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> Using Different Modes
jstcrsn
post Dec 31 2013, 01:21 PM
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trying to get more efficient in different modes ,I was wanting to either create , or if we already have a backing track.Having a backing track that has seven chord changes that would allow me to switch to every mode.Other than the vamping the 1 chord of the scale you are in.
Lets just say I am in the key of c , is their a chord pattern that would flow smoothly as possible between the 7 different modes ?
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Andrew Cockburn
post Dec 31 2013, 02:15 PM
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David Walliman created a great lesson that shows all the modes on a single backing track, all with the same root - its a really great way to understand the different modes and how they sound, it really helped me.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guit...ring-the-modes/

It is just a couple of chords for each mode however - finding larger progressions to match all the modes is difficult, as they will be different for each mode.

One way to tackle this would be to pick a root, and write out the chords for each mode and pick some common ones that would match a couple of different modes. The key of course is to keep the same root and avoid relative modes as they will share exactly the same chords.

Having said that - it is really difficult to separate chords and the notes in a modal context. Picking chords common to more than one mode would tend to mask the distinctiveness of the mode itself, and would also be harder to play to - picking distinctive chord changes for each mode is very important in cementing the sound of the mode - this is what David does in his lesson but is actually the opposite of what you are asking for!

This post has been edited by Andrew Cockburn: Dec 31 2013, 02:26 PM


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The Professor
post Dec 31 2013, 03:03 PM
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That's a tough one, finding one progression that sounds cool and works all seven modes. Try this one on C, a favorite of jazzers that we stole from classical cats on this stuff.

Cmaj7 Fmaj7 Bm7b5 Em7 Am7 Dm7 G7 Cmaj7

Check it out and see what you think.


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jstcrsn
post Dec 31 2013, 03:53 PM
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QUOTE (The Professor @ Dec 31 2013, 03:03 PM) *
That's a tough one, finding one progression that sounds cool and works all seven modes. Try this one on C, a favorite of jazzers that we stole from classical cats on this stuff.

Cmaj7 Fmaj7 Bm7b5 Em7 Am7 Dm7 G7 Cmaj7

Check it out and see what you think.

wouldn't even know where to begin to use what modes with what chords
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klasaine
post Dec 31 2013, 05:46 PM
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The modes of C major for Matt's above example.

C ionian (major)
F lydian
B locrian
E phrygian
A aeolian
D dorian
G mixo-lydian
C ionian

Yes, they all contain the same notes (C major scale). The order of the changes are what we call the circle of 4ths.


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The Professor
post Dec 31 2013, 06:44 PM
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Yeah, each chord is from the C major scale, so you can use the modes that Klassaine listed above.


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jstcrsn
post Dec 31 2013, 08:23 PM
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QUOTE (The Professor @ Dec 31 2013, 06:44 PM) *
Yeah, each chord is from the C major scale, so you can use the modes that Klassaine listed above.

lets start in the c major scale, 8 bars improv, so then say I want to move to c phrygian and then to c lydian.
not in any paticular order, just some chording that would help(force my ear ) to change modes
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The Professor
post Dec 31 2013, 08:58 PM
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Yeah if you want to do that, then try this progression so you just change one note each time.

C Lydian
C Ionian
C mixolydian
C Dorian
C aeolian
C Phrygian
C locrian


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