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> Need Help Putting Riff's To Song
Hardtail
post Jul 4 2007, 02:23 PM
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The song is in A Key I think. Main Verse consists of E - F#m - C# - A. Second part consists of E - E/D# - C# - A. The song is kinda slow... its about 60 bpm or a little slower 16th notes.

I have been playing Rhythm for a very long time and I am just now trying to REALLY learn solo. I am getting frustrated because I can't even seem to put together a few notes to transition from one chord to the next. Any advice would be great.

Hardtail


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Andrew Cockburn
post Jul 4 2007, 04:51 PM
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QUOTE (Hardtail @ Jul 4 2007, 09:23 AM) *
The song is in A Key I think. Main Verse consists of E - F#m - C# - A. Second part consists of E - E/D# - C# - A. The song is kinda slow... its about 60 bpm or a little slower 16th notes.

I have been playing Rhythm for a very long time and I am just now trying to REALLY learn solo. I am getting frustrated because I can't even seem to put together a few notes to transition from one chord to the next. Any advice would be great.

Hardtail


Hi - judging by the chords its in E - so a scale of E major should work well with it.


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steve25
post Jul 4 2007, 05:45 PM
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As Andrew has said the E major scale works pretty well here or if you have another scale in mind that uses E you could use that. Here's a site with a load of scale in case you're not sure what the E major scale is.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php

I think on each chord changing in your solo you're also aiming to hit the root note. If someone could confirm that, that would be great smile.gif. Practice your scales and then once you know them pretty well link the boxes together and you'll be able to come up with a good solo for your song. Hope this helped
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Andrew Cockburn
post Jul 4 2007, 05:52 PM
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QUOTE (steve25 @ Jul 4 2007, 12:45 PM) *
I think on each chord changing in your solo you're also aiming to hit the root note. If someone could confirm that, that would be great smile.gif.


Thats a great rule to start with - eventually move to making sure you hit a note in the new chord you are changing to, which will give you more variety. Then after that, figure out how to constructively break these two rules smile.gif


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steve25
post Jul 4 2007, 05:58 PM
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QUOTE (Andrew Cockburn @ Jul 4 2007, 05:52 PM) *
Thats a great rule to start with - eventually move to making sure you hit a note in the new chord you are changing to, which will give you more variety. Then after that, figure out how to constructively break these two rules smile.gif


Yeah i should start doing that now really but at the moment i'm sticking to hitting on the root until i'm comfortable enough for a bit more variety smile.gif.

Also remember to use different techniques when soloing such as slides, hammer ons and pulls offs for example they make your soloing much more interesting to listen to. I forgot to add that in on my last post
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Hardtail
post Jul 5 2007, 05:57 PM
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Thanks Guys!

Last night laying in bed i realized the Key was E. Doh! But that wasn't so much my problem because I was focusing more on the notes.

Some conceptual problems I think I was running into...

1.) How do I know to use the E Major scale instead of say E Minor? I'm guessing it's because E minor does not contain the sharp notes in the song, and Major as opposed to Pentatonic Major contains the needed D#. Is that correct?
2.) How do I know where to start on the fretboard within the scale? Or does it matter?


Another problem I think I've been creating for myself is I've been practicing the Pattern(?) of A minor Pentatonic at the 5th fret. But I keep that shape and move up and down the neck. I'm thinking this has been doing me a disservice since I am actually moving from one minor pentatonic scale to the next and simply reproducing the same pattern. Am I making any sense?

So my final question then is... should I be practicing the entire scale or just patterns or what? Very confused.

Sorry for sounding dumb. I read your basic theory stuff on scales and patterns Andrew and thought I understood it but apparently I don't yet. laugh.gif

Hardtail

This post has been edited by Hardtail: Jul 5 2007, 06:00 PM


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steve25
post Jul 5 2007, 06:11 PM
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Ok what you're trying to do is remember the pattern of the scale. I think in the pentatonic minor scale there are 5 patterns. By the sounds of it you have been practicing 1 of the 5 so it is a good idea to start practicing another pattern if you are comfortable with the one you have. You see, with your pentatonic minor scale which starts on the 5th fret of the bass E string, that is your A-minor. You start on the root note, the 5th fret of the E string is an A note. Move that pattern up one fret so you start on the 6th string and what have you got? The A#-minor pentatonic. So that is why you are trying to remember the pattern in your head so that you're able to switch keys when improvising. So if you wanted to play your pentatonic pattern in the key of G you could start that pattern on the 3rd fret as that is your G note (or 15th fret if you wanted a higher pitched sound). Hope this helped

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Hardtail
post Jul 5 2007, 06:28 PM
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QUOTE (steve25 @ Jul 5 2007, 01:11 PM) *
Ok what you're trying to do is remember the pattern of the scale. I think in the pentatonic minor scale there are 5 patterns. By the sounds of it you have been practicing 1 of the 5 so it is a good idea to start practicing another pattern if you are comfortable with the one you have. You see, with your pentatonic minor scale which starts on the 5th fret of the bass E string, that is your A-minor. You start on the root note, the 5th fret of the E string is an A note. Move that pattern up one fret so you start on the 6th string and what have you got? The A#-minor pentatonic. So that is why you are trying to remember the pattern in your head so that you're able to switch keys when improvising. So if you wanted to play your pentatonic pattern in the key of G you could start that pattern on the 3rd fret as that is your G note (or 15th fret if you wanted a higher pitched sound). Hope this helped



Cool! It did help. Thanks. You just solidified what I just realized I was doing.

So for Major Scale I'm thinking the first box I want to learn would be the pattern found at E Major 4th fret. That shape is the same as C Major in first position (fret 0) if I recall correctly with the exception of that flunky B note which tries to be a part of both... I'm thinking If I start with the pattern I will gain some flexibility switching to other Major scales which I just realized is mostly what I play right now. (Major Scale and Minor Pentatonic)

Comments? hehe

Hardtail


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Eat-Sleep-andJam
post Jul 5 2007, 06:55 PM
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Comments: Good Luck with your song ! Remember to make sure that the chords you picked for your rhythm kind of need to have a flowing type of effect. That will make your leads all the more better.

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steve25
post Jul 5 2007, 07:01 PM
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QUOTE (Hardtail @ Jul 5 2007, 06:28 PM) *
Cool! It did help. Thanks. You just solidified what I just realized I was doing.

So for Major Scale I'm thinking the first box I want to learn would be the pattern found at E Major 4th fret. That shape is the same as C Major in first position (fret 0) if I recall correctly with the exception of that flunky B note which tries to be a part of both... I'm thinking If I start with the pattern I will gain some flexibility switching to other Major scales which I just realized is mostly what I play right now. (Major Scale and Minor Pentatonic)

Comments? hehe

Hardtail


Don't rush yourself learning scales can take some time it won't be an overnight thing. If you want to learn the major scale then sure yeah perhaps learn a pattern on the E major scale or something. Of course once you know that pattern as you now know moving it up and down the fretboard will allow you to play in different keys.

Think of scales as guidelines, when you make a solo you don't play a scale pattern you are playing notes from the scale pattern instead. There are loads of scales but you have to start somewhere, the pentatonic scale is a great place to start!

Eventually when you know your patterns from the scales what you do it you link all the patterns together so instead of soloing in just one or two boxes you are able to solo up and down the whole fretboard! There are lessons on this in the one-on-one lessons. Thanks Kris biggrin.gif. So yeah don't rush yourself make sure you get your scales down properly and also don't forget to practice your scales with a metronome that will help you to keep in time and to get quicker at playing them while still staying in time. Good luck with your song smile.gif

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Andrew Cockburn
post Jul 5 2007, 07:05 PM
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QUOTE (Hardtail @ Jul 5 2007, 12:57 PM) *
So my final question then is... should I be practicing the entire scale or just patterns or what? Very confused.


Sounds like you are getting there now!

Each Scale has a number of patterns that we use to play it on the guitar. So far you have learnt one for Pentatonic - there are another 4 to go if you want to be able to play up and down the neck. Then as for the one box you know, any of these boxes slid up or down will change the scale. To properly know a scale you need to know all of its patterns or boxes.

Ultimately when you are comfortable with boxes you need to move beyond them and see the neck as a whole.


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The JEM
post Jul 7 2007, 04:33 AM
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i dont use scales anymore on solos.
i now get chord forms, find root notes,and play as many passing notes in between as i can as long as it sounds good. it just takes a little bit more creativity then notes on a scale


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Ryan
post Jul 7 2007, 08:55 AM
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QUOTE (The JEM @ Jul 6 2007, 10:33 PM) *
i dont use scales anymore on solos.
i now get chord forms, find root notes,and play as many passing notes in between as i can as long as it sounds good. it just takes a little bit more creativity then notes on a scale

Yeah, Im starting to get into using chords also. Or should i say. Arpeggios, they can add a very nice touch to your playing!!

This post has been edited by Ryan: Jul 7 2007, 08:55 AM


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slash85
post Jul 11 2007, 08:18 AM
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yeah mate rpeggios are awesome....i have a chord progression i use which is---Em----C----G----D and it sounds preety sweet and i wanted to make a second part for lead and i just picked notes from the chord shapes and bobs yur god damn uncle it was great so i try use arpeggios to help create a good lead sound


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