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> Slow Down, Advice from Troy Stetina
Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 2 2013, 11:58 AM
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QUOTE (verciazghra @ Oct 1 2013, 07:02 PM) *
Awesome Cosmin that's a great video indeed.

Another point of balance is where your movement is coming from. If you reduce movement but stiffen up and get most of your notes by extending the intermediate phalange you may quickly suffer from tendonitis. This phalange carries little strength and is one of the main reason people develop tendonitis.

If on the other hand you use your proximal phalanges and still try to minimize movement, you'll have greater power and more ease to be relaxed since these fingers are controlled by muscles in the arm rather than by tiny muscles in the hand. This helps eleviate a lot of stress on your wrists and tendons. In piano practice we call that "the natural arch of the hand" which is a very strong concept.


Mate, thank you - you seem to know a lot about mechanics in hands smile.gif Might be compile all the discussion and make up a resume based on 'Piano vs guitar playing - Mechanics comparison'?


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verciazghra
post Oct 2 2013, 07:14 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Oct 2 2013, 10:58 AM) *
Mate, thank you - you seem to know a lot about mechanics in hands smile.gif Might be compile all the discussion and make up a resume based on 'Piano vs guitar playing - Mechanics comparison'?

Sounds like a very good idea, I might write an article on it since that's something that I explore and am immensely interested in every day! I will keep it in mind.


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coffeeman
post Oct 2 2013, 08:01 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Oct 1 2013, 03:03 AM) *
In respect to Vince's video which I find very correct - it's pretty much the same thing on the guitar - the less you move your left hand fingers - by that I mean the less you move them away from the fretboard, the faster and more efficient you will become. I remember seeing this video years ago and only later I understood that a lot of his efficiency came from his minimized movement:



That makes a lot of sense Comsin, but in my humble opinion(and of course you know that I'm not a fast player) there should be a lot of ways to play fast, for example take a look at Andy James, his hands move like a spider on crack and he plays really fast. What do you think about his technique?



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verciazghra
post Oct 3 2013, 12:42 AM
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QUOTE (coffeeman @ Oct 2 2013, 07:01 PM) *
That makes a lot of sense Comsin, but in my humble opinion(and of course you know that I'm not a fast player) there should be a lot of ways to play fast, for example take a look at Andy James, his hands move like a spider on crack and he plays really fast. What do you think about his technique?


I think andy has decent technique, far better than me anyway. He is very clearn and clean in his delivery. I happen to know that Andy never practiced slowly.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 3 2013, 11:42 AM
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QUOTE (coffeeman @ Oct 2 2013, 07:01 PM) *
That makes a lot of sense Comsin, but in my humble opinion(and of course you know that I'm not a fast player) there should be a lot of ways to play fast, for example take a look at Andy James, his hands move like a spider on crack and he plays really fast. What do you think about his technique?



I think he is a very technical guitarist that plays clean and melodic in the same time - that's why I like him smile.gif I don't know how he practiced in order to achieve his chops, but I think he is doing a hell of a job!

Vince - tell us more of what you know on Andy and I am waiting to read the article biggrin.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 5 2013, 12:57 AM
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There's more than one way to skin a cat to be sure smile.gif You can try nearly anything at some point and find new things that work and new things that don't work.

You may find that playing at blitz speed and slowly getting better at that speed works a tad better such as how Yngwie describes how he developed his technique. He does have trouble actually breaking down his own licks though, which is a byproduct of his development. It works though, his playing can be really impressive in parts. He just started from the other end. Fast and clean up as he went instead of slow and build.

As you build speed you will notice your hands adapting in small ways. Finer movement, less wasted effort, adjustments in picking etc. These things develop almost naturally as you push towards greater precision thus allowing greater speed. But as Verc says, not everything works for everyone. So you have to find your own way at some point on some things. No way around it. Trying to develop a solid base from which to expand is, IMHO, a great way to start smile.gif



QUOTE (coffeeman @ Oct 2 2013, 03:01 PM) *
That makes a lot of sense Comsin, but in my humble opinion(and of course you know that I'm not a fast player) there should be a lot of ways to play fast, for example take a look at Andy James, his hands move like a spider on crack and he plays really fast. What do you think about his technique?




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PosterBoy
post Oct 5 2013, 06:58 AM
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It looks like the majority of the flying fingers in Andy's playing is pretty wide interval stuff, the normal interval runs his fingers stay pretty close to the fingerboard


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verciazghra
post Oct 5 2013, 11:00 AM
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Yes Andy said in an interview I saw on another site that he never practiced slowly, rather he's a guy that pushes himself at all costs. I can't remember exactly what he said unfortunately. But it was something along the lines of "the physics of your motions are different when you play quickly than when you play slowly. Basically to speed up I find that you need less movement. I never spent a lot of time practicing slowly I used to just try to play as quickly as possible."


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Darius Wave
post Oct 5 2013, 11:11 AM
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About Andy....I cought one interesting thing he said once. Look closely at his left hand. He has more blues-like left hand mechanics. He mostyl uses 1, 2, 3 without a pinky - every time it's possible smile.gif He admit this at once of his videos smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 5 2013, 12:14 PM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Oct 5 2013, 10:11 AM) *
About Andy....I cought one interesting thing he said once. Look closely at his left hand. He has more blues-like left hand mechanics. He mostyl uses 1, 2, 3 without a pinky - every time it's possible smile.gif He admit this at once of his videos smile.gif


I remember that when we met last year, he told me that everyone bugs him about not using his pinky. I didn't want to talk about guitar playing with him as I didn't want to bug the man - I always avoid talking about guitar playing when I meet famous guitarists - I let them bring it up, because they will eventually do it smile.gif It makes them feel really comfy and relaxed and the conversation can usually take great dimensions - I like that.

I like his playing a lot because he, just as Marco Sfogli, represent a nice mix between technique and nice melodies


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