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> Classical Period Lost Artists, What if Mozart had the Internet?
Jim S.
post Oct 22 2013, 01:03 AM
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Today there are so many talented artists that easily spread their art through the web. This in turn creates motivation and momentum breeds evolution in music. If composers then were able to share as easily would the timeline of music shrink? Meaning the years between genres shorter.

Also, what kind of experimental music was being played that didn't get recognized. Was there a high demand for musical instruments or were there just instruments in churches. I bet there were many virtuostic musicians that played in each city like today, just not as many. That would be cool to hear, right?

Just wanted to share an open topic about that era.
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klasaine
post Oct 22 2013, 01:21 AM
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Since Greek and Roman times it has always been considered requisite - if you had even a little money - to play an instrument. It was a fundamental part of your education. Everybody who could afford it had a musical inst in the house. It showed you had some culture.

The 18th century (the classical period - Mozart's era) was a fairly prosperous time - especially in England (comparatively stable democratic govt.) which was a hub for the arts. If you were of the merchant, trader or craftsman class (or higher and maybe remotely 'royal') you had money now to go to the opera and enjoy the arts in general. You'd go to the Vauxhall or Ranelaugh Gardens to hear the latest concertos and songs.

Most, if not all larger churches and cathedrals employed not only professional musicians but the kapellmeister(s) also had to compose new hymns, offertories, masses, etc. damn near every sunday ... not to mention the 'special' Easter and Xmas masses.
Every duke, earl and baron had a court composer and musicians. As well as music teachers for their kids.

There were lots of other composers besides Handel, Bach, Hayden and Mozart. Here's some from the around the 18th century - Johann Christian Bach, capel bond, charles avison, daniel purcell, john hebden, john stanley, joseph gibbs, maurice greene, richard jones, willian boyce, thomas chilcot, micheal festing, thomas linley the younger.
Here's a bigger list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:18th-century_composers
17th cent composers : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:17th-century_composers
16th: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:16th-century_composers
19th: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:19th-century_composers

There was probably more music and musicians around (per capita) because all you had was 'live'.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Oct 22 2013, 03:11 AM


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Jim S.
post Oct 22 2013, 03:23 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 21 2013, 08:21 PM) *
Since Greek and Roman times it has always been considered requisite - if you had even a little money - to play an instrument. It was a fundamental part of your education. Everybody who could afford it had a musical inst in the house. It showed you had some culture.

The 18th century (the classical period - Mozart's era) was a fairly prosperous time - especially in England (comparatively stable democratic govt.) which was a hub for the arts. If you were of the merchant, trader or craftsman class (or higher and maybe remotely 'royal') you had money now to go to the opera and enjoy the arts in general. You'd go to the Vauxhall or Ranelaugh Gardens to hear the latest concertos and songs.

Most, if not all larger churches and cathedrals employed not only professional musicians but the kapellmeister(s) also had to compose new hymns, offertories, masses, etc. damn near every sunday ... not to mention the 'special' Easter and Xmas masses.
Every duke, earl and baron had a court composer and musicians. As well as music teachers for their kids.

There were lots of other composers besides Handel, Bach, Hayden and Mozart. Here's some from the around the 18th century - Johann Christian Bach, capel bond, charles avison, daniel purcell, john hebden, john stanley, joseph gibbs, maurice greene, richard jones, willian boyce, thomas chilcot, micheal festing, thomas linley the younger.
Here's a bigger list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:18th-century_composers
17th cent composers : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:17th-century_composers
16th: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:16th-century_composers
19th: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:19th-century_composers

There was probably more music and musicians around (per capita) because all you had was 'live'.


Ken thanks for the history lesson!
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Oct 22 2013, 04:45 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 21 2013, 09:21 PM) *
Since Greek and Roman times it has always been considered requisite - if you had even a little money - to play an instrument. It was a fundamental part of your education. Everybody who could afford it had a musical inst in the house. It showed you had some culture.

The 18th century (the classical period - Mozart's era) was a fairly prosperous time - especially in England (comparatively stable democratic govt.) which was a hub for the arts. If you were of the merchant, trader or craftsman class (or higher and maybe remotely 'royal') you had money now to go to the opera and enjoy the arts in general. You'd go to the Vauxhall or Ranelaugh Gardens to hear the latest concertos and songs.

Most, if not all larger churches and cathedrals employed not only professional musicians but the kapellmeister(s) also had to compose new hymns, offertories, masses, etc. damn near every sunday ... not to mention the 'special' Easter and Xmas masses.
Every duke, earl and baron had a court composer and musicians. As well as music teachers for their kids.

There were lots of other composers besides Handel, Bach, Hayden and Mozart. Here's some from the around the 18th century - Johann Christian Bach, capel bond, charles avison, daniel purcell, john hebden, john stanley, joseph gibbs, maurice greene, richard jones, willian boyce, thomas chilcot, micheal festing, thomas linley the younger.
Here's a bigger list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:18th-century_composers
17th cent composers : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:17th-century_composers
16th: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:16th-century_composers
19th: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:19th-century_composers

There was probably more music and musicians around (per capita) because all you had was 'live'.



This is a very interesting topic, an you provide us fantastic information. I always dream in being able to travel in time to know what happened in different periods of time with music. You made me travel with this post.

not on topic but connected to what I said... Have you seen the movie "Midnight in Paris"?


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klasaine
post Oct 22 2013, 04:54 PM
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No, do you recommend it?


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