220V gear, color code the power cord plugs).
Pete


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Taka Perry
post Aug 20 2013, 11:20 AM
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Funny thing, a while back, I was playing guitar for a school musical, and my teacher was very kind and brought in two of his Mesa Boogies; a Dual Rectifier and a Mark V. They were seriously the best amps I had ever played on, but the whole power situation was pretty silly, we had power boards coming out of power boards, going into valve amps, keyboards, pedals, mics, PA's etc. A real fire hazard now that I look back...


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AK Rich
post Aug 22 2013, 06:14 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Aug 16 2013, 02:59 PM) *
yes,,, as you can read in the thread's tittle I confused the cable and connected my Mesa Boogie to 220 instead of 110 and the fuse exploded. I was very worried about it, I took it to my engineer and fortunately the only thing that he had to do is to replace the fuse. He said that I was lucky, that it could have been much worse...

I did something similar with my Delay Line 6 DL4, I connected it by error to the 18v of my multi-power supply. This happened 2 months ago and after all this time, finally I received the part that must be replaced.

Attached Image


Have you ever experienced this fatal errors?? ohmy.gif

Whoa that's crazy! 110 and 220 outlets are the same in Argentina? If that's the case I can see all kinds of electronics and electrical appliances getting fried down there. I am happy you didn't fry your amp Gabriel! smile.gif Thank the gods for circuit protection!
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