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> Guitar Position
bleez
post Aug 26 2013, 05:29 PM
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Ive always played in the 'guitar on right leg / thumb over the neck' kind of position but Ive been trying to switch to the more classical position with the guitar on the left leg.
I was wondering how many players here use the left leg position and if anyone else has switched playing positions and how you adjusted.... or just general thoughts on playing in the classical position would be very helpful smile.gif



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SpaseMoonkey
post Aug 26 2013, 05:35 PM
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I've always played on my left leg, so I can't help on the transition phase of it. But advice I can give is, you tend to angle the neck up more like you are playing standing and I also put my foot on something such like a water bottle on it's side so it helps hold my left leg up higher. I always tend to use a water bottle as I have one near me at all times. If not not the guitar stand I have works well also.


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The Professor
post Aug 26 2013, 05:40 PM
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I actually had the opposite experience. I used to site in classical position but found that for long practice sessions it would give me back pain and problems. So, I ended up switching to the right leg, with that leg raised a bit to get the guitar closer to my arms and chest.

I would say take your time in classical position, and if you notice your back or shoulders getting sore or tired, then I would take a break and not push it too much at first until you're used to the position. It could be the perfect position for you, but I would just watch for any pain or soreness in your back or shoulders and address that if it comes up.


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Headbanger
post Aug 26 2013, 06:36 PM
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I've tried both and I find the right leg position feels more relaxed and so does the thumb over the neck (when I want it their). To further the standing up thing...I always adjust my strap whilst in my right leg seated position (nothing under foot like bottle) that I use for practise...then when I stand up, my guitar hangs from its strap in the same position that I'm used too. cool.gif


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sammetal92
post Aug 26 2013, 06:41 PM
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I feel more access to the fretboard in the classical position, also when standing up, I have the habit of keeping my back arched backwards (childhood habits), so my chest pumps outwards, so the classical position is more relaxing to me because it forces you to sit very straight smile.gif I guess that's how my back is made from my habits.

Also, the classical position sort of mimics playing guitar standing up because the neck is coming upwards towards you instead of going straight when you're playing on your right leg, so that saves you a bit of practice of playing while standing up, just my 2 cents, your mileage might vary smile.gif


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DeGroot
post Aug 27 2013, 02:47 AM
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I use my left leg with an adjustable classical guitar footstool to raise my left leg. This helped me with a neck angle I like for soloing and comfortability for long playing sessions.

I used to play off my right leg for a long time but I found some restriction with the heel on my Les Paul. I also would get serious tendon soreness in between my thumb and index finger from the extra stretching to the highest frets.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 27 2013, 08:13 AM
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You know my thoughts wink.gif As we already discussed this one smile.gif


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bleez
post Aug 27 2013, 12:55 PM
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Very interesting points guys, thanks. What Ive noticed so far is that the legato stuff Ive been working on was practically instantly improved when I switched to the left leg but a lot of the alt picking exercises were quite difficult. I really had to slow a lot of them down quite a bit. Bends as well are quite weird. Although the actual position itself is starting to feel more natural.



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 27 2013, 08:13 AM) *
You know my thoughts wink.gif As we already discussed this one smile.gif

biggrin.gif yes.... and Im sure there will be much more discussion on the subject in the near future!


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sammetal92
post Aug 27 2013, 05:25 PM
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QUOTE (bleez @ Aug 27 2013, 11:55 AM) *
Very interesting points guys, thanks. What Ive noticed so far is that the legato stuff Ive been working on was practically instantly improved when I switched to the left leg but a lot of the alt picking exercises were quite difficult. I really had to slow a lot of them down quite a bit. Bends as well are quite weird. Although the actual position itself is starting to feel more natural.


The alt picking stuff got harder because your hand instantly went into its "natural" hanging position, instead of you trying to get your pick lined up with the right hand. Since you've played largely on your right leg, that position feels more natural to you but its not, its only something you got used to. So if you play a bit more on the left leg, you'll notice how comfortable your hands would feel and you'll tire less in the same amount of playing time than you would've if you were playing on your right leg smile.gif

I've also found that playing palm muted stuff and pinch harmonics is easier on the left leg, for me at least. But I'm used to both positions, so I don't really mind either.

The bends, yeah I'll agree to that. Since I've joined GMC a lot of people told me that I had very little vibrato, so I worked very hard on getting my bends and vibrato strong with Ben's vibrato lessons, and now, if I say so myself (I Don't mean to boast tongue.gif) that I can extremely wide and strong vibratos, but they tend to get soft on the left leg, but its not very noticeable to the person who's listening, so yeah, works for me. A little compromise for so many advantages seems better to me cool.gif No offense to anyone though tongue.gif

This post has been edited by sammetal92: Aug 27 2013, 05:25 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 28 2013, 08:07 AM
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I think it's a matter of getting used to things that are and feel natural for your body - in my case, I use the left leg for everything except for one thing smile.gif Playing acoustic and vocals in the same time - I can look at the neck easily when holding the guitar on my right leg, without moving my head too much away from the microphone.


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Todd Simpson
post Aug 29 2013, 02:30 AM
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BINGO! smile.gif This is what really helped me when I first learning to play runs that hit every string. The angle of attack this creates on the guitar neck helped me quite a bit which is why I suggest it for our video chats. Of course, you can play just fine, mostly, on the right leg with the thumb over the top of the neck. However, most of the stuff we do in chats often requires a bit of a finger stretch and dexterity that greatly benefit from sitting in proper classical position.

But hey it's guitar, and it all comes down to the player so you gotta do what feels best for you smile.gif

Todd

QUOTE (DeGroot @ Aug 26 2013, 09:47 PM) *
I use my left leg with an adjustable classical guitar footstool to raise my left leg. This helped me with a neck angle I like for soloing and comfortability for long playing sessions.

I used to play off my right leg for a long time but I found some restriction with the heel on my Les Paul. I also would get serious tendon soreness in between my thumb and index finger from the extra stretching to the highest frets.



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