Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Re-amp
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 27 2013, 11:50 PM
Post #1


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 29.261
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



Hey guys! As I said in another thread, my girlfriends father is engineer and he is helping me with all the technical issues of my equipment, not only as a guitarist, also at my studio. On the other hand, we are helping him with promotion (he works repairing gear) with this page: SDM

The last thing that he created for me is a box base on the "reamp box" to allow us to reamp guitars recorded by line at the studio and experiment with different amps an settings.

If this is something new for you, please read this:

"Reamping is a process often used in multitrack recording in which a recorded signal is routed back out of the editing environment and run through external processing or reverb chamber. Originally, the technique was used mostly for guitars: it facilitates a separation of guitar playing from guitar amplifier processing—a previously recorded audio program is played back and re-recorded at a later time for the purpose of adding effects, ambience, or modified tonality. The technique has since evolved to include many other applications. Re-amping can also be applied to other instruments and program, such as recorded drums, synthesizers, and virtual instruments.
Examples of common re-amping objectives include musically useful amplifier distortion, room tone, compression, EQ/filters, envelopes, resonance, and gating. Re-amping is often used to "warm up" dry tracks, which often means adding complex, musically interesting compression, distortion, filtering, ambience, and other pleasing effects. By playing a dry signal through a studio's main monitors and then using room mics to capture the ambience, engineers are able to create realistic reverbs and blend the wet signal with the original dry recording to achieve the desired amount of depth.
The technique is especially useful for softening stereo drum tracks. By pointing the monitors away from each other and miking each speaker individually, the stereo image can be well preserved and a new depth can be added to the track. It is important to check that the microphones being used are in phase to avoid problems with the mix."



The producer of this albums told me that he recorded guitar using the reamping process on this two albums.






This is my reamp: smile.gif

Attached Image


Have you ever used this method?




--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 28 2013, 02:55 AM
Post #2


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.849
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



I try to always send a clean signal to a separate channel - no FX, no drive - specifically for the purposes of re-amping. These days it's pretty much de rigueur in the studio. Especially for music that isn't mine - which is most of what I record - you never really know what somebody's ultimately gonna want.
Plus ... everybody's afraid to commit these days.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Aug 28 2013, 02:57 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Darius Wave
post Aug 28 2013, 03:06 PM
Post #3


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 5.341
Joined: 29-November 12
From: Poland
Member No.: 17.069



Very cool idea. I also always try to record line signal if at the mixing stage different amp tone will fit or some other issue will come out smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 28 2013, 03:16 PM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 29.261
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Aug 28 2013, 11:06 AM) *
Very cool idea. I also always try to record line signal if at the mixing stage different amp tone will fit or some other issue will come out smile.gif



Yes, this is something that could help in the mix, if the tone that you use doesn't fit well.


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Aug 29 2013, 02:25 AM
Post #5


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.765
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



I use the REAMP method in SOFTWARE smile.gif I always record guitars clean/direct. Then I use various sims/IRs etc. to "reamp" the signal but virtually in software. I have tried reamping with a real amp in my friends studio (we used his Mesa) and it did sound really cool smile.gif But right after, I tweaked an overloud TH2 patch that sounded darn close. Reamping is a great way to add flexibility in to things. You can always go back and try new amps. Doing it in software is really handy as well since it can be done on a laptop without needing to go back in the studio.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
pdf64
post Aug 29 2013, 09:52 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 43
Joined: 1-June 13
Member No.: 18.313



Yes, I sometimes record the mic'ed speaker on one track and a DI of the straight guitar on another; especially if it's not me playing guitar and I'm unsure if they'll be happy being stuck with the live tone.
Then on playback, put the DI through whatever virtual or real fx / amps seem useful.
Mixed a little to each side (panned hard left / right can sound unnatural) and maybe use a delay that sends the repeats to the other side.
Have a listen https://soundcloud.com/redwingrockgroup/drifting Steve does a nice lead break starting about 1:50.
Pete

This post has been edited by pdf64: Aug 29 2013, 09:54 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 29 2013, 10:07 PM
Post #7


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 29.261
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 28 2013, 10:25 PM) *
I use the REAMP method in SOFTWARE smile.gif I always record guitars clean/direct. Then I use various sims/IRs etc. to "reamp" the signal but virtually in software. I have tried reamping with a real amp in my friends studio (we used his Mesa) and it did sound really cool smile.gif But right after, I tweaked an overloud TH2 patch that sounded darn close. Reamping is a great way to add flexibility in to things. You can always go back and try new amps. Doing it in software is really handy as well since it can be done on a laptop without needing to go back in the studio.


This is another reason why it's always useful to record a dry signal when you are recording guitars. There are lots of amp simulators that you can use then in the mix.


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bogdan Radovic
post Aug 30 2013, 01:01 AM
Post #8


Bass & Beginner Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.612
Joined: 30-November 07
From: Belgrade, Serbia
Member No.: 3.410



This is a very cool possibility. What fascinates me is that you can theoretically record at home a dry signal and send it to online studio for re-amping on the real thing. It could really cut down on the recording costs (as you can record at home as long as you want until you are happy with the take) and offer a lot of flexibility of amps and studios to use.

On the other hand, all these possibilities do make the whole music composing/recording process a bit more complex then it has to be. I mean - how to settle on one thing, when there are so many other possibilities? When you record a live amp in studio, you usually set the tone you like and think fits the song and record it - bam that is it. That is the sound you are going to curse in years to come and hate smile.gif On the other hand, you did make a decision when recording and why not go with it?

How is a person who is mixing going to be able to mix the song if there are so many tweaking possibilities?
Must be a lot of pressure knowing that you can actually change "everything" in the quest for a perfect mix/sound smile.gif


--------------------
For GMC support please email support (at) guitarmasterclass.net
Check out my lessons and my instructor board.
Check out my beginner guitar lessons course! ; Take a bass course now!
My solo and band songs : Keep Going On, Night Vibe, Kad Te Vidim, Susret, Plava Silueta
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 30 2013, 01:24 AM
Post #9


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 29.261
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (Bogdan Radovic @ Aug 29 2013, 09:01 PM) *
This is a very cool possibility. What fascinates me is that you can theoretically record at home a dry signal and send it to online studio for re-amping on the real thing. It could really cut down on the recording costs (as you can record at home as long as you want until you are happy with the take) and offer a lot of flexibility of amps and studios to use.

On the other hand, all these possibilities do make the whole music composing/recording process a bit more complex then it has to be. I mean - how to settle on one thing, when there are so many other possibilities? When you record a live amp in studio, you usually set the tone you like and think fits the song and record it - bam that is it. That is the sound you are going to curse in years to come and hate smile.gif On the other hand, you did make a decision when recording and why not go with it?

How is a person who is mixing going to be able to mix the song if there are so many tweaking possibilities?
Must be a lot of pressure knowing that you can actually change "everything" in the quest for a perfect mix/sound smile.gif



Interesting words mate! That process is exactly what Carajo an Massacre (2 mainstream metal / rock bands from my country). They recorded at producer's home studio, relaxed, just thinking on the playing and arrangements and then want to a top level studio to reamp it.

Regarding the endless possibilities, this is something great! and the thing that is important in this game now is experience. The more experienced the mixer is, the best results he will get. Having so many technical possibilities gives now a big importance to the human value and the professionals.


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Aug 30 2013, 03:50 AM
Post #10


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.765
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Yup! smile.gif And blending in some tone from a plugin version can really fill out a guitar signal. It can be overdone of course, like anything, but it can really sound amazing if done right smile.gif
Todd

QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Aug 29 2013, 05:07 PM) *
This is another reason why it's always useful to record a dry signal when you are recording guitars. There are lots of amp simulators that you can use then in the mix.



I have to say I see this quite often that folks can be overwhelmed withe the shear vast amount of options and choices. Sometimes, it's great to just put an SM57 in front of an amp and go for it. smile.gif But as someone who embraced technology early on, I have to say, being able to change anything about a recording/mix at any time can be a wonderful thing as well smile.gif

The great thing about technology is that it's in a state of perpetual change and learning one version of it, is just prep for learning the next version. Again, this can seem overwhelming to folks. Try to look at it as an extension of creating music. Creating a good recording/mix is really just as important IMHO as being able to actually play. Especially now that everyone can have a pretty good recording setup at home with a laptop and some minimal gear.

It's a great time to be alive smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Aug 29 2013, 08:24 PM) *
Interesting words mate! That process is exactly what Carajo an Massacre (2 mainstream metal / rock bands from my country). They recorded at producer's home studio, relaxed, just thinking on the playing and arrangements and then want to a top level studio to reamp it.

Regarding the endless possibilities, this is something great! and the thing that is important in this game now is experience. The more experienced the mixer is, the best results he will get. Having so many technical possibilities gives now a big importance to the human value and the professionals.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 31 2013, 12:34 AM
Post #11


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 29.261
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 29 2013, 11:50 PM) *
Yup! smile.gif And blending in some tone from a plugin version can really fill out a guitar signal. It can be overdone of course, like anything, but it can really sound amazing if done right smile.gif
Todd




I have to say I see this quite often that folks can be overwhelmed withe the shear vast amount of options and choices. Sometimes, it's great to just put an SM57 in front of an amp and go for it. smile.gif But as someone who embraced technology early on, I have to say, being able to change anything about a recording/mix at any time can be a wonderful thing as well smile.gif

The great thing about technology is that it's in a state of perpetual change and learning one version of it, is just prep for learning the next version. Again, this can seem overwhelming to folks. Try to look at it as an extension of creating music. Creating a good recording/mix is really just as important IMHO as being able to actually play. Especially now that everyone can have a pretty good recording setup at home with a laptop and some minimal gear.

It's a great time to be alive smile.gif

Todd



haha it's true.. I always think that I'm happy of being able to live the transition between analog and digital and between a world without and with internet.


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 28th July 2017 - 05:47 PM