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> After Passing The Rec
Marek Rojewski
post Mar 31 2014, 07:20 PM
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Hi everyone! I would like to ask everyone a question about their ways of practicing lessons and submitting for REC.
In my personal experience when I submit a lesson for REC and pass the voting I start to learn something new and stop playing/improving the lesson that I've passed.

Reasons for that - so many great lessons and not enough time to learn them all. And I genuinely think that playing more lessons will result in a better "musicality".

Am I alone on that, or is this more like the common approach? Surely after getting many good tips what to improve in that certain lesson, I'll be able to practice that and play it better...

I feel that I "mess around" too little with the general side of the lesson, like trying to play something similar on the lesson backing or mixing my own playing with the lesson, but that improving a 7,5-8,0 graded lesson up to 10,0 grade isn't as rewarding as learning another one (both objectively and subjectively).


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Amitai Kedmi
post Mar 31 2014, 08:42 PM
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Exactly what I'm doing.
I think that no one expects you to keep trying and going for a 10 (Maybe I'm wrong huh.gif ).
The amount of time that is required to get a lesson from great to perfect is more time than starting a new one and getting to a good level of performance, in my opinion.
There are so many awesome lessons, with different techniques and playing styles, and I want to learn all of them!
And the funny thing is that lessons keep coming faster than I can learn all of them laugh.gif .

So I just focus on having a good time, that's the simple way smile.gif

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jstcrsn
post Mar 31 2014, 08:56 PM
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QUOTE (Marek Rojewski @ Mar 31 2014, 07:20 PM) *
(both objectively and subjectively).

agreed , why do we do this

QUOTE (Amitai Kedmi @ Mar 31 2014, 08:42 PM) *
So I just focus on having a good time, that's the simple way smile.gif

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Darius Wave
post Mar 31 2014, 11:04 PM
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That's pretty normal smile.gif I think most important thing about playing is not to get bored because of doing one thing constantly smile.gif You are the one who decide where is the finish line. Sometimes we learn song/lessons and abandon them. After some time we go back to recheck our skills if previously we were not able to execute all of what has been played there smile.gif


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dcz702
post Apr 1 2014, 02:01 AM
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QUOTE (Marek Rojewski @ Mar 31 2014, 06:20 PM) *
Hi everyone! I would like to ask everyone a question about their ways of practicing lessons and submitting for REC.
In my personal experience when I submit a lesson for REC and pass the voting I start to learn something new and stop playing/improving the lesson that I've passed.

Reasons for that - so many great lessons and not enough time to learn them all. And I genuinely think that playing more lessons will result in a better "musicality".

Am I alone on that, or is this more like the common approach? Surely after getting many good tips what to improve in that certain lesson, I'll be able to practice that and play it better...

I feel that I "mess around" too little with the general side of the lesson, like trying to play something similar on the lesson backing or mixing my own playing with the lesson, but that improving a 7,5-8,0 graded lesson up to 10,0 grade isn't as rewarding as learning another one (both objectively and subjectively).

Great topic. I'm also curious on members approach to the lessons.
I know what you mean by passing and moving on, cause I was doing the same thing. And for awhile It seemed like I was trying to submit as many recs as fast as I could learn them, but felt I was missing the point of the lesson, and right after I would move on I would soon forget the lesson I previously submitted.
When I would go to my bookmarks I would see the old lessons play them and struggle to play from memory. That's when I thought if I can't remember the riff or the licks I just learned maybe I'm missing the point. That's when I went back played them over and got them stuck in my head so I can play them whenever I want , every lesson I've done. I even practice them in different keys, I have a library of licks and riffs that I could recall at anytime. Paying close attention to the Comments and suggestions from the instructors. I think breaking down lessons into riffs and licks then practicing them over and over in different keys is a better way for me to approach the lesson without feeling like I'm playing the same thing over and over. I play lessons I first learned when I first joined this way now. And I think I get more out of it this way. smile.gif

This post has been edited by dcz702: Apr 1 2014, 02:11 AM
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klasaine
post Apr 1 2014, 04:26 AM
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When I took lessons, after I'd initially learned - not necessarily mastered - but competently 'learned' one of my lessons, I would immediately work to incorporate that technique into something/anything/everything else I was doing musically. I was lucky. I started jamming and playing with other kids in bands almost immediately so when I learned a new scale, lick, riff, chord, chord progression, etc. just by necessity I figured out a way to adapt it or part of it to a song(s) we were jamming on. Most of the time it would morph completely from how I originally learned it - again, by necessity - in order for me to fit it into the song we were doing. I found that by doing this I wouldn't forget or lose the original technique and would become part of my playing.
You know - use it or lose it.

To this day I still do that. I learn something new - I force it to fit into as much stuff as I can knowing full well that it won't musically or tastefully work in probably 95% of the situations I introduce it in to. But that's the process.

Bob Dylan was once asked how he writes songs. He replied, "I start out playing something I know, change it up until it turns into something I don't know".

If you write - even just a little bit - take a technique or riff that you learn here, change a couple notes, leave out a note, change the key, play it backwards, etc. ... voila, new song!

It's way way better to be able to effectively use - in making music - two or three of the things you learn than it is to know 50 different techniques and 1000 licks but have no idea where to use them or how to make music out of them. Or as another great musician said, "I'd rather be able to use 6 chords in 100 different ways than a hundred chords, six ways".

This post has been edited by klasaine: Apr 1 2014, 04:54 AM


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Monica Gheorghev...
post Apr 1 2014, 07:03 AM
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I have a little different opinion smile.gif
If I not pass a lesson with 10, for me it means that something I still do it wrong. Maybe I understand the technique behind but something I still play wrong and this is not good for me. It's true that I never became bored when I make a lesson because I always choose with Darek a lesson that I like very much and fits with my level. This is the hard part for us smile.gif I love many lessons from the high level but are impossible for my current level.
It's not a challenge for me to finish a lesson very quickly and I will never hurry with a lesson, but it's a big challenge for me to do it in a right way. With my take from REC I worked with Darek a lot of time (more than 1 month, daily, a lot hours) and we worked every detail from every bar. One week I worked many hours/day for 1 single lick. I didn't played anything else, just that damn lick but I was never bored. I have a good training for this because when I was a child my piano teacher always put me to play the same part for many hours until everything sounds for a 10 grade in exam. This is already a habit for me and I was trained in this way. Usually when I make something a lot of time and still didn’t sounds good, I cry like a baby because I became very angry but I never give up and it never became boring wink.gif I take a break, smoke a cigarette and start again with the same part smile.gif
After I finish a lesson I make an improv in my style and my vision. I try to use many things learned from lesson as separately technique. I mean I will not use a lick from lesson but I use the technique in my stuff. This is my way to be sure that what I learned in lesson it's glued and I can apply all these in my style.
Next step another lesson at other level smile.gif
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 1 2014, 04:35 PM
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As Darius said, the main goal is to keep motivated and practicing. If you reach a good level with the lesson and you want to go to another lesson there is no problem with that. You keep on practicing, you keep on motivated and you keep on learning new things and improving. That's the main goal at GMC so keep going Marek!


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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 2 2014, 07:50 AM
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Sometimes, to bring a lesson up to be graded with a 10 is not that easily achieved. Why? You might ask - because we are all different and your touch is different than mine, mine is different than Gabi's and his is different than Darius'

The whole idea is to understand principles and how they are applied in technique, phrasing and so on. Being a perfectionist is a great thing, but you also need to understand that if you play these flawlessly and then you forget them, you have learned them for nothing. As Ken says, use it or lose it!

In order to progress by using these lessons, you need to make sure you understood the applied theory behind the lesson, its principles, the technique and then, as Gabi always suggests, take the time to modify all these over the provided backing track. You will suddenly discover how you can take a level 2 beginner lesson up to incredible heights.

DO take the time to explore and think smile.gif Don't expect all things to be given to you by an all knowing grandfather of all knowledge, but be curious and always push yourselves. And yes, ask questions about what you are doing. There's nothing wrong with that, au contraire, it's the way in which you achieve things.

Here's a thread in which you can read A LOT about how to milk a concept down to the bone: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=51607

There's a Zen proverb that says: 'When you have reached the top, keep climbing'

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Apr 2 2014, 07:50 AM


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Marek Rojewski
post Apr 2 2014, 09:00 AM
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I like that proverb Cosmin, all in all Zen has provided us with many great proverbs wink.gif


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Palacios
post Apr 2 2014, 03:08 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Mar 31 2014, 08:26 PM) *
When I took lessons, after I'd initially learned - not necessarily mastered - but competently 'learned' one of my lessons, I would immediately work to incorporate that technique into something/anything/everything else I was doing musically. I was lucky. I started jamming and playing with other kids in bands almost immediately so when I learned a new scale, lick, riff, chord, chord progression, etc. just by necessity I figured out a way to adapt it or part of it to a song(s) we were jamming on. Most of the time it would morph completely from how I originally learned it - again, by necessity - in order for me to fit it into the song we were doing. I found that by doing this I wouldn't forget or lose the original technique and would become part of my playing.
You know - use it or lose it.

To this day I still do that. I learn something new - I force it to fit into as much stuff as I can knowing full well that it won't musically or tastefully work in probably 95% of the situations I introduce it in to. But that's the process.

Bob Dylan was once asked how he writes songs. He replied, "I start out playing something I know, change it up until it turns into something I don't know".

If you write - even just a little bit - take a technique or riff that you learn here, change a couple notes, leave out a note, change the key, play it backwards, etc. ... voila, new song!

It's way way better to be able to effectively use - in making music - two or three of the things you learn than it is to know 50 different techniques and 1000 licks but have no idea where to use them or how to make music out of them. Or as another great musician said, "I'd rather be able to use 6 chords in 100 different ways than a hundred chords, six ways".

I think that's very true. As soon as I learn a lesson; I like messing around with it to make it unique. smile.gif
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klasaine
post Apr 2 2014, 04:08 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Apr 1 2014, 11:50 PM) *
There's a Zen proverb that says: 'When you have reached the top, keep climbing'


Beautiful!

*Jazz pianist Keith Jarrett once remarked in an interview that there are no masters, only students. Some students work harder than others.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 2 2014, 08:21 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Apr 2 2014, 03:50 AM) *
Sometimes, to bring a lesson up to be graded with a 10 is not that easily achieved. Why? You might ask - because we are all different and your touch is different than mine, mine is different than Gabi's and his is different than Darius'

The whole idea is to understand principles and how they are applied in technique, phrasing and so on. Being a perfectionist is a great thing, but you also need to understand that if you play these flawlessly and then you forget them, you have learned them for nothing. As Ken says, use it or lose it!

In order to progress by using these lessons, you need to make sure you understood the applied theory behind the lesson, its principles, the technique and then, as Gabi always suggests, take the time to modify all these over the provided backing track. You will suddenly discover how you can take a level 2 beginner lesson up to incredible heights.

DO take the time to explore and think smile.gif Don't expect all things to be given to you by an all knowing grandfather of all knowledge, but be curious and always push yourselves. And yes, ask questions about what you are doing. There's nothing wrong with that, au contraire, it's the way in which you achieve things.

Here's a thread in which you can read A LOT about how to milk a concept down to the bone: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=51607

There's a Zen proverb that says: 'When you have reached the top, keep climbing'



Cosmin is a very wise man. Be clever and take his words and that beautiful Zen Proverb! smile.gif


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Jim S.
post Apr 3 2014, 03:04 AM
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Since being here I took a stab at 3 lessons. Darius heavy funkin 2 and Dorian phrases and Cosmins winter Vivaldi. Although I never got a passing grade (6.5-7 tops), but I learned that my technique and timing were biggest problem areas which caused the low score. Since then I have been working on things that made me feel like I was starting over. I still remember every lick slowly and go back to them often.

For instance, I go back to the licks from the lessons that challenged me and see how I've progressed. Some of them are still very challenging but without these lessons I wouldn't know how to prioritize my practice. I have also realized a humbling sense to try harder at achieving my goals. This is a lifelong relationship with its ups and downs.
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Darius Wave
post Apr 3 2014, 08:54 AM
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QUOTE (Jim Seekford @ Apr 3 2014, 03:04 AM) *
Since being here I took a stab at 3 lessons. Darius heavy funkin 2 and Dorian phrases and Cosmins winter Vivaldi. Although I never got a passing grade (6.5-7 tops), but I learned that my technique and timing were biggest problem areas which caused the low score. Since then I have been working on things that made me feel like I was starting over. I still remember every lick slowly and go back to them often.

For instance, I go back to the licks from the lessons that challenged me and see how I've progressed. Some of them are still very challenging but without these lessons I wouldn't know how to prioritize my practice. I have also realized a humbling sense to try harder at achieving my goals. This is a lifelong relationship with its ups and downs.



That's great You see things this way smile.gif I think it's awesome to have a purpose while practicing. You gave Yourself a reference and You'll trying to reach it. Even If You're still not able to reach them I can truly say You made a progress since the time we spoke about very first Heavy Funkin' take. Well do Jim smile.gif I'm sure we'll celebrate You're pass on this lesson soon smile.gif


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SpaseMoonkey
post Apr 3 2014, 11:23 AM
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At least you make it to a REC, I tend to stop before I even feel accomplished into posting one.

I have the same feeling tho, get a little bored or side tracked with working on something else. It doesn't stop me
tho, I don't stop say learning that technique but find something that is harder and more out of of reach. I always
like to feel that challenge for certain techniques, while there are some I feel afraid of because it may not fit my
style of playing.

Anymore I tend to get lost in trying to solo over the work myself, using what I learned in the lesson and just to
expand upon it with my own material. That way I can see how it fits in with what I hear in my head, which for me
it makes it so easy to just pull a technique out of my head and lay a track down.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 3 2014, 10:53 PM
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QUOTE (SpaseMoonkey @ Apr 3 2014, 10:23 AM) *
At least you make it to a REC, I tend to stop before I even feel accomplished into posting one.

I have the same feeling tho, get a little bored or side tracked with working on something else. It doesn't stop me
tho, I don't stop say learning that technique but find something that is harder and more out of of reach. I always
like to feel that challenge for certain techniques, while there are some I feel afraid of because it may not fit my
style of playing.

Anymore I tend to get lost in trying to solo over the work myself, using what I learned in the lesson and just to
expand upon it with my own material. That way I can see how it fits in with what I hear in my head, which for me
it makes it so easy to just pull a technique out of my head and lay a track down.


Thank you gentlemen! I am not as wise as I may seem smile.gif Sometimes I find myself wondering what the hell am I doing? laugh.gif

Spase - you are an explorer, which is great! Just lose the part with getting lost smile.gif Aim for something and make it a tangible goal in your playing - I want to learn the arpeggio shape that Gabriel used in his lesson and apply it over another progression in two octaves, using 16th notes and sweep picking smile.gif I think that that's how your mind should work in that particular point wink.gif


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