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ElHombre
post Oct 10 2013, 04:52 PM
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Sooo I got forced to learn this.
Well I think it was great for the chords and pentatonics.

But I do not like this for the actual scales and pentatonics.
This has messed up my Theory pratice.

I pratice in 3 different keys per day.
But I do not know how I will pratice anymore.
I do the scales from the 6 string, all 7 notes in the scale (leaves me with 7 shapes)
The arpeggios from the 5th string I usually do

Should I pratice everything in CAGED instead?


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Oct 10 2013, 11:28 PM
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Hi mate. There are many things that you need to have in mind if you want to become a good improviser. There is not only 1 thing that you have to work, there is a list of things that you have to work to go on the right track and improve your improvisations and scale knowledge.

This is my list:

- Learn Pentatonic Scales (Major & Minor): Learn them in 5 positions all over the neck (based on the Caged System). This scales are the roots for soloing on styles like rock, blues, country, funk and many others. You not only have to learn the scale, you have to improvise with it. So please check the next items.

- Learn the Major Scale: Learn it in 5 positions all over the neck (based on the Caged System). Combine the different positions and be sure that you can recognize the root ever time it appears.

- Patterns: Learn all the patterns possible (there are lots of books and exercises at GMC to do it) and apply them to all positions of pentatonic and major scales.

- Random notes: Use a backing track and play random notes from the scales to incorporate the sound of each note and how they sound combined in different orders. Experiment!

- Triads: Learning the triads will give you the tools to be able to follow the chords when you are improvising. Once you use this method, you are able to play more defined melodies over the different chord progressions and use the notes that aren't in the chord as passing notes. Check Alejandro Pinero's lessons at GMC where he shows how to combine scales with triads.

- Arpeggios: The arpeggios are the extended version of the triads. Learn them and start using them in your improvisations.

- Learn licks from other guitarists: This is like learning phrases of a language. It gives you a starting point to let you communicate your feeling with your instrument. Learn new licks every day.

- Modes: Learn the modes and do the same that you did with Pentatonic and Major scales. Combine them with triads an arpeggios. Search for modal backing tracks at youtube and play the modes over them. Try to incorporate their characteristic sound.

- Learn and analyse solos: The same than with Licks but in this case longer. Learn your favourite solos and analyse what's happening there. Check what scales are being used, how the notes relate with the chords of the progression.

- Improvise: Combine all the previous knowledge and create your own music.


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The Professor
post Oct 10 2013, 11:37 PM
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I don't think you have to used CAGED for scales if they don't jive with your current system. There are many ways to see and play scales on the guitar, so I think it's worth checking out a few and seeing which one fits best for you, or which combinations of scale shapes fit best for you. You might end up using one or two CAGED shapes, I do that, mixed with the 7 shapes that you already know. You should also check out other fingering systems along the way, Segovia Scales, 3NPS etc, to see what you like in those and bring them into your vision of the fretboard.

In the end any scale system is there to visualize the notes of any key or mode on the neck, so you can find one way to do it, such as the 7 mode system you're using, or mix and match from different systems along the way. As long as it allows you to see the neck easily and find your way through a key without thinking, then that's the right system for you. Hope that helps.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 11 2013, 10:15 AM
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QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 10 2013, 10:37 PM) *
In the end any scale system is there to visualize the notes of any key or mode on the neck, so you can find one way to do it, such as the 7 mode system you're using, or mix and match from different systems along the way. As long as it allows you to see the neck easily and find your way through a key without thinking, then that's the right system for you. Hope that helps.


I think that this is the way to go and I find myself combining things more often than not. Flexibility is of the essence, so don't stick to one way if it doesn't feel right for you. I have an exercise for you smile.gif But it's going to be in a video, Erik.



This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Oct 13 2013, 05:55 PM


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