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> Rock Around The World
Josh Adams
post Apr 5 2014, 02:16 PM
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It still amazes me how one type of music can end up on every corner of the world and come out in so many different forms (don’t ask me why I’m so astounded by this very basic thing, I just am haha).

I was just thinking about whether anyone thought that certain areas of the world do certain types of rock better, or whether any of the popular rock stereotypes actually had any substance to them. I know there’s a lot of Scandinavians on here and I know you guys are pretty avid rock fans as rock fans go (as a generalisation) – not to mention all the pop songs you’ve contributed to English-speaking music. Check this article on just what the Swedes have done for American pop.

One stereotype of Scandinavians though is that you’re obsessed (and also pretty decent) at the heavier side of the rock spectrum: Death metal etc.

Another one (I guess) is that North Americans (US & Canada) are stadium rockers. Which I think is unfair and is largely because we tend to think of them as big, grand, expensive, flashy rock n’ rollers when compared to the rest of the world and our comparatively humbler origins. Which is complete tripe.

UK and Ireland? I don’t really know what the stereotypes are or what the outside thoughts on this area is since I’m from this part of the world. I also don’t feel particularly comfortable throwing together the UK and Ireland into one package either -- but if I’m uncomfortable doing that I should feel uncomfortable throwing together other areas so I’ll shut up haha! Ireland isn’t all U2 and The Boomtown Rats, obviously. Personally I love it when Irish artists sing in their own accents and bring in some of that traditional Celtic sound. I’ve been hearing that a lot recently and I’m beginning to associate that more and more with Ireland.

Latin America seems to be chucking rock around all over the place, which I love. Over the years they seem to have thrown up some really popular bands in their part of the world that have incorporated things like Afro-beats and stereotypical “Latin” sounds and mixed those with the “traditional” way of doing rock.

When it comes to Asia (I know Asia is HUGE but forgive me) the prevailing theme in articles I’ve read about the more affluent parts of China and India is that bands do tend to work largely along American/European formulas. Also replicating a lot of Western youth subcultures too. Admittedly I haven’t given much time to these sounds but it’d be interesting to hear if anyone has any other experiences.

As with other areas like the Carribbean, other parts of Asia, The Middle East, Africa (I know it’s huge and I’ve entirely missed it out but I have zilch knowledge in this area) and places like Australia and New Zealand: I don’t know much. It would be interesting if anyone had any thoughts on what stereotypes people had of rock music from these places. And what regional sounds/subgenres they might associate with them.
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 5 2014, 08:03 PM
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Good post mate! I find this type of analysis very interesting and let me say that you have been precise when you talked about Latin American rock. People here loves music from U.S. and Europe but when it comes to our local music, the most popular bands are those that mix rock with Latin folk influences. The language is a big limitation for latin bands to be known in the whole country.

But we had also some Brazilian bands which decided to sing in English and became so big. Brazilian people has less prejudice with local bands singing in English, this doesn't happen in other Latin American countries.



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Josh Adams
post Apr 10 2014, 10:16 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Apr 5 2014, 07:03 PM) *
Good post mate! I find this type of analysis very interesting and let me say that you have been precise when you talked about Latin American rock. People here loves music from U.S. and Europe but when it comes to our local music, the most popular bands are those that mix rock with Latin folk influences. The language is a big limitation for latin bands to be known in the whole country.

But we had also some Brazilian bands which decided to sing in English and became so big. Brazilian people has less prejudice with local bands singing in English, this doesn't happen in other Latin American countries.



That's so weird how in one country people aren't bothered by English singing, whilst in one next door people are. I always thought the French were suspicious of English-speaking pop music, but then I know quite a few French artists who are quite happy of the fact they use English in their music...
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Todd Simpson
post Apr 10 2014, 11:24 PM
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SEPULTURA is a great example of a metal band taking local influence and creating something killer with it smile.gif The brazillian instruments, percussion, etc. were part of what made them great. If they had not sung in english, just in portugese, I doubt if I'd ever had heard of them sadly. Some bands like TYR do a great job of blending native and english tongues. For example my fav song of theirs is sung entirely in their mother tongue!!! SINKLARS VISA






QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Apr 5 2014, 03:03 PM) *
Good post mate! I find this type of analysis very interesting and let me say that you have been precise when you talked about Latin American rock. People here loves music from U.S. and Europe but when it comes to our local music, the most popular bands are those that mix rock with Latin folk influences. The language is a big limitation for latin bands to be known in the whole country.

But we had also some Brazilian bands which decided to sing in English and became so big. Brazilian people has less prejudice with local bands singing in English, this doesn't happen in other Latin American countries.




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