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> 10 Questions For Every Aspiring Musician
The Professor
post Oct 6 2013, 08:01 PM
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Came across this today and wanted to share it. It's written for jazz musicians, but can be applied to any genre really.

http://www.michaelzilber.com/page/10-quest...g-jazz-musician


What are your thoughts on this article?


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bahadirpeker
post Oct 6 2013, 08:13 PM
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QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 6 2013, 07:01 PM) *
Came across this today and wanted to share it. It's written for jazz musicians, but can be applied to any genre really.

http://www.michaelzilber.com/page/10-quest...g-jazz-musician


What are your thoughts on this article?

Awesome article! Thanks for sharing!
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The Professor
post Oct 6 2013, 08:17 PM
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NP some good stuff in there!


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verciazghra
post Oct 7 2013, 08:42 AM
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My thoughts on that are, I do all that and more, but I still think I can do even more.


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Ben Higgins
post Oct 7 2013, 10:04 AM
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My thoughts on that article would be I'm glad I'm not a jazz musician !

Not because I don't value what they do, quite the contrary, but because I don't believe in such a uniform approach to musical development. Such austere discipline belongs in military training, not the joy of music.

We would never have such hot headed guitar individuals like Eddie, Jimi and just about every other DIY, self taught rock guitarist you can name if they all hadn't done it their own way.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 7 2013, 10:19 AM
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I agree with everything stated in the article and in a personalized form, applied to the music I am playing, I am pretty much following the rules smile.gif Regarding number 10 - it was scientifically proven that in order to reach pro competence in any field, you need about 10 years of practice, so I guess it must be true smile.gif


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klasaine
post Oct 7 2013, 03:26 PM
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Thanks for that.
My favorite part is in the anecdote about his first lesson with
Leibman. The "you didn't pay me to stroke you" part and "the ones who matter will know you're BSing".
When I took lessons from Ted Greene there were times I would cry as I was leaving (everyone who studied with TG can relate a story like that).
*I would argue that Jimi and EVH put in just as much discipline. They were constant practicers. I assume Eddie still is.
Regarded as some of the most creative forces jazz has produced - john Coltrane, eric dolphy and charles Mingus - all practiced as much a 10 hours a day and gigged almost every night until 2:00 am ... not to mention sessions and making their own records. The three I just mentioned all changed the face of and propelled not just jazz but music (art in general) forward

This post has been edited by klasaine: Oct 7 2013, 03:27 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 8 2013, 08:34 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 7 2013, 02:26 PM) *
Thanks for that.
My favorite part is in the anecdote about his first lesson with
Leibman. The "you didn't pay me to stroke you" part and "the ones who matter will know you're BSing".
When I took lessons from Ted Greene there were times I would cry as I was leaving (everyone who studied with TG can relate a story like that).
*I would argue that Jimi and EVH put in just as much discipline. They were constant practicers. I assume Eddie still is.
Regarded as some of the most creative forces jazz has produced - john Coltrane, eric dolphy and charles Mingus - all practiced as much a 10 hours a day and gigged almost every night until 2:00 am ... not to mention sessions and making their own records. The three I just mentioned all changed the face of and propelled not just jazz but music (art in general) forward


It is clear that all these greats have put a lot of time in practicing, thus the great ripple they have triggered in the world of music. I have always wondered though - didn't they get burned out at times? I think that the energy they put into practicing couldn't have always been the same, otherwise they would be machines smile.gif


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verciazghra
post Oct 8 2013, 08:43 AM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Oct 8 2013, 07:34 AM) *
It is clear that all these greats have put a lot of time in practicing, thus the great ripple they have triggered in the world of music. I have always wondered though - didn't they get burned out at times? I think that the energy they put into practicing couldn't have always been the same, otherwise they would be machines smile.gif

"I'm a very lazy person so when I didn't practice I used to sit around and think of my fingers flying across the fretboard, basically noodeling in my head." Allan Holdsworth


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"To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time." -Leonard Bernstein

"The only love affair I have ever had was with music." -Maurice Ravel

"There's no such place as dumb question." -Dose One
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 8 2013, 08:46 AM
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If he says so biggrin.gif


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Caelumamittendum
post Oct 8 2013, 10:45 AM
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For me at least practicing 10 hours a day seems a bit over the top as far as muscle memory, time to relax and let everything settle in goes.


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klasaine
post Oct 8 2013, 12:15 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Oct 8 2013, 12:34 AM) *
I have always wondered though - didn't they get burned out at times? I think that the energy they put into practicing couldn't have always been the same, otherwise they would be machines smile.gif


As for getting burned out occasionally - Probably, I'm sure there were periods of no practice. In my opinion there should be periods where you just put the thing down and take a vacation. Also those musicians were constantly going through transitional phases in their artistic as well as personal/spiritual lives (though Hendrix and Dolphy both died very young), exploring lots of different music from different cultures. It was/is about the search.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 9 2013, 09:23 AM
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I agree - I for one, realize that as time goes by, I want to understand and experience more and more and sometimes, it only feels natural to leave the guitar aside and focus on my voice for instance. In that way, I never feel like getting burned out smile.gif I haven't written any music for sometimes now - by that, I mean, songwriting and since the work on the new Days of Confusion album is beginning, I guess that my focus will shift towards song writing until I am happy with the shape of the ideas for this material. Keeping a fresh perspective on things is crucial in my opinion - I think that's one of the reasons that many people are not being consistent with their instrument and music studies. The journey is important, but when you are not a driven individual by nature, you sometimes need a goal and some pressure to get there smile.gif

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Oct 9 2013, 09:23 AM


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klasaine
post Oct 9 2013, 03:08 PM
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“To achieve great things, two things are needed: a plan and not quite enough time.” - Leonard Bernstein


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 10 2013, 08:06 AM
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Thank you Ken! This one is so good, it ended up right on my FB wall!


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