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dcz702
post May 4 2014, 09:08 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ May 4 2014, 02:51 PM) *
Specifically what are the pedal brands and models and in what order (from guitar to amp) are they?

guitar>boss tu3 tuner>dunlop Custom audio electronic wah>MXR phase90>keeley compressor>fulltone OCD>ISP Decimator2>Front of amp
FX loop>boss chorus>MXR carbon copy delay>TC electronic Arena Reverb> return. and a boss RC3 loop station wich leave off of my board and put into the last pedal of the chain of the fx loop only when i need to use it for practice and want to come up with lead parts or practice scales and other things.

This post has been edited by dcz702: May 4 2014, 09:18 PM
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klasaine
post May 4 2014, 10:57 PM
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I would put the phaser after the OCD. Even the best phasers are a little noisy.

I like my ISP first in line but I generally use single coil pkups.


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dcz702
post May 5 2014, 04:19 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ May 4 2014, 09:57 PM) *
I would put the phaser after the OCD. Even the best phasers are a little noisy.

I like my ISP first in line but I generally use single coil pkups.

so you would suggest wah>ocd>phase 90>compressor? i like the way the compressor sounds after the phase90.
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klasaine
post May 5 2014, 04:57 AM
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I prefer Phasers post distortion.

As far as where you put your compressor ...
A comp limits/levels loud sounds and expands/amplifies quiet sounds. If the phase 90 is a little noisy (and they all are) then the comp post the phase and distortion may be amplifying that 'noise'. I'm not saying don't do it, just be aware that that may be contributing to the overall noise floor.

*I like comp pre-distortion. That a personal preference.
If you handed me your pedals I would order them Wah > comp > OCD > phase 90.

This post has been edited by klasaine: May 5 2014, 05:00 AM


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SeeJay
post May 5 2014, 06:10 PM
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Try picturing what you are doing by placing pedals in certain orders.
Phase ---> Distortion, you are phasing out your clean signal and distorting it.
Distortion ---> Phase, you are taking your distorted sound and phasing the whole tone.


Here's some good guidelines:

When organizing your pedals, you should first determine the purpose of each pedal. To help, here is a basic categorization of pedal types and their purposes:

Signal conditioners - Pedals that only alter the general sound by increasing gain and optionally changing the EQ. Includes preamp, overdrive, boost, distortion, fuzz and compressor pedals.

Filter effects - Pedals that adjust the frequency response by enhancing, notching out, or shaping the frequencies in certain ranges. Includes wah, envelope filter, and EQ pedals.

Volume/Level effects - Pedals that cause changes in the overall signal by increasing or decreasing level, or controlling certain peaks. Includes volume, tremolo, and noise gate pedals. A compressor could be considered in this category because of its volume control and ability to smooth peaks and valleys in a signal.

Modulation effects - Pedals that modulate the original sound by introducing several signals to interact with the others in order to produce frequencies otherwise not present. Includes chorus, flanger, phase shifting, and rotary simulating pedals. Vibrato could also be considered in this category.

Pitch related effects - Pedals that alter the pitch of the signal by adding octaves or bending the pitch. Includes octave and pitch shifting pedals such as a whammy. Vibrato could also be considered in this category.

Echo and time-based effects - Pedals that simulate the original introduction of the sound by copying and repeating the sound or through an echo effect. Includes delay, reverb, and echo pedals.

Now that the pedals are categorized, we’ll go over a very basic pedal layout, an arrangement that we have found to typically work best, guitar being the start of the signal path and the amp being the end.

Guitar --> Signal conditioners --> Filter effects -->

Pitch related effects --> Modulation effects --> Volume/Level effects -->

Echo and time-based effects --> Amp


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Todd Simpson
post May 5 2014, 06:14 PM
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Spot on here smile.gif Putting a comp post distortion sorta wastes the benefit of being able to control your dynamics before your first gain stage. I always put comps pre dist as well.

Bingo on the phase also, comping before noisy fx just makes everything more noisy.


One really limiting thing about pedals is that most of them let you use one setting only. That puts some serious limits on the options you can have for getting various tones/fx out of your rig. I use a pedal board for things to enhance my multi fx as they are stuck in whatever setting they are at where the multi changes settings on each pedal inside with each patch.

For example, I use my tube drive pedal to boost in input to my muli fx unit during solos. I use the envelope filter pedal on some patches as a sort of "super flanger" etc. But if I was stuck with just the pedals, I've got to say I'd feel really hemmed in. I use two delay units on some mult fx patches for the way they impact the tone, not as delay, for example. But if it was stuck in that position, I'd need to add two more delay pedals to stomp section to get around it.

But fx are up to preference so if it's working for you then more power to ya!


QUOTE (klasaine @ May 4 2014, 11:57 PM) *
I prefer Phasers post distortion.

As far as where you put your compressor ...
A comp limits/levels loud sounds and expands/amplifies quiet sounds. If the phase 90 is a little noisy (and they all are) then the comp post the phase and distortion may be amplifying that 'noise'. I'm not saying don't do it, just be aware that that may be contributing to the overall noise floor.

*I like comp pre-distortion. That a personal preference.
If you handed me your pedals I would order them Wah > comp > OCD > phase 90.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: May 5 2014, 06:23 PM


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