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> Which Daw Is Right For You?, For beginners and vets
thefireball
post Nov 21 2013, 04:06 AM
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I found this video very good in advice and made me think to myself,
I really don't need Studio One, I'm already familiar with Reaper.
This guy helps people with recording and has some great tutorials using Pro Tools.



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Huargo
post Nov 21 2013, 07:18 AM
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good one
thanks for share!


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Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 21 2013, 09:12 AM
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Great share mate! I think that basically, they all do the same thing, but the difference is made from a certain point on by some options and facilities which are available in one DAW or another. But, yes, the idea is to stick to the one you know how to use and make the best out of it wink.gif


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Darius Wave
post Nov 21 2013, 09:35 AM
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Thanx for Sharing! I think the Daw-thing is simialr to the guitars. Very first guitar You have is very often a reference for all Your further choices...You look for similar neck shape, sacel, finish, sometimes even whole shape smile.gif I started from Cubase and I feel comfortable with it. I've tried reaper and studio one and protools too but didn't dig those...so I'll probably stick to Cubase for a long time...mainly because I stared from it and already know many usefull things


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Nov 21 2013, 11:48 AM
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Yes. I've said for a long time here and elsewhere that people should learn the daw and vst effects and processors that they have rather than just jumping to the next flavour of the month.

About the only times I think you need to jump is if the alternative offers a siginifcantly different workflow that better matches you (i.e. Live! for those who do sample based music a lot), or a very specific professional use (i.e. mastering and a need for accurate framebased PQ).


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Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 21 2013, 02:30 PM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Nov 21 2013, 08:35 AM) *
Thanx for Sharing! I think the Daw-thing is simialr to the guitars. Very first guitar You have is very often a reference for all Your further choices...You look for similar neck shape, sacel, finish, sometimes even whole shape smile.gif I started from Cubase and I feel comfortable with it. I've tried reaper and studio one and protools too but didn't dig those...so I'll probably stick to Cubase for a long time...mainly because I stared from it and already know many usefull things


Good development of the idea here - you are already fast with it - moving to something new will slow you down until you become acquainted at the same level with it and in the case in which the change is not REALLY necessary, you will just be wasting time.


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Monica Gheorghev...
post Nov 21 2013, 04:49 PM
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I'm stick to Ableton but I really want to learn Cubase. I tried but wasn't successful until now. Always I'm very open to learn many programs because I don't like when I need something urgent, to loose time looking for persons who help me. And I like to know everything. Also I want to learn Melodyne. I saw some tips and tricks at one of my friend and was really awesome and in Ableton I can't do that.
But very often, I started to make something in a DAW and even if I don't know how to do that I try every option until I succeed. Of course this is the good part with "succeed" but many times I fail. Last week when I tried to do something new, the things were like this:

" How damn do I make this? Maybe if I push this button I will do that....Ups...what the.....no, no, no....... I must noticed: Never push this button again!!!! ......Hmmm.....God bless "undo" option".

Now, this seems funny but last week was very frustrating smile.gif






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Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 22 2013, 10:30 AM
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I know the feeling Monica - the saddest thing is that, there are times when 'experiments' lead you into something that the Undo button can't work its magic on... happened to me... twice biggrin.gif Some sort of weird window appeared out of nowhere and I couldn't get back to my project. Darn options... laugh.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Nov 23 2013, 12:43 AM
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REAPER is a great choice. It's cross platform and free to download so it's honestly the most compatible choice you could make. Also, the visual paradigm is very similar to other DAWS in many ways. Learning new daws is sorta like learning new languages. It gets easier once you learn the first one smile.gif

For the long term, I'd say maybe try to add PRO TOOLS at some point as an adjunct. Knowing Pro Tools can be very handy since soooooo many pro shops use it.

You'll probably start to notice that many European folks use CUBASE or even NUENDO or ABLETON. While many (not all of course, just generalizing) in the states will use REAPER or PRO TOOLS.

I"m a big fan of LOGIC 9 but sadly it only runs on a mac and it's going away as LOGIC X has replaced it and there will be no more development of LOGIC 9.

Todd





QUOTE (thefireball @ Nov 20 2013, 10:06 PM) *
I found this video very good in advice and made me think to myself,
I really don't need Studio One, I'm already familiar with Reaper.
This guy helps people with recording and has some great tutorials using Pro Tools.




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Gabriel Leopardi
post Nov 23 2013, 04:25 AM
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As everybody said here, most of these softwares do the same thing in different way. The idea is to choose the one that you find more comfortable and go for it. In the past I used Cakewalk 9.0, then I continued with the update that was called Sonar. When we recorded Cirse's first album, I decided to learn the studio's software to help with the edition (I ended mixing that album with Nuendo too). After that I could stop using Nuendo and Cubase which are very similar.


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Nov 23 2013, 11:17 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Nov 23 2013, 12:43 AM) *
...

For the long term, I'd say maybe try to add PRO TOOLS at some point as an adjunct. Knowing Pro Tools can be very handy since soooooo many pro shops use it.

...

Todd


That's true for some pro studios in the US but less so in Europe. With PT it used to be the case that a project made on it needed PT compliant daws for any other downstream work. That's not been the case for quite a while and PT has less of a strangle hold even in the US. How PT got the strangle hold was more to do with hardware/software integration, tech support and product placement reasons arguably much more than anything else. I know quite a few pro engineers who, somewhat unkindly, refer to home studios who use PT as 'Pro fools' based on the assumption that the home studio is just mimicing what they think pros use but with little understanding why or how to use it. Quite a few pro studios will have several daws and any pro engineer should be happy to work with your project whatever daw it's been produced on. It's also worth bearing in mind that PT HD, which is what you find in a pro studio, and PT 'lite', which is aimed at the prosumer/home user, share many common features but not all.


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Get your music professionally mastered by anl AES registered Mastering Engineer. Contact me for Audio Mastering Services and Advice and visit our website www.miromastering.com

Be friends on facebook with us here.

We use professional, mastering grade hardware in our mastering studo. Our hardware includes:
Cranesong Avocet II Monitor Controller, Dangerous Music Liasion Insert Hardware Router, ATC SCM Pro Monitors, Lavry Black DA11, Prism Orpheus ADC/DAC, Gyratec Gyraf XIV Parallel Passive Mastering EQ, Great River MAQ 2NV Mastering EQ, Kush Clariphonic Parallel EQ Shelf, Maselec MLA-2 Mastering Compressor, API 2500 Mastering Compressor, Eventide Eclipse Reverb/Echo.
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Spock
post Nov 23 2013, 02:01 PM
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If it wasn't for Garageband and how easy and intuitive it was, plus it came as bundled Mac OS software, I would have given up a long time ago - especially the old days of programming drums machines and working with a 4 track. But the ease of use is staggering and wonderful!

And then the move from Garageband to Logic 9 and now Logic X was simple.

This post has been edited by Spock: Nov 23 2013, 02:29 PM
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Todd Simpson
post Nov 27 2013, 01:14 PM
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VERY true on all points smile.gif And thanks for bringing this up. There is a bit of a divide in software between EUROPE and THE STATES as I alluded to in my first post. As FIREBALL is in the states, picking up a cheap pro tools combo (usually an interface that serves as the dongle and a copy of some variant of pro tools) would be a handy addition at some point but it's by no means critical. And you don't have to get the latest version either. Due to the fact that Pro Tools locks folks in to certain hardware, many studios here in the states are running older versions on older hardware. Only the top flight shops have the latest version since it requires the latest hardware and is CRAZY pricey.

As Tony mentioned, the Pro tools "lite" doesn't share all the features of the fully blown thing, but will introduce you to the general "pro tools paradigm". I only mention this due to having run in to pro tools over and over every time I leave my little setup and run in to a pro facility. Boom, "you know pro tools right ?". Many folks will just assume it sort of the way some video folks will just assume you have experience on some AVID variant. These are "legacy" systems in a sense and have been replaced in many smaller shops with cheaper options that perform quite well like REAPER, and for video FINAL CUT PRO and or Adobe Premiere.

In short, just to re-iterate, being fluent in a variety of DAW systems is never a bad thing. I'm not saying you should learn them all or go nuts trying to master four or five. But knowing your way around some Pro Tools variant is IMHO a handy thing in general if you are going to be working around/near/in music. That said, I don't run Pro Tools. I run REAPER and the "OLD" version of LOGIC. I've been on pro tools rigs and I can work it enough to get by in a pinch. If you know someone who has a Pro Tools Lite rig, just spending some time on it, will get you most of the way there smile.gif

Todd




QUOTE (tonymiro @ Nov 23 2013, 05:17 AM) *
That's true for some pro studios in the US but less so in Europe. With PT it used to be the case that a project made on it needed PT compliant daws for any other downstream work. That's not been the case for quite a while and PT has less of a strangle hold even in the US. How PT got the strangle hold was more to do with hardware/software integration, tech support and product placement reasons arguably much more than anything else. I know quite a few pro engineers who, somewhat unkindly, refer to home studios who use PT as 'Pro fools' based on the assumption that the home studio is just mimicing what they think pros use but with little understanding why or how to use it. Quite a few pro studios will have several daws and any pro engineer should be happy to work with your project whatever daw it's been produced on. It's also worth bearing in mind that PT HD, which is what you find in a pro studio, and PT 'lite', which is aimed at the prosumer/home user, share many common features but not all.


I agree!! GARAGE BAND was my first DAW smile.gif It's SOOOOOOOOO easy to use it's just wonderful IMHO smile.gif Then you can import your project in to LOGIC once you are ready to make the leap. They have released NEW versions of GARAGE BAND and LOGIC and the new LOGIC is sort of a "pro" garage band it seems, and they are starting to look more similar as well. For better or worse, APPLE is moving toward ProSumer/Mobile with a vengeance. Most of the post production/mixing community was up in arms about it at first, but it's like being mad at the sun for rising. It is what it is and as users, we can take it and adapt or leave it and use something else. So far, I"m making the shift slowly but surely to the new versions smile.gif Switched to FCP X and now I"m headed to the new Garage Band and the new LOGIC.

Todd





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QUOTE (Spock @ Nov 23 2013, 08:01 AM) *
If it wasn't for Garageband and how easy and intuitive it was, plus it came as bundled Mac OS software, I would have given up a long time ago - especially the old days of programming drums machines and working with a 4 track. But the ease of use is staggering and wonderful!

And then the move from Garageband to Logic 9 and now Logic X was simple.


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