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> Have You Ever Tried To Play On One String?
Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 9 2014, 02:58 PM
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If not... it's about time you tried to smile.gif Join me tonight at the video chat session for an organic approach on learning your instrument! Want to know more? Check out the lesson notes here and join me at 8 PM London time tonight!

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...st&p=671081


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klasaine
post Jan 9 2014, 05:19 PM
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Not just a great exercise but an excellent way to maintain a consistent timbral approach to a melody.
The track I did for the 'less is more' competition thing on the ebow was all on the G string except for four notes near the end.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 11 2014, 03:26 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 9 2014, 04:19 PM) *
Not just a great exercise but an excellent way to maintain a consistent timbral approach to a melody.
The track I did for the 'less is more' competition thing on the ebow was all on the G string except for four notes near the end.


Hehe smile.gif Well, you are definitely accustomed to the power of the results obtained form trying this sort of stuff, right?


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klasaine
post Jan 11 2014, 05:40 PM
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In performance, for slower melodies it absolutely helps to make a line much more cohesive.
Classical guitarists as well as violinists and cellists will utilize the 'one string' approach as much as possible.

As far as a learning tool jazz guitarists will constantly force themselves to use only one string when learning to solo over lots of chords. Also when they (we) feel that our solos are all starting to sound the same. It really helps one get to what's important in the line.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 11 2014, 05:41 PM


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thefireball
post Jan 11 2014, 05:46 PM
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All the time! On the low 8th string! biggrin.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 12 2014, 02:45 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 11 2014, 04:40 PM) *
In performance, for slower melodies it absolutely helps to make a line much more cohesive.
Classical guitarists as well as violinists and cellists will utilize the 'one string' approach as much as possible.

As far as a learning tool jazz guitarists will constantly force themselves to use only one string when learning to solo over lots of chords. Also when they (we) feel that our solos are all starting to sound the same. It really helps one get to what's important in the line.


Great thoughts Ken! I am currently working with the one string approach and I am finding that I am MUCH more aware of where the notes are and what notes to use rather than throwing in things I already knew how to play, more often than not.. That Mick Godrick sure knows our weaknesses tongue.gif


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klasaine
post Jan 12 2014, 04:43 PM
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Some of my favorite things from the book are just his little suggestions:

"7 modes of the major scale - 7 days in a week.
12 keys - 12 months in a year."

There's a new years resolution - all planned out.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 12 2014, 04:45 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 13 2014, 12:38 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 12 2014, 03:43 PM) *
Some of my favorite things from the book are just his little suggestions:

"7 modes of the major scale - 7 days in a week.
12 keys - 12 months in a year."

There's a new years resolution - all planned out.


Bingo! smile.gif So, you have finished it yourself, correct? I think that this book can set a practice schedule awareness more than everything, making you focus on what really matters from a clear perspective.


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klasaine
post Jan 13 2014, 05:29 PM
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You never 'finish' Mick's book. You just start over again wink.gif
*Same with the Ted Greene books.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 13 2014, 05:48 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 14 2014, 08:23 AM
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I suppose that it's the same with Jon Damian's book smile.gif I had a hunch that Mick's is kind of the same in terms of usage - you can always get back to it and in respect to your evolution, it will always be fresh. I haven't yet finished it the first round smile.gif


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Taka Perry
post Jan 14 2014, 08:31 AM
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It's weird how for example playing 15th fret on the low E during has a very different tone from playing 3rd fret on the high E string. The low E strong somehow has a mellower sound..


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 14 2014, 08:40 AM
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QUOTE (Taka Perry @ Jan 14 2014, 07:31 AM) *
It's weird how for example playing 15th fret on the low E during has a very different tone from playing 3rd fret on the high E string. The low E strong somehow has a mellower sound..


Indeed it does smile.gif People are not aware of the richness provided by only one string... I was one of them as well tongue.gif


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klasaine
post Jan 14 2014, 04:34 PM
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QUOTE (Taka Perry @ Jan 13 2014, 11:31 PM) *
It's weird how for example playing 15th fret on the low E during has a very different tone from playing 3rd fret on the high E string. The low E strong somehow has a mellower sound..


Think about it. The low E string is thicker, it has a solid core and also windings around it (sometimes of a different material).
The particular note you're talking about - G - is past the secondary harmonic i.e., above the 12th fret so now the length as well as the tension of the string has changed dramatically.

*If that type of thing interests you check this book out ... http://www.amazon.com/Horns-Strings-Harmon...s/dp/0486273318
The section on the development of the modern piano is particularly elucidating.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 15 2014, 09:32 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 14 2014, 03:34 PM) *
Think about it. The low E string is thicker, it has a solid core and also windings around it (sometimes of a different material).
The particular note you're talking about - G - is past the secondary harmonic i.e., above the 12th fret so now the length as well as the tension of the string has changed dramatically.

*If that type of thing interests you check this book out ... http://www.amazon.com/Horns-Strings-Harmon...s/dp/0486273318
The section on the development of the modern piano is particularly elucidating.


Great explanation there, Ken smile.gif I think that the string thickness and the wound around it says everything!


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klasaine
post Jan 15 2014, 03:39 PM
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The tension is really important too. It influences all the harmonics post the fundamental tone.

*The over-tone dominant (Lydian b7) scale is called that because it occurs naturally and easily as harmonics on or within any vibrating string or rod or tube. The other 5 tones are there but more difficult to produce/hear. The shorter (or longer) your string length, tighter (or looser) the string tension is as well as thickness, determines which harmonics will be more pronounced after the fundamental tone (the main note you first hear) is struck.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 16 2014, 10:33 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 15 2014, 02:39 PM) *
The tension is really important too. It influences all the harmonics post the fundamental tone.

*The over-tone dominant (Lydian b7) scale is called that because it occurs naturally and easily as harmonics on or within any vibrating string or rod or tube. The other 5 tones are there but more difficult to produce/hear. The shorter (or longer) your string length, tighter (or looser) the string tension is as well as thickness, determines which harmonics will be more pronounced after the fundamental tone (the main note you first hear) is struck.


Very interesting - Lydian dominant - that should be 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7 - right? What should I listen to to get a good hang of the flavor of this mode? Any nice recommendations, Ken? Thank you in advance! I am sure that everyone could benefit out of this wink.gif

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Jan 16 2014, 10:33 AM


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klasaine
post Jan 16 2014, 04:38 PM
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McLaughlin, Scofield, Scott Henderson ... it sounds great over any type of Dominant 7th jam.
It's the 4th mode of the melodic minor scale.

The 'Professor' Matt Warnock has a good page on it ... http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/guitar-re...lydian-dominant and this ... http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/5-must-kn...for-jazz-guitar

It's cool to use in a blues progression. A little jazzy/modern sounding but it does have the b5 (technically #11) as well as the b7. The major 3rd gives it an interesting 'lift'. It won't fit over the IV chord though due to that major 3rd. *I like to mix the major and the minor 3rds.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 16 2014, 04:49 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 17 2014, 10:15 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 16 2014, 03:38 PM) *
McLaughlin, Scofield, Scott Henderson ... it sounds great over any type of Dominant 7th jam.
It's the 4th mode of the melodic minor scale.

The 'Professor' Matt Warnock has a good page on it ... http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/guitar-re...lydian-dominant and this ... http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/5-must-kn...for-jazz-guitar

It's cool to use in a blues progression. A little jazzy/modern sounding but it does have the b5 (technically #11) as well as the b7. The major 3rd gives it an interesting 'lift'. It won't fit over the IV chord though due to that major 3rd. *I like to mix the major and the minor 3rds.


Thanks for thee tip man smile.gif I will take some time to delve into this realm, after I manage to get out alive of next week, when we release the new video with my band. Just bookmarked it wink.gif


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