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> Great Artists Working As Producers
Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 1 2014, 09:25 AM
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I am currently searching for an option regarding the production of our next material - by that, I mean that we were thinking of trying to work with a famous artist in what regards production. We were of course thinking about someone who is deeply rooted in the styles that we like and Facebook came with the answer when the artist posted an announcement regarding production services. It's Clint Lowery from Sevendust - check out his website: http://www.clintlowery.net/workwithclint

Do you guys know any other artists who work with people in general - especially over the internet?




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Taka Perry
post Feb 1 2014, 10:41 AM
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I think everyone will give you different suggestions, so this is a good place to ask people smile.gif I believe Ashe O'Hara from TesseracT is a producer. I can see some similarities in your music between TesseracT. smile.gif Also, Steven Wilson from Porcupine Tree is a producer, he produced many PT albums and also produced a few Opeth albums.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 1 2014, 12:57 PM
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QUOTE (Taka Perry @ Feb 1 2014, 09:41 AM) *
I think everyone will give you different suggestions, so this is a good place to ask people smile.gif I believe Ashe O'Hara from TesseracT is a producer. I can see some similarities in your music between TesseracT. smile.gif Also, Steven Wilson from Porcupine Tree is a producer, he produced many PT albums and also produced a few Opeth albums.


yeah man - but the question is - are Steven Wilson and Ashe O'Hara willing to work with non-big superstars or alien musicians such as Guthrie? laugh.gif


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Feb 1 2014, 02:14 PM
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Not over the internet. All the producers - artist and otherwise - I know prefer to work in person as production often requires face to face communication.


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klasaine
post Feb 1 2014, 06:03 PM
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QUOTE (tonymiro @ Feb 1 2014, 05:14 AM) *
Not over the internet. All the producers - artist and otherwise - I know prefer to work in person as production often requires face to face communication.


+1

It would be one thing if said producer was already familiar with you and your band or had done the previous record but no face to face would make me very nervous.

Start with just one tune for a set and agreed upon price and time frame. If he's a straight shooter, he'll suggest that.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 1 2014, 06:08 PM


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Feb 1 2014, 10:39 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 1 2014, 06:03 PM) *
+1

It would be one thing if said producer was already familiar with you and your band or had done the previous record but no face to face would make me very nervous.

Start with just one tune for a set and agreed upon price and time frame. If he's a straight shooter, he'll suggest that.


Absolutely Ken. To a great extent I'd say the same about online mixining and mastering - avoid any who are not willing to do an attended session or whom you haven't worked with before.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 2 2014, 09:46 AM
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Thank you for the input guys smile.gif I will write him and see if he agrees to work on one song as a tryout - that's probably the best approach here. I think it can be an opportunity, but it can also fail miserably because of many things...


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 2 2014, 07:13 PM
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This is a very interesting topic. I think that there must me lots of musicians that work as producer using interenet. I mostly know the ones from my area which work in person here but some google search could really help to find interesting ones. At first, I would do a list with your favorite musicians and start investigating, starting by the ones who are not big stars, because the price can be very high.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 3 2014, 09:03 AM
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There's also the drummer from Dead Letter Circus, who I kept in touch with smile.gif I was thinking of talking to him about this possibility as well - especially that Dead Letter Circus are pretty close to our style.

I think that every opportunity should be speculated - with care and attention though!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 3 2014, 11:13 AM
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I wonder how a virtual production (via internet) would work. Do you have experience with it?


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klasaine
post Feb 3 2014, 06:27 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Feb 3 2014, 02:13 AM) *
I wonder how a virtual production (via internet) would work. Do you have experience with it?


Similar to laying down a track remotely.
You get sent the track. (As a guitar player I just like a stereo mix). You put down a few parts. In a mix engineer's case - you send him all the tracks and he'd do a mix. Send it back. Get feedback. Do it again.
You can use skype for communicating.
In my experience it actually takes longer to do it this way - unless you completely trust the producer/engineer to do what's best - ?
As you may imagine, monitoring can be problematic - as in do you and all the band members have (at least) the same monitors as the remote mixer/producer(?). Again it's about trust. Do you trust somebody you've never met before and that has never heard your band to mix your record? Also how do you know what said producer 'really' did on the records that you know? Maybe the sound was all the mix engineer, mic placement and the room - ?
Food for thought.

Any producer and/or mix engineer that's worth their salt will 1) ask you for commercially recorded examples of what you think your band should sound like - as far as the recording aesthetic is concerned. 2) offer to mix one tune (for a set fee - either hourly, day or all in).
Both these things are normal and standard either face to face or remotely.

*As an option for you specifically Cosmin ...
Maybe a producer/mixer you like will be working in Europe on a project during this next year? Maybe he or she has a break or down time or may be able to stay longer. Don't be afraid to ask. I've traveled for work to places just because I wanted to go there. I know a studio owner/engineer/producer here in L.A. (Manny Nieto - Breeders, Los Lobos, Trash Talk) who wanted to visit China. He packed up a bunch of gear and traveled around China and Singapore for almost a year recording bands.
Ask - you never know?

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 3 2014, 08:01 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 4 2014, 09:02 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 3 2014, 05:27 PM) *
Similar to laying down a track remotely.
You get sent the track. (As a guitar player I just like a stereo mix). You put down a few parts. In a mix engineer's case - you send him all the tracks and he'd do a mix. Send it back. Get feedback. Do it again.
You can use skype for communicating.
In my experience it actually takes longer to do it this way - unless you completely trust the producer/engineer to do what's best - ?
As you may imagine, monitoring can be problematic - as in do you and all the band members have (at least) the same monitors as the remote mixer/producer(?). Again it's about trust. Do you trust somebody you've never met before and that has never heard your band to mix your record? Also how do you know what said producer 'really' did on the records that you know? Maybe the sound was all the mix engineer, mic placement and the room - ?
Food for thought.

Any producer and/or mix engineer that's worth their salt will 1) ask you for commercially recorded examples of what you think your band should sound like - as far as the recording aesthetic is concerned. 2) offer to mix one tune (for a set fee - either hourly, day or all in).
Both these things are normal and standard either face to face or remotely.

*As an option for you specifically Cosmin ...
Maybe a producer/mixer you like will be working in Europe on a project during this next year? Maybe he or she has a break or down time or may be able to stay longer. Don't be afraid to ask. I've traveled for work to places just because I wanted to go there. I know a studio owner/engineer/producer here in L.A. (Manny Nieto - Breeders, Los Lobos, Trash Talk) who wanted to visit China. He packed up a bunch of gear and traveled around China and Singapore for almost a year recording bands.
Ask - you never know?


Hey Ken - thanks for the advice man - I am glad I did all you said in advance at least for the mixing and mastering, so far!

Gave the examples, made the test song and now guess what laugh.gif Yesterday I wrote to Luke Williams from Dead Letter Circus, to Clint from Sevendust and today I am planning to write to Andre Doucette - a Canadian producer who worked with 30 Seconds To Mars on their 'This is war' album. He came to Romania a few years ago to produce the demo of some friends of mine - guess what, they wanted to sound JUST like 30STM - they failed miserably, because they thought it was the recipe for success...

We'll see what's what tho smile.gif


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Feb 4 2014, 09:24 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 3 2014, 06:27 PM) *
Similar to laying down a track remotely.
You get sent the track. (As a guitar player I just like a stereo mix). You put down a few parts. In a mix engineer's case - you send him all the tracks and he'd do a mix. Send it back. Get feedback. Do it again.
You can use skype for communicating.
In my experience it actually takes longer to do it this way - unless you completely trust the producer/engineer to do what's best - ?
As you may imagine, monitoring can be problematic - as in do you and all the band members have (at least) the same monitors as the remote mixer/producer(?). Again it's about trust. Do you trust somebody you've never met before and that has never heard your band to mix your record? Also how do you know what said producer 'really' did on the records that you know? Maybe the sound was all the mix engineer, mic placement and the room - ?
Food for thought.

Any producer and/or mix engineer that's worth their salt will 1) ask you for commercially recorded examples of what you think your band should sound like - as far as the recording aesthetic is concerned. 2) offer to mix one tune (for a set fee - either hourly, day or all in).
Both these things are normal and standard either face to face or remotely.

*As an option for you specifically Cosmin ...
Maybe a producer/mixer you like will be working in Europe on a project during this next year? Maybe he or she has a break or down time or may be able to stay longer. Don't be afraid to ask. I've traveled for work to places just because I wanted to go there. I know a studio owner/engineer/producer here in L.A. (Manny Nieto - Breeders, Los Lobos, Trash Talk) who wanted to visit China. He packed up a bunch of gear and traveled around China and Singapore for almost a year recording bands.
Ask - you never know?


+1 to everything that Ken says here.

I've done quite a few 'virtual' projects over the years. For what it's worth I find that how well they work really does come down to what Ken says: trust, communication and experience. As a minimum at least one person involved should be experienced - whether the producer or one of the engineers - and the others should trust to that person. On thing to be aware of is the project management and particularly what the different stages are, how they fit together and in what order and who is involved and when. You shouldn't, for instance, expect a mastering engineer to be involved from the start (albeit that I've often commented on early mixes).
If you go this way I would stress that you keep all the files, notes, tracks, raw recordings and mixes etc. Far too often the band/producer only keeps the stereo mix and/or stems and deletes everything else in order to save space. Then they find that the kick dum doesn't quite sit in the drum stem...
There are a lot of 'producers' who have little if any experience. Far too often what little they have was being present in a studio when a project was recorded or mixed as a musician on their own recording.:That does not qualify them a a producer.
Far too many 'engineers' claim experience for session where they were a very junior member: I've seen people claim sessions when they spent all their time looping audio cables in the machine room or taking down the mics after a session. Similarly there are too many mastering engineers who include remasters.
There are also a lot of on-line 'studios' mixing and mastering studios that have no actual equipment but rely on the library presets in software vsts but who post pictures of their 'hardware'. This is why there are so many on-line 'studios' that do not offer attended sessions. If you have any doubt ask them to supply you with a date stamped photo of their hardware that includes something that clearly identifies the studio - i.e. a piece of paper with the studio name/logo, screensaver, the engineer in shot and so on.
A good studio will have appropriate sound treatment so even if you have the same monitors this can still be an issue if you haven't. Even if you do do you have the ecperience to be able to identify issues? It's even more true at mastering when the mastering studio will nearly always have much better monitoring. For on-line sessions and people that I haven't worked with I start by asking if they want a mix critique. If they do then it gives me a base to discuss issues that I can hear but which they may have missed and see if they want them dealt with or not. If they don't want to discuss the mix then ultimately I have to assume that they've accepted the mix and are happy with it, warts and all. Also, and like Ken states, I often like the client to suggest a commerical recording that they like and which they regard as a suitable comparitor for their project.
I'd also add that any producer and studio that really has experience and works 24/7 will be registered for sales tax/VAT/IVA as quite simply if you do sufficient work to earn a living at it then your turnover will make you liable for tax. It also helps demonstrate that the studio does actually exist at the registered address. That way you can have more confidence that it isn't some kid working in their bedroom and also importnatly that the studio will b e there next week/month etc when you want a recall.
Finally be aware that some legitimate studios etc may treat some projects as an 'over night'. Here they will run a lot of projects using a junior engineer to do the work or run a lot of projects with minimal checks on a standard setup out of hours.
It really hekps here if you communicate with the engineers at the start - anyone who isn't happy to talk to you, spend time answering your questions or is unwilling to agree at least one free recall should be avoided. One thing not to do is waste the studios time, by all means ask questions but don't 'dangle the carrot': don't tell a studio that you will use them if you don't intend to, don't make a booking and not turn up, don't book several to 'blind test' with the intention to only pay the one you like.




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Get your music professionally mastered by anl AES registered Mastering Engineer. Contact me for Audio Mastering Services and Advice and visit our website www.miromastering.com

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We use professional, mastering grade hardware in our mastering studo. Our hardware includes:
Cranesong Avocet II Monitor Controller, Dangerous Music Liasion Insert Hardware Router, ATC SCM Pro Monitors, Lavry Black DA11, Prism Orpheus ADC/DAC, Gyratec Gyraf XIV Parallel Passive Mastering EQ, Great River MAQ 2NV Mastering EQ, Kush Clariphonic Parallel EQ Shelf, Maselec MLA-2 Mastering Compressor, API 2500 Mastering Compressor, Eventide Eclipse Reverb/Echo.
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