Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Mindful Repetition
PosterBoy
post Aug 31 2013, 08:13 AM
Post #1


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.385
Joined: 26-October 11
From: Galway, Ireland
Member No.: 14.225



I was given a copy of Frank Gambale's Chops Builder which is a series of 'warm ups'

Frank covers many types of exercises in his regiment of exercises: Alternate picking triplets, Alternate picking sixteenth notes, Combination triplets and sixteenth notes, Major scales and their modes, Melodic minor modes, Harmonic minor modes, Diminished and whole tone scales, Interval scales and patterns, Chromatic exercises, String skipping, Sweep picking triad arpeggios, Hammer-ons and Pull-offs, Stretch voicings, Blues progressions, and much more.

As I was learning the first and 2nd Round of warm ups, I started to find drills I had to slow down or break parts down until I could get them to my normal speed, it reminded me of Todd and Ben's video chats and approaches to getting technique down

Also I have reached a drill that requires more work on my part, I'm watching Frank and his students running it and whilst they are playing at a faster tempo than me, their fingers don't seem to be moving as fast. It baffled me for a few minutes until I recalled Rick Graham saying something the other day, normally people say speed is a by product of accuracy but he said Speed is a by product of efficiency.

So with the drill I'm having issues with I am starting to really look into each movement and position shift to minimise wasted effort of the left hand, which is making things look less hurried and allowing me to up the tempo.


--------------------
Currently Working on

PosterBoy's Modern Riffing with Gabriel

PosterBoy's Bootcamp with Todd



Gear
Tyler Burning Water 2K
Burny RLG90 with BK Emeralds
Fender US Tele with BK Piledrivers
Axe Fx Ultra - GCP Pro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 31 2013, 03:35 PM
Post #2


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



hey man - it's always great to see the results of slowing down and breaking things into small pieces that you can assimilate biggrin.gif Isn't it?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 31 2013, 03:49 PM
Post #3


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 28.085
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



Hi mate! That's a great trainer! I also worked on it an it was really helpful. And these though that you shared are the big secret behind playing fast! There are 2 important things to have in mind when you are trying to play fast:

1. Efficiency
2. Muting the strings that mustn't sound.



--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
verciazghra
post Sep 1 2013, 10:24 AM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 266
Joined: 10-July 13
Member No.: 18.475



There's a great section in the book The Inner Game of Music by Brian Greene which deals with a concept of awareness practice. Whenever you find that you can't do something, rather than being critical towards yourself and becoming frustrated, it tries to emphazise a mindset where you become increasingly aware of what you're doing; where your playing is breaking apart; if you're tensing up at that moment; what you think may be the problem, and so on.

It's a great way to think, especially when you've started breaking things apart the way you have; because, you might instinctively start trying too much to make that difference that you want to see happen. Trying can become a mental hinderrance in which you start tensing up more or start becoming critical again. Doing what you're doing, and adding this concept of just being aware and explorative rather than too hard on yourself and trying to force changes can be a great way to go!

I'm not saying this because I assume that's what you do; however it's what many people do instinctively(myself included when I started doing the breaking apart things). Personally I think isolation-practice(which I call what you're doing) is one of the finest arts involved in practicing and I love what you're describing here!

This post has been edited by verciazghra: Sep 1 2013, 10:25 AM


--------------------
"To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time." -Leonard Bernstein

"The only love affair I have ever had was with music." -Maurice Ravel

"There's no such place as dumb question." -Dose One
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 1 2013, 04:07 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



QUOTE (verciazghra @ Sep 1 2013, 09:24 AM) *
There's a great section in the book The Inner Game of Music by Brian Greene which deals with a concept of awareness practice. Whenever you find that you can't do something, rather than being critical towards yourself and becoming frustrated, it tries to emphazise a mindset where you become increasingly aware of what you're doing; where your playing is breaking apart; if you're tensing up at that moment; what you think may be the problem, and so on.

It's a great way to think, especially when you've started breaking things apart the way you have; because, you might instinctively start trying too much to make that difference that you want to see happen. Trying can become a mental hinderrance in which you start tensing up more or start becoming critical again. Doing what you're doing, and adding this concept of just being aware and explorative rather than too hard on yourself and trying to force changes can be a great way to go!

I'm not saying this because I assume that's what you do; however it's what many people do instinctively(myself included when I started doing the breaking apart things). Personally I think isolation-practice(which I call what you're doing) is one of the finest arts involved in practicing and I love what you're describing here!


Great words mate - I will look this book up myself smile.gif Now the idea is that this concept is available for everything we do in life smile.gif It can be applied to a lot of situations


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
verciazghra
post Sep 1 2013, 04:20 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 266
Joined: 10-July 13
Member No.: 18.475



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Sep 1 2013, 03:07 PM) *
Great words mate - I will look this book up myself smile.gif Now the idea is that this concept is available for everything we do in life smile.gif It can be applied to a lot of situations


Couldn't agree more! smile.gif It's a great read.


--------------------
"To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time." -Leonard Bernstein

"The only love affair I have ever had was with music." -Maurice Ravel

"There's no such place as dumb question." -Dose One
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Sep 1 2013, 07:09 PM
Post #7


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.765
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



I have that very same video.... it's one of those videos where, if somebody walked in on you whilst you were watching it, it would be very hard to explain... tongue.gif

The clothes.... laugh.gif

Good to hear you're noticing areas where you can increase your efficiency of movement. Another fave phrase of mine is:

Give yourself time to get it right.

That could mean slowing it down as much as it takes in order to repeatedly nail a phrase exactly right, instead of rushing with loads of mistakes..

Or it can mean isolating things so you're playing very short reps...

Both of these approaches should be with the intent of minimising chances of mistakes.. and minimising fatigue, thus avoiding tension.

The flip side of this coin is that there will be a necessity to push the boundaries as well in order to break through plateaus.. but that's another story smile.gif




--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 2 2013, 12:07 PM
Post #8


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 1 2013, 06:09 PM) *
I have that very same video.... it's one of those videos where, if somebody walked in on you whilst you were watching it, it would be very hard to explain... tongue.gif

The clothes.... laugh.gif

Good to hear you're noticing areas where you can increase your efficiency of movement. Another fave phrase of mine is:

Give yourself time to get it right.

That could mean slowing it down as much as it takes in order to repeatedly nail a phrase exactly right, instead of rushing with loads of mistakes..

Or it can mean isolating things so you're playing very short reps...

Both of these approaches should be with the intent of minimising chances of mistakes.. and minimising fatigue, thus avoiding tension.

The flip side of this coin is that there will be a necessity to push the boundaries as well in order to break through plateaus.. but that's another story smile.gif


Ben is totally right! The thing is, that whatever you do, you must push away the thoughts that sound like: 'I am too old and too slow, I need to be faster in a short period of time!', 'Those guys on youtube can shred - Why can't I shred?' or 'I can't play like x, y, z... I suck, I totally suck!!'

This is by far, the most unconstructive behavior possible smile.gif Remember - music is not a race and it should bring joy and happiness, not frustration, envy or other bad feelings.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st January 2017 - 04:29 PM