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> Great Article On Making A Living In Music From Periphery Drummer
Todd Simpson
post Apr 11 2014, 01:52 AM
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While it remains a huge challenge for everyone, it's a noble goal to shoot for. Of course, I"m talking about "Making a living making music". In this article, the drummer from PERIPHERY gives some truly sage advice smile.gif They came up from nothing and like the rest of us, used EZ drummer, reaper and even PODS to make their first recorded music.

Here is the link
http://www.decibelmagazine.com/featured/ho...h.7nq9oTB5.dpuf


Understand what you’re getting yourself into — AND FULLY COMMIT

This business is hard, and you need to be prepared to invest a lot of time and energy. Realistically, it’s going to take years of hard work for your band to make it, so exercise patience and just focus on being productive every day.

Find the right partners in crime

It all starts with having the right bandmates. Some bands consists of a bunch of best friends, others consist of the right players. For others, it’s a business relationship. If you don’t surround yourself with people who you get along with, can communicate with, and who are dedicated, then you’re screwed from the beginning. Find people who can play, have the same artistic vision, and who are willing to put in the work. Dont be afraid to change your lineup early on if someone isn’t working out — it’s better for the group to weed out the weak links.

Have a direction, and be yourself

With more bands than ever putting their music out, it’s easy for your music to get lost in the shuffle. Your music should stand out from the crowd, and the way to do that is by having a point of view — being original. Don’t try to recreate what another band is doing. Write and play the music YOU love, the music YOU want to hear, and put yourself into the music. If you do this, and it’s honest, people will listen (especially if you have something to say).

Get on the radar of the right people aka “networking”

I hesitate to say “network” because it’s not about being a social climber who wants to “know the right people,” it’s about making genuine connections with people in the industry, and helping them even when it doesn’t seem like there’s something in it for you. Build real friendships and relationships with other bands, FANS, managers, promoters, venue staff, labels, etc… It will benefit your band in the long run.

Tour a lot, and give your music away for free!

There are exceptions to this, but for the most part, the coolest and tightest bands are the ones who tour the most and share their music with their fans for free! Give the music away, build an audience online, and then GO TOUR! Giving the music away allows you to reach fans without boundaries. If they like your music, the fans are going to support you when you come to town, AND they’re going to want to meet you – go meet your fans, build relationships with them and they’ll continue to support you.

Build the right team

Management, label, agents, etc — there is no formula for what “right” means. It’s different for every band, so you need to
figure that out for yourself — it’s about relationships and chemistry. Communicate what you need to the people you want to work with. If they’re the right team, they’ll be receptive and help you come up with actionable things you can do to reach your goals.

Put out a great first album (and be yourselves!)

With all the business talk, its easy to lose sight of what’s most important: your MUSIC. Push yourself and your band to make a great first impression by putting out music that truly represents and communicates who YOU are! BE YOURSELF and write what YOU want to HEAR!

Keep touring your ass off (on the RIGHT tours)

All tours are not created equal. Make sure you are getting on the right ones at the right time. For example, when Periphery was fortunate enough to tour with the Deftones, that really helped us out: we were introduced to a new fan base and it allowed us to be in front of large, receptive crowd each night. Again, that tour came to be because of a friendship and relationship between band members — be excellent to each other, and good things will happen.

Keep putting out great music

The sophomore slump is a real thing. A lot of bands get caught up in the mess of the industry and lose sight of MUSIC being most important, especially when you factor in your now-hectic touring schedule. Lots of bands start strong then fizzle. How many times have we heard “I only like the demo/first album”?” Don’t let that be your band. Focus on your music, your message, and again, BE YOURSELF!

Stay humble, hungry and motivated

Once you’ve “made it,” the work has just begun. Stay hungry.


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dcz702
post Apr 11 2014, 05:34 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Apr 11 2014, 12:52 AM) *
While it remains a huge challenge for everyone, it's a noble goal to shoot for. Of course, I"m talking about "Making a living making music". In this article, the drummer from PERIPHERY gives some truly sage advice smile.gif They came up from nothing and like the rest of us, used EZ drummer, reaper and even PODS to make their first recorded music.

Here is the link
http://www.decibelmagazine.com/featured/ho...h.7nq9oTB5.dpuf


Understand what you’re getting yourself into — AND FULLY COMMIT

This business is hard, and you need to be prepared to invest a lot of time and energy. Realistically, it’s going to take years of hard work for your band to make it, so exercise patience and just focus on being productive every day.

Find the right partners in crime

It all starts with having the right bandmates. Some bands consists of a bunch of best friends, others consist of the right players. For others, it’s a business relationship. If you don’t surround yourself with people who you get along with, can communicate with, and who are dedicated, then you’re screwed from the beginning. Find people who can play, have the same artistic vision, and who are willing to put in the work. Dont be afraid to change your lineup early on if someone isn’t working out — it’s better for the group to weed out the weak links.

Have a direction, and be yourself

With more bands than ever putting their music out, it’s easy for your music to get lost in the shuffle. Your music should stand out from the crowd, and the way to do that is by having a point of view — being original. Don’t try to recreate what another band is doing. Write and play the music YOU love, the music YOU want to hear, and put yourself into the music. If you do this, and it’s honest, people will listen (especially if you have something to say).

Get on the radar of the right people aka “networking”

I hesitate to say “network” because it’s not about being a social climber who wants to “know the right people,” it’s about making genuine connections with people in the industry, and helping them even when it doesn’t seem like there’s something in it for you. Build real friendships and relationships with other bands, FANS, managers, promoters, venue staff, labels, etc… It will benefit your band in the long run.

Tour a lot, and give your music away for free!

There are exceptions to this, but for the most part, the coolest and tightest bands are the ones who tour the most and share their music with their fans for free! Give the music away, build an audience online, and then GO TOUR! Giving the music away allows you to reach fans without boundaries. If they like your music, the fans are going to support you when you come to town, AND they’re going to want to meet you – go meet your fans, build relationships with them and they’ll continue to support you.

Build the right team

Management, label, agents, etc — there is no formula for what “right” means. It’s different for every band, so you need to
figure that out for yourself — it’s about relationships and chemistry. Communicate what you need to the people you want to work with. If they’re the right team, they’ll be receptive and help you come up with actionable things you can do to reach your goals.

Put out a great first album (and be yourselves!)

With all the business talk, its easy to lose sight of what’s most important: your MUSIC. Push yourself and your band to make a great first impression by putting out music that truly represents and communicates who YOU are! BE YOURSELF and write what YOU want to HEAR!

Keep touring your ass off (on the RIGHT tours)

All tours are not created equal. Make sure you are getting on the right ones at the right time. For example, when Periphery was fortunate enough to tour with the Deftones, that really helped us out: we were introduced to a new fan base and it allowed us to be in front of large, receptive crowd each night. Again, that tour came to be because of a friendship and relationship between band members — be excellent to each other, and good things will happen.

Keep putting out great music

The sophomore slump is a real thing. A lot of bands get caught up in the mess of the industry and lose sight of MUSIC being most important, especially when you factor in your now-hectic touring schedule. Lots of bands start strong then fizzle. How many times have we heard “I only like the demo/first album”?” Don’t let that be your band. Focus on your music, your message, and again, BE YOURSELF!

Stay humble, hungry and motivated

Once you’ve “made it,” the work has just begun. Stay hungry.

Great find Todd enjoyed reading it. Specially like people views on how to find the right members, the subject was short on that but the point on some people are friends some people are a match and some are business is stuff I like to read I'm still trying to find my match and I'm leaning more to people I'm able to hang out with and enjoy there company and drink beers while playing, a comfortable relaxed environment for fun and to progress. Myself I'm not looking to make a living from music although it would be nice.
I've put myself out there with link to things I recorded covers and my rec takes here, of course giving all credit to gmc and the instructors for those, and ended up getting quite a few replies. Most of those replies were replies like " hey we are interested in coming by we have a list of covers we want you to learn and we will begin playing shows ASAP"
Statement like that really turn me off. I want to jam and get into a comfort zone with my new found friends before making plans. Then shows would be great starting at small local venues to just go play not expecting to get paid and pay bills, just play. . Maybe I'm shy or looking at it the wrong way or feel I need to be better, sometimes I feel all 3. But really I feel friendship and being able to be yourself and relaxed is the only way I can hang. These thought I have have not slowed me down as far as learning and practice actually I've stepped it up quite a bit and have even more fun playing by myself as I ever did with my home set up. I have put music theory into my daily practice routine by using all outlets available to me, just waiting for the day people come along that fits what I feel is good for me. Maybe I've got it all wrong?
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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 11 2014, 08:32 AM
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I think that it's harder to get out there and do your thing, as long as a lot of venue owners are interested in cover bands because those attract the biggest crowds. Now, one surefooted way is to build a strong online presence and put out great vids and audio files with your compositions. In this way, you shoot two rabbits in one shot: you gain audience and fan base on a large scale not only locally and you get the attention of potential band members. Let's face it, who wouldn't want to be a part of a project that sounds great and is already having a fan base? smile.gif It's just a beginning theory but it is a place to start from.


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Todd Simpson
post Apr 11 2014, 10:26 AM
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Well said!!! Venue owners like cover bands quite a bit. It's a better draw in many cases. So finding places to play can be REALLY tough. So vids/youtube/soundcloud is more important than ever. If you can build any kind of following and then translate it live like TESSERACT did, BINGO!!!



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Apr 11 2014, 03:32 AM) *
I think that it's harder to get out there and do your thing, as long as a lot of venue owners are interested in cover bands because those attract the biggest crowds. Now, one surefooted way is to build a strong online presence and put out great vids and audio files with your compositions. In this way, you shoot two rabbits in one shot: you gain audience and fan base on a large scale not only locally and you get the attention of potential band members. Let's face it, who wouldn't want to be a part of a project that sounds great and is already having a fan base? smile.gif It's just a beginning theory but it is a place to start from.



YOU"VE GOT IT ALL RIGHT!!! smile.gif You gotta find a flow that works for you and it sounds like you have smile.gif

QUOTE (dcz702 @ Apr 11 2014, 12:34 AM) *
Great find Todd enjoyed reading it. Specially like people views on how to find the right members, the subject was short on that but the point on some people are friends some people are a match and some are business is stuff I like to read I'm still trying to fi..e fun playing by myself as I ever did with my home set up. I have put music theory into my daily practice routine by using all outlets available to me, just waiting for the day people come along that fits what I feel is good for me. Maybe I've got it all wrong?



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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 11 2014, 03:13 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Apr 11 2014, 04:32 AM) *
I think that it's harder to get out there and do your thing, as long as a lot of venue owners are interested in cover bands because those attract the biggest crowds. Now, one surefooted way is to build a strong online presence and put out great vids and audio files with your compositions. In this way, you shoot two rabbits in one shot: you gain audience and fan base on a large scale not only locally and you get the attention of potential band members. Let's face it, who wouldn't want to be a part of a project that sounds great and is already having a fan base? smile.gif It's just a beginning theory but it is a place to start from.


This is the advantage that modern technologies and social network has provided to everybody. I started my band in the older way, 10 years ago, but if I had to start something new today, I would go for this idea.

The article is a good guide with the important things that you must to have in mind when you decide to dedicate to music and try to make your band / musical project bigger. Thanks for sharing Todd!


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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 12 2014, 09:41 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Apr 11 2014, 02:13 PM) *
This is the advantage that modern technologies and social network has provided to everybody. I started my band in the older way, 10 years ago, but if I had to start something new today, I would go for this idea.

The article is a good guide with the important things that you must to have in mind when you decide to dedicate to music and try to make your band / musical project bigger. Thanks for sharing Todd!


Gabi - I think that you and I are that generation which is caught in the middle somehow - we started oldschool but along the way we have adapted to what the future brought smile.gif I am also thinking that the internet is an endless resource (for now) for promo and all in all gettin yourself seen smile.gif But I have a curiosity: What if Facebook wouldn't exist from tomorrow, what then?


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Todd Simpson
post Apr 15 2014, 12:11 AM
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What is the world didn't exist tomorrow, what then? smile.gif


More to the point, what if facebook still exists and bands have to find a way leverage it for the net few years? What then? That's probably a more relevant question. It's a changing lanscape and facebook won't be around forever, but when it goes away, something will pick up the slack and it's time to reinvent one's strategy smile.gif

Todd




QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Apr 12 2014, 04:41 PM) *
Gabi - I think that you and I are that generation which is caught in the middle somehow - we started oldschool but along the way we have adapted to what the future brought smile.gif I am also thinking that the internet is an endless resource (for now) for promo and all in all gettin yourself seen smile.gif But I have a curiosity: What if Facebook wouldn't exist from tomorrow, what then?



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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 15 2014, 07:05 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Apr 14 2014, 11:11 PM) *
What is the world didn't exist tomorrow, what then? smile.gif


More to the point, what if facebook still exists and bands have to find a way leverage it for the net few years? What then? That's probably a more relevant question. It's a changing lanscape and facebook won't be around forever, but when it goes away, something will pick up the slack and it's time to reinvent one's strategy smile.gif

Todd


The world was around for far longer than the internet I believe wink.gif But my question was asked so that people would come up with creative ideas for promoting their music and bands smile.gif Relying on ONE thing in life is not that good of an approach and usually when you stay too relaxed, you may find yourself facing a situation for which you don't have any plan B smile.gif


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klasaine
post Apr 15 2014, 07:18 AM
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It also depends on what you do in music and what you want to do.

I freelance and I like it. It's what I'm good at. Nobody cares if I'm present on FB. They like to meet me and talk to me in person. Sure, when I play gigs I post most of them on FB but before that I'd just call people and frankly, that got more folks out to hear me now that I think about it. I know personally I'm more apt to go to a gig if I get a call or a text a day or two before or even on the same day.

Facebook, Twitter and whatever the next one is, it doesn't matter. Use all that shit but you should still go out to gigs and hang out where musicians and fans hang out. Be on the scene.


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Todd Simpson
post Apr 16 2014, 06:17 AM
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Good point!! Always have a plan b smile.gif The web is just one thing. It's crucial to think of a broader world where interaction with actual people offline can really help propel a project forward.

There really is something to say about the importance of "pressing the flesh" as it were smile.gif Well said!


Todd



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Apr 15 2014, 02:05 AM) *
The world was around for far longer than the internet I believe wink.gif But my question was asked so that people would come up with creative ideas for promoting their music and bands smile.gif Relying on ONE thing in life is not that good of an approach and usually when you stay too relaxed, you may find yourself facing a situation for which you don't have any plan B smile.gif



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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 16 2014, 02:39 PM
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I think it should be a combo of both, where possible smile.gif I always like to mingle and get to have a drink with people - see how they are, how they react, when they can't hide behind a screen away from being seen and felt directly smile.gif

Also, building real live connections is far more beneficial at leas here in Romania - let's suppose that you want to present your band to a promoter, who could place you in the biggest festivals in the country. If you send him a presskit, chances are that REGARDLESS of how good you are, he will not even notice. IF you get introduced by a friend at a concert/party - real life event - he will notice and he will most likely DO something for you because HE TRUSTS the opinion of THAT friend who introduced you smile.gif That's how things work and that's what you need to have in mind as well. So as I said, it should be a harmonious co-existence of the two environments - online and offline wink.gif

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Apr 16 2014, 02:40 PM


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