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> Chord Position Switching
Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 3 2014, 09:43 AM
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We all encounter some trouble in our playing when we need to switch chord positions faster and stay in time, play each note clean and articulated - don't we? smile.gif Well, I found this amazing video of the even more amazing laugh.gif George Benson. Check it out, but pay attention from min 03:21 onwards smile.gif Breathtaking, ain't it? How do you practice your chord position switching?



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Taka Perry
post Feb 3 2014, 10:04 AM
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For me it comes with repeating the action until it is muscle memory. It helps to be able to switch without using your mind too much smile.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 3 2014, 10:32 AM
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What a great musician!! Now I'm listening to one of his albums. smile.gif

It's awesome how fast he switches chords in that part. Playing along with my favorite songs has been my way to practice chord switching since I started playing guitar. I recommend to focus your mind and sight on the next chord a bit before the moment you have to change. And if you want to change as fast as Benson, practice a lot! biggrin.gif


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klasaine
post Feb 3 2014, 06:50 PM
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I had a guitar teacher (coincidentally the one that turned me on to George Benson) that would have me form a chord; lets say an F barre chord at the first fret. While I was holding that F chord he would tell me to imagine what a G (open) chord looked like with my hands forming it on the fretboard. Only when I saw it in my head was I allowed to change to it. Sometimes he would have me strum four beats of the F (or any chord) - visualize the G - and change to the G on beat one of the next bar. Ideally you want all your fingers to move at the same time (there are exceptions to this) and essentially form the chord above the strings and come down on the fretboard in chord formation.
Summary: Play G ... visualize D ... play D.
When I taught private guitar lessons I found that this worked particularly well with kids.

*This is classic 'Zen in the Art of Archery' and 'Inner Game of Tennis' stuff.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 3 2014, 06:52 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 4 2014, 08:40 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 3 2014, 05:50 PM) *
I had a guitar teacher (coincidentally the one that turned me on to George Benson) that would have me form a chord; lets say an F barre chord at the first fret. While I was holding that F chord he would tell me to imagine what a G (open) chord looked like with my hands forming it on the fretboard. Only when I saw it in my head was I allowed to change to it. Sometimes he would have me strum four beats of the F (or any chord) - visualize the G - and change to the G on beat one of the next bar. Ideally you want all your fingers to move at the same time (there are exceptions to this) and essentially form the chord above the strings and come down on the fretboard in chord formation.
Summary: Play G ... visualize D ... play D.
When I taught private guitar lessons I found that this worked particularly well with kids.

*This is classic 'Zen in the Art of Archery' and 'Inner Game of Tennis' stuff.


Sooo smile.gif Ken, are you acquainted with the fine art of Kyudo or even better, Kyu Jutsu? Great approach here smile.gif For me, everything that's played on the guitar should be visualized in anticipation - phrases, chords, as long as the brain knows what's coming next, it will have a lot more confidence smile.gif


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klasaine
post Feb 4 2014, 10:00 AM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 3 2014, 11:40 PM) *
Sooo smile.gif Ken, are you acquainted with the fine art of Kyudo or even better, Kyu Jutsu? Great approach here smile.gif For me, everything that's played on the guitar should be visualized in anticipation - phrases, chords, as long as the brain knows what's coming next, it will have a lot more confidence smile.gif


Only acquainted with what they are. I'm leaving the swordsmanship to you. I did do some archery at camp one summer (loved it!).

What Cosmin is referring to and what works great with martial arts (sports) and musical instrument playing is 'seeing the result' (hopefully positive) before you manifest it.
In other words - if you know where you're going, chances are very good you'll get there.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 4 2014, 10:30 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 5 2014, 08:25 AM
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Great words again Ken and since it's you and your name which means something important in Japanese smile.gif I will give a quote from the great Myiamoto Musashi -> 'When you take up a sword, you must feel intent on cutting the enemy!'

You can read more pickings from his famous book - The book of 5 rings here: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Miyamoto_Musashi

Anyway, visualizing is a powerful tool, but oh so neglected by a lot of folks... I tried it yesterday with some chord shapes on the acoustic guitar and I reconfirmed to myself that it works just like a charm.


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klasaine
post Feb 5 2014, 08:50 AM
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That technique - visualization - is completely incorporated into everything I do on guitar.

My name means something in English too - that I don't always live up to.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 5 2014, 08:53 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 5 2014, 10:15 AM
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Uh oh - you mean Ken like in 'Can' as in I CAN do it? or ...


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klasaine
post Feb 5 2014, 04:57 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 5 2014, 01:15 AM) *
Uh oh - you mean Ken like in 'Can' as in I CAN do it? or ...


Sort of.
It means awareness, understanding, grasp of a concept/situation. As in, "the situation is beyond my ken".

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 5 2014, 04:58 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 6 2014, 08:30 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 5 2014, 03:57 PM) *
Sort of.
It means awareness, understanding, grasp of a concept/situation. As in, "the situation is beyond my ken".


Oohhh, very interesting! This is the first time EVER, that I am hearing this word smile.gif

Is it old English, or...? Isn't it interesting how these two words are connected to each other smile.gif Even tho, Japanese and English are totally unrelated... Swordsmanship involves total awareness all the time...


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klasaine
post Feb 6 2014, 05:22 PM
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Yes, olde english (so the dictionary says).

*Odd (ken) trivia ...
The only father and son to hit back-to-back home runs in a major league baseball game: Ken Griffey, Jr., and his father, Ken Griffey, Sr., both of the Seattle Mariners in a game against the California Angels on September 14th, 1990.
Both outstanding athletes. I can guarantee you they 'saw the result' before it happened.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 6 2014, 05:23 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 7 2014, 09:19 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 6 2014, 04:22 PM) *
Yes, olde english (so the dictionary says).

*Odd (ken) trivia ...
The only father and son to hit back-to-back home runs in a major league baseball game: Ken Griffey, Jr., and his father, Ken Griffey, Sr., both of the Seattle Mariners in a game against the California Angels on September 14th, 1990.
Both outstanding athletes. I can guarantee you they 'saw the result' before it happened.


I am watching a series called 'Once upon a time' in which at some point, a character must believe something in order to make it happen. The whole story is based around this idea in the series, anyway - but the thing is...magic can happen smile.gif If you 'see it happening' and you prepare yourself to be able to make it happen smile.gif I think I am starting to understand some things and damn, us human beings are such wonderful creatures sometimes...


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