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> Top 5 Guitar Books
Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 19 2013, 01:28 PM
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I was just working on a list of reading and learning material for 2014 and when I came down to guitar/music related books, I thought it could make a great discussion topic for us all smile.gif

So, so far, I found this one, which seemed interesting:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Advancing-Guitar...k/dp/0881885894

What would you guys recommend? smile.gif


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PosterBoy
post Dec 19 2013, 05:33 PM
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I have that one

The books I see being recommended again and again are

Ted Greene's Chord Chemisty and Modern Chord Progressions, Steve Kahn's Pentatonic Khancepts, Troy Stetina's Speed Mechanics.

Also Jack Zuckers Sheets of Sound vol 1 & 2

Again if I only had the discipline to go through these books thoroughly I'd be awesome!


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bahadirpeker
post Dec 19 2013, 06:08 PM
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That's a great topic Cosmin! I read The Advancing Guitarist by Mick Goodrich, especially the last pages are awesome! I want to suggest "Guitar Lesson Scott Henderson - Jazz Fusion " dvd. There is also a book with this dvd, according to me this is a real good material about what we can do by using pentatonics over different harmonies. He is very young at this dvd but his style is same like now! By the way I like Scott a lot smile.gif
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PosterBoy
post Dec 19 2013, 07:29 PM
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This one has just been released



LINK


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MonkeyDAthos
post Dec 20 2013, 12:03 AM
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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Dec 19 2013, 06:29 PM) *
This one has just been released



LINK


Oh man thanks biggrin.gif for the info.




i'v got this one from my old guitar teacher called, The Progessive Guitarist - Practical Theory by Don Latarski, it covers a lot a lot of stuff, i'v barely grasp the surface to be honest. I might give it another try.

This post has been edited by MonkeyDAthos: Dec 20 2013, 12:06 AM


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klasaine
post Dec 20 2013, 01:35 AM
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The Goodrick book, The Advancing Guitarist may be the best guitar book ever written.

TGs 'chord chemistry' and 'modern chord progressions' are classics.

I'll add Steve Khan's 'chord khancepts' to posterboy's suggestion.

Also, Joe Diorio's 'fusion' and 'intervallic designs'.

Jon Damien, 'guitarists guide to composing and improvising'.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Dec 20 2013, 05:02 AM
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There are lots of great books... I have Chord Chemistry and Troy Stetina's series and I love them. But I would like to recommend this book because It's my favorite based on theory because it makes this side of music much more interesting:

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http://www.amazon.com/Harmony-Theory-Compr...ds=music+theory


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 20 2013, 05:52 PM
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Haha biggrin.gif Amazing! I knew you guys will come up with a lot of cool concepts! Thank you!

Ken - my mom bought me Jon Damian's book back in 2006, but frankly speaking, I haven't understood anything out of it back then.. I will definitely try it now. New mind, new eyes smile.gif

In the mean time - started scouring 'The advancing guitarist' and man it's great!


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klasaine
post Dec 20 2013, 05:59 PM
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@ Cosmin ... If you're digging on the Advancing Guitarist (and presumably understand what he's talking about) you should be able to re-examine the Jon Damien without too much ( days of wink.gif ) confusion.

General music related texts:

'Reharmonization Techniques' - Randy Felts

'Jazz theory' - Mark Levine (not just for jazz)

'Pentatonic Scales for Jazz Improvisation' - Ramon Ricker (again, not just for jazz) *This book is another 'legendary' text for improvisors.

'Modal Jazz composition and Harmony' Vols. 1 and 2 - Ron Miller

'Horns, Strings and Harmony' - Arthur h. Benade (physics of sound and musical instruments - VERY interesting and not overly academic).

'Gertrude' by Hermann Hesse and 'Pinball' by Jersey Kosinski ... IMO two of the best novels with music and the passion for it, as a character.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 20 2013, 06:16 PM


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Socky42
post Dec 20 2013, 07:31 PM
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The two Guthrie Govan books are pretty interesting and easy to follow.

Creative Guitar 1: Cutting-Edge Techniques
Creative Guitar 2: Advanced Techniques



This post has been edited by Socky42: Dec 20 2013, 07:32 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 21 2013, 02:11 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 20 2013, 04:59 PM) *
@ Cosmin ... If you're digging on the Advancing Guitarist (and presumably understand what he's talking about) you should be able to re-examine the Jon Damien without too much ( days of wink.gif ) confusion.

General music related texts:

'Reharmonization Techniques' - Randy Felts

'Jazz theory' - Mark Levine (not just for jazz)

'Pentatonic Scales for Jazz Improvisation' - Ramon Ricker (again, not just for jazz) *This book is another 'legendary' text for improvisors.

'Modal Jazz composition and Harmony' Vols. 1 and 2 - Ron Miller

'Horns, Strings and Harmony' - Arthur h. Benade (physics of sound and musical instruments - VERY interesting and not overly academic).

'Gertrude' by Hermann Hesse and 'Pinball' by Jersey Kosinski ... IMO two of the best novels with music and the passion for it, as a character.


Haha! biggrin.gif Great pun there Ken tongue.gif I will start with the Advancing guitarist from Monday, after getting rid of the gig tonight and having some rest on Sunday.

@Socky42 - I read Guthrie's books more times than the Bible, I think laugh.gif

I gathered all the interesting titles in this thread and made a list with them biggrin.gif Thanks guys!




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Gabriel Leopardi
post Dec 21 2013, 02:39 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Dec 20 2013, 01:52 PM) *
Haha biggrin.gif Amazing! I knew you guys will come up with a lot of cool concepts! Thank you!

Ken - my mom bought me Jon Damian's book back in 2006, but frankly speaking, I haven't understood anything out of it back then.. I will definitely try it now. New mind, new eyes smile.gif

In the mean time - started scouring 'The advancing guitarist' and man it's great!


I'm curious to know what things is this book adding to you as musician! smile.gif


QUOTE (Socky42 @ Dec 20 2013, 03:31 PM) *
The two Guthrie Govan books are pretty interesting and easy to follow.

Creative Guitar 1: Cutting-Edge Techniques
Creative Guitar 2: Advanced Techniques



Two guitar bibles. smile.gif


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PosterBoy
post Dec 21 2013, 04:32 PM
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Jody Fisher - 30 day guitar workout is often recommended too

William Leavitt - Modern Method 1,2 & 3 is one that is used a lot too, it teaches reading amongst everything else


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 22 2013, 03:08 PM
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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Dec 21 2013, 03:32 PM) *
Jody Fisher - 30 day guitar workout is often recommended too

William Leavitt - Modern Method 1,2 & 3 is one that is used a lot too, it teaches reading amongst everything else


Guess I should finally take the time to practice the William Leavitt method, after putting it away for a few years now... Whew, this thread has amassed some knowledge biggrin.gif Keep 'em comin people!


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PosterBoy
post Dec 22 2013, 04:48 PM
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I'm trying to create a year long curriculum of the things I need to learn and improve etc and go through all the Instructional material I own to get the practice material (I have collected a lot over the years!) and the material to put what I have learnt into a musical context.

I'm at the point where I just need to break things down into weekly and monthly plans with specific goals and schedules.

Collecting all this stuff like the books mentioned doesn't make you a better guitarist but at least you have them to hand when you are ready for them!

It's almost like the quote 'when the student is ready the teacher appears'

When I'm ready (whether that be a change in my attitude and an understanding of what is really needed to improve, the freetime, the ability, an appreciation of the music etc), I will see the value of what is in the books and dvds, and put them to good use.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 23 2013, 08:56 AM
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It's always about a change in attitude man smile.gif Nowadays, information is no longer an issue. The real issues are: The lack of organizing (all that info is piled up and one does not know where to begin and which road to follow for best results) and there's also the lack of discipline, in a lot of situations. So, gathering materials is a good thing, but setting deadlines for finishing them is important and most important, putting the things you learn to good use. What's the use of learning something if you cannot use it or will not use it?


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Dec 24 2013, 01:09 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Dec 23 2013, 04:56 AM) *
It's always about a change in attitude man smile.gif Nowadays, information is no longer an issue. The real issues are: The lack of organizing (all that info is piled up and one does not know where to begin and which road to follow for best results) and there's also the lack of discipline, in a lot of situations. So, gathering materials is a good thing, but setting deadlines for finishing them is important and most important, putting the things you learn to good use. What's the use of learning something if you cannot use it or will not use it?


Yeah, if you don't use it, you forget it and then it has been a waste of time to learn it. Being organized and dedicating time to just incorporate, digest and apply what you read / learnt is very important.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 24 2013, 01:51 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Dec 24 2013, 12:09 PM) *
Yeah, if you don't use it, you forget it and then it has been a waste of time to learn it. Being organized and dedicating time to just incorporate, digest and apply what you read / learnt is very important.


For instance, I gave up sweeping because I never used it - aside a few rare occasions when I performed with the orchestra, otherwise it's useless to me. Articulation, legato and alternate picking are most probably the most important techniques one should know, in my opinion


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Dec 26 2013, 08:15 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Dec 24 2013, 09:51 AM) *
For instance, I gave up sweeping because I never used it - aside a few rare occasions when I performed with the orchestra, otherwise it's useless to me. Articulation, legato and alternate picking are most probably the most important techniques one should know, in my opinion



I have a similar feeling with Sweep Picking. I don't use it very much but I love how it sounds so I try to keep in on shape... maybe one day his day will come. biggrin.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 26 2013, 11:21 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Dec 26 2013, 07:15 PM) *
I have a similar feeling with Sweep Picking. I don't use it very much but I love how it sounds so I try to keep in on shape... maybe one day his day will come. biggrin.gif


Frankly speaking, I haven't actually given this whole thing any thought. At this moment, I think that I wish for my ears to be more developed and my spontaneity in respect to self expression. I think that could be a good goal for 2014 biggrin.gif


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