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> Removing Guitar Finish.
ruben_mcn
post Jan 22 2014, 08:44 PM
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Wassup guys long time since i have posted anything! I was thinkin in turning my black Gibson lp studio in to a Gibson lp studio faded, So i want to remove the finish up to the wood and than polish and vernish it up again. Can I do this on my own? what will i need? can it be dangerous for the instrument? unsure.gif

This post has been edited by ruben_mcn: Jan 23 2014, 02:18 PM


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ruben_mcn
post Jan 23 2014, 02:31 AM
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bump


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ruben_mcn
post Jan 23 2014, 12:55 PM
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2x Bump


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Mertay
post Jan 23 2014, 03:55 PM
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I'm reading a local non-english forum and seems its way harder than it looks. I don't know the english term but first of all you need a "heatgun" and sandpaper to remove the the paint, they say if you're only going to do it on your free time it takes about a week do make a nice job.

Then comes that hard part as if you want nitro polishing like original gibsons. If you can find it, applying it isn't easy even for the experienced+you have to do it a few times. They also say its a pretty sticky, dirty procedure.

On the other hand poly polishing (I guess this is the popular kind used on todays guitars) is easier, you can even go to a car repair shop (that paints cars regularly) and they can do it for you.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Jan 23 2014, 03:56 PM


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klasaine
post Jan 23 2014, 06:44 PM
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If you like the sound of the guitar don't do that. It will change the sound and response of the instrument. It is a tough job and you definitely don't want to use poly on it.

*This may or may not be a consideration ... it will also completely diminish the value if you ever want to sell it. It's an american made instrument. It will always retain or appreciate in value as long as you don't irreversibly change things. Just something to think about - ?


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Azzaboi
post Jan 23 2014, 11:42 PM
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These would be the step I would personally take if you really want to that badly:
1) Sell guitar on ebay.
2) Purchase faded guitar.

I believe the faded versions also has different pickups? Might be mistaken, but the tone can completely change and without knowing what your doing, most likely turn it into an expensive paperweight with little to no resale value by using any D.I.Y. techniques. I wouldn't risk it.

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ruben_mcn
post Jan 24 2014, 01:49 PM
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Thanks for the opinions peepz! i will probably just let it be then


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jstcrsn
post Jan 24 2014, 03:27 PM
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QUOTE (ruben_mcn @ Jan 24 2014, 01:49 PM) *
Thanks for the opinions peepz! i will probably just let it be then

I use to refinish tubs that have basically the same finish.It is easy and inexpensive if you already have the tools
mainly being good acid resistance gloves and respirator, these 2 are imperative as very serious stuff can happen if you get the stripper on your skin or inhale to much.I would take it to a local guitar fixerupper and it would probably cost about the same after you had to buy all the necessary stuff
and you would have a guitar you kn ow what it plays like and a quality job
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Darius Wave
post Jan 24 2014, 04:19 PM
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Did it once with my guitar. If You think it's hard and time taking then...make it twice as You think. I was feeling I will quit once I got to the 1/3 of the job. Paint surface is usually very thick. Also...Gibson has a nitro paint and it's harder for sand paper - it act a bit like a glum. Paliurethan paint is harder so it's better for sand paper but...the few milimeters surface is still a challange.


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klasaine
post Jan 24 2014, 04:23 PM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Jan 24 2014, 06:27 AM) *
I would take it to a local guitar fixerupper and it would probably cost about the same after you had to buy all the necessary stuff
and you would have a guitar you kn ow what it plays like and a quality job


Even if you take it to the Gibson factory, it may play well but it won't play the same. They'd take the neck off. The act of re-setting a (set) neck will change the feel. Re-finishing will change the sound. This all may be for the best ... or not. And even Gibson would tell you that.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jan 24 2014, 05:38 PM
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Hi mate! I don't have experience with this but there are many videos at youtube with guys that explain how to do it. Check this video and search more videos there.



And then off course, tell us how was your own experience!


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jstcrsn
post Jan 24 2014, 05:55 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jan 24 2014, 04:23 PM) *
Even if you take it to the Gibson factory, it may play well but it won't play the same. They'd take the neck off. The act of re-setting a (set) neck will change the feel. Re-finishing will change the sound. This all may be for the best ... or not. And even Gibson would tell you that.

this is my opinion , of course they want you to buy another guitar instead of refinishing , you don't have to take the neck off, you could ask the Luthier just to tape it off, I could,just would take a little extra buffing and only you would ever know. No one in the world could ever get me to believe that refinishing the body would tonally make a difference unless someone just went ballistic with refinishing it
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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 25 2014, 02:10 PM
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I have a friend who does this pretty often but smile.gif BUT, he does it with wrecks and transforms them into beauties - I am of course talking about very old and damaged Romanian guitars.. Check his work here - step by step smile.gif

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1...3846&type=1


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klasaine
post Jan 25 2014, 06:14 PM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Jan 24 2014, 08:55 AM) *
No one in the world could ever get me to believe that refinishing the body would tonally make a difference unless someone just went ballistic with refinishing it.


It can and usually does. It's subtle most of the time and sometimes it's even an improvement (when done by a trained pro) but it does change. Unless it's re-done by the same factory the thickness of the paint and lacquer will never be the same as the original. Even at the factory(s) specs on finish change all the time. Not too mention that if you re-finish an older instrument - that's effectively 'dried out' a little - the new finish will absorb into the wood differently. All of this affects resonance. The resonance of even a solidbody affects the tone and the 'feel' of play. I (and many others) speak from experience.
Will everybody notice it? Maybe not - ?

And of course you don't have to but removing the neck makes it way easier (and faster) to strip off and then re-apply a finish neatly.

*The OP is talking about a Gibson Les Paul. Not just some crappy, cheap POS. This is an axe that even if done totally 'pro' and ends up sounding better ... will be totally de-valued.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 26 2014, 04:45 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 26 2014, 02:29 PM
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Most definitely something I would not try on a guitar that I care a lot about smile.gif But I love the sort of cartoonish guitar finishes such as:



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