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EvsT70
post Feb 15 2014, 10:05 AM
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Hi guys,

I appreciate there will be other (thousands) of similar posts to this. I'll try and personalise this.

I have been playing guitar for about 10 - 12 yrs. but not flat out for that time. Win didn't play much at uni etc. but I have been flat out for the past 5 yrs say. I feel like I am no where near as good as I should/ could be.

I'd love it if there's some kind of guitarist bio/practice/experiences book out there. So I can read what others have done to push themselves.

I am in a indie/rock band. Lead guitarist. So I think I'm doing ok. But I want to get off this plateau that I'm in.

I practice sweeps, legato, staccato, arpeggio exercises.

I'm a massive fan of Ben Higgins on here, but I'm nowhere near his ability.

I know there's not magic plectrum, or trick, answer or advice.

But is there an in depth book, or blog out there? Has anybody else climbed out of similar plateau?

Thanks

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Ben Higgins
post Feb 15 2014, 10:14 AM
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I don't know of any books about that, most musical auto biographies usually skip the actual musical stuff ! rolleyes.gif

I usually find that plateaus and slumps occur when we don't have a reason for what we're doing.

Having a band to play in is cool but I bet that being in an indie rock band there is little need for sweeps, picking etc.. so you might possibly have a conflict between what you're playing and what you want to play ?

The best way out of the forest is not to focus on wide, all encompassing goals but very small steps instead. Maybe spend a week on just one technique or lick ?

If you have small, achievable (almost easy) goals then you increase your chances of actually achieving them and then giving yourself motivation. As guitarists, we need to see results don't we or we get discouraged ? smile.gif So the best way to give yourself results is set goals that you KNOW you can complete in a few days or a week's worth of practise.

This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Feb 15 2014, 10:15 AM


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EvsT70
post Feb 15 2014, 10:25 AM
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Thanks dude.

Agreed. There is a conflict in styles. I love metal. I hate my band's music! Ha! But they are my best mates and I love being in the band. I spend about 50% of my time writing for the band. But the other 50% is spent working on the techniques I'd love to play properly.



Ben, if you had to keep one of your lessons on here, which one would it be? I'll spend my time entirely focusing on that... (I bet people like me really annoy you guys ha!)
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Ben Higgins
post Feb 15 2014, 11:15 AM
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QUOTE (EvsT70 @ Feb 15 2014, 09:25 AM) *
Thanks dude.

Agreed. There is a conflict in styles. I love metal. I hate my band's music! Ha! But they are my best mates and I love being in the band. I spend about 50% of my time writing for the band. But the other 50% is spent working on the techniques I'd love to play properly.



Ben, if you had to keep one of your lessons on here, which one would it be? I'll spend my time entirely focusing on that... (I bet people like me really annoy you guys ha!)


If this makes you feel any better the first band I was in was an indie band as well tongue.gif I didn't last long ! But it's good experience for jamming with others and working on your timing and other things. And if you enjoy it then there's no problems.

Hmm, good question. I can't pick only one... so I'd probably choose
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Michael-Schenker-Style/
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Marty-Friedman-Rocks/
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Jason-Becker-Style/

And of course the 2 30 Shredders big lessons wink.gif



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Mertay
post Feb 15 2014, 03:39 PM
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Even while giving a break, the musical personality still evolves. There's no reason why you can't start connecting the creativity, style thats hidden in you while practising guitar.

Actually, during the process you'll realise your technical needs better and start focusing on adaptation since you'll have more focused personal goals. This means the practicing starts to get musical project dependent and leads to an even faster evolution of your playing.

With such realization you'll easily start playing better than you were before in lesser time required than you think smile.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 15 2014, 05:16 PM
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Hi mate! I think that Ben has given you really useful ideas to give a direction to you practice. I consider important a diary practice, that's the only way I eel you can see improvements in your playing, and that's why I base my guitar learning and teaching on designing guitar sessions that changes every week. As Ben said, setting weekly goals and designing a program to achieve them is a good way to become a better guitarist and musician. I don't know a book about that, but I think that you have everything here at GMC: Great lessons, theory stuff, collaborations and instructors ready to be you mentors. smile.gif


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klasaine
post Feb 15 2014, 06:20 PM
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If you ask 50 different professional guitarists (musicians) how they do what they do and how they got where they got ... you'll get 50 different stories. All good, all right, all different.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 15 2014, 06:20 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 16 2014, 09:13 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 15 2014, 05:20 PM) *
If you ask 50 different professional guitarists (musicians) how they do what they do and how they got where they got ... you'll get 50 different stories. All good, all right, all different.


Bingo smile.gif Ken said it right! I myself have learned from a lot of people over the years and I have always received valuable things. Now, here at GMC you can take advantage of these things from all of us smile.gif I for one, am running this program which you might find interesting wink.gif Take a look here: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...t=0&start=0

.. and write me if you think you're in smile.gif

Cosmin

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Darius Wave
post Feb 17 2014, 10:21 AM
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Unfortunately Ken's post is short, but says it all. I can only say that in case of technical stuff there is only one common truth:
A lot of regular and wise practice.

What is wise practice?

1. Think of what You're doing at the moment, don't let the fingers just flow randomly
2. If You can't handle one lick from 3 minutes song - don't play the whole song 15 times. Spend a month on one lick and then go back to the whole song
3. If You're on the level 3 and You want to master level 10 lick You have to be conscious that even after a month of practicing You still might not be able to play it and it's not Your fault. It's just a time and experience we get through Years learning tips, that work for our own body.
4. You can spend hours of practice everyday through a few years and still get no progress - that happens as well if You just play without detailed analysis of "why this doesn't work"
5. physical health has a lot to do with our technical possibilities. If You have a whole day long of hard working it very possible You won't be able to shred whole night long. Tired body - tired playing. Shred is indeed a bit sport-like. Good warm up, good condition makes You play relaxed.


There is probably much more of those but basicly all about the time and way we practice + our physical abilities


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MonkeyDAthos
post Feb 17 2014, 11:00 AM
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QUOTE (EvsT70 @ Feb 15 2014, 09:25 AM) *
Thanks dude.

Agreed. There is a conflict in styles. I love metal. I hate my band's music! Ha! But they are my best mates and I love being in the band. I spend about 50% of my time writing for the band. But the other 50% is spent working on the techniques I'd love to play properly.



I feel confused, you spend 50% of your time writing for the band yet you hate your band's music? So you are writting things you hate?
I would feel frustated as hell (I know that some people need every kind of incoming that might come), if it was me, even with best friends and what not i would probably say nope i am out.

Few years ago, i was playin in a small local music fest with a band i was like playing for a year and i realized, i wasn't having any fun, i wasn't putting my max to the gig, i was just lying to myself and to the people that were watching. That was my last gig with that band.

I do agree with Darius 100% also try to surrender yourself or meet people who are aiming to do something heavylish metul, you will probably feel happier and feeling happy with the work you are doing is something that feels really awesome. tongue.gif.


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Todd Simpson
post Feb 17 2014, 01:13 PM
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This is some seriously great advice smile.gif Well said!!! Also, TAKE HEART!! This question comes up more often than you might think and your experiences are shared by many if not all here at GMC at some point in their journey towards becoming "Better".

Follow Ben's advice here and you can work through the slumps/plateaus, as they too are a natural part of the process. Not a fun part, but a natural part none the less smile.gif

I feel your pain on playing in a band your not in love with. Thankfully, there is usually something to like in nearly every band. In this case it's jamming with your mates smile.gif I was a bass player in a blues band for a while (The Dillon James Band), then a guitar player in a Girl fronted indie rock band (Skye Clad), etc. and in each one there was something that made it worth doing and something to take away when it was over.

So relish the experiences as they come, be patient with yourself, and try to break things down in to small enough bits that each one is something you can do without stressing. Music is a wonderful thing and sometimes we get so driven to move forward we forget to enjoy it ;0)

Todd

QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 15 2014, 04:14 AM) *
I don't know of any books about that, most musical auto biographies usually skip the actual musical stuff ! rolleyes.gif

I usually find that plateaus and slumps occur when we don't have a reason for what we're doing.

Having a band to play in is cool but I bet that being in an indie rock band there is little need for sweeps, picking etc.. so you might possibly have a conflict between what you're playing and what you want to play ?

The best way out of the forest is not to focus on wide, all encompassing goals but very small steps instead. Maybe spend a week on just one technique or lick ?

If you have small, achievable (almost easy) goals then you increase your chances of actually achieving them and then giving yourself motivation. As guitarists, we need to see results don't we or we get discouraged ? smile.gif So the best way to give yourself results is set goals that you KNOW you can complete in a few days or a week's worth of practise.


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EvsT70
post Feb 17 2014, 10:03 PM
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Thanks Dudes!! What a great list of replies. Yes, it's right to say that I get a lot of enjoyment jamming in my band with my mates. I used to be in a metal band. But this band, I'm playing bigger gigs, better venues, to crowds I thought I'd never be playing to. It is right to say I dislike the music, but I love jamming. I love guitar so it's not a chore.

Thank you for the responses. Very interesting reading your thoughts.

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klasaine
post Feb 18 2014, 01:10 AM
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QUOTE (EvsT70 @ Feb 17 2014, 01:03 PM) *
Thanks Dudes!! What a great list of replies. Yes, it's right to say that I get a lot of enjoyment jamming in my band with my mates. I used to be in a metal band. But this band, I'm playing bigger gigs, better venues, to crowds I thought I'd never be playing to. It is right to say I dislike the music, but I love jamming. I love guitar so it's not a chore.

Thank you for the responses. Very interesting reading your thoughts.


This is not at all an uncommon situation, especially among those making a living at it. It's one of the reasons most pros play in more than one band even if it's only during their 'off' time.
It's very rare that you'll find 'the perfect' musical situation that 1) satisfies all your artistic passion, 2) you love all your band mates, 3) the gigs are all good and 4) actually pays you something. Generally, if you've got two of those, then your styling! As well as happy in the situation even when not loving all the music. As you said you love guitar so it's not a chore. Try to never ever lose that attitude. It will serve you well.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Feb 18 2014, 01:13 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 18 2014, 09:51 AM
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As Ken said - the ideal situation is something VERY rare smile.gif I am sure that even those few who were blessed enough to have success and make it big for what they created. BUT smile.gif I am sure that even they have some things to complain about - I was watching an interview with the guys in Sevendust. They are talking about life on the road and how keeping their band going is taking them away from their families for very lengthy periods of time.

I guess that this could be an inconvenient at a point smile.gif



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