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> New Study Shows Guitarists Brains Are Different
Todd Simpson
post Apr 30 2014, 07:16 PM
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As you may have suspected, musicians and guitar players in specific have brains that are just different. In short, guitar players are bit more "intuitive" than most and able to tap the creative center of the brain during a jam solo smile.gif

best quote from the article.

"Playing Guitar isn't a skill, it's a way of being."



http://www.policymic.com/articles/88357/sc...everybody-elses

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Apr 30 2014, 07:18 PM


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Mertay
post Apr 30 2014, 08:32 PM
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Yeah I saw that today and believe it smile.gif


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Jeroen
post Apr 30 2014, 08:39 PM
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Very interesting article. I always knew that I'm different, but after reading this it's confirmed smile.gif


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bleez
post Apr 30 2014, 10:04 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Apr 30 2014, 07:16 PM) *
best quote from the article.

"Playing Guitar isn't a skill, it's a way of being."

that's an awesome quote. Im totally stealing that cool.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 30 2014, 10:25 PM
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Very nice! Thanks for sharing Todd. I will save this one for reading it later.


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Spock
post Apr 30 2014, 11:55 PM
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This goes back to my position that guitar comes much easier to some than others. Sure, it can be learned and executed, but then there are some that the positioning and synchronization come naturally too - and it's usually those that are more emotional in their playing and less mechanical.
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jstcrsn
post Apr 30 2014, 11:59 PM
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QUOTE (Spock @ Apr 30 2014, 11:55 PM) *
This goes back to my position that guitar comes much easier to some than others. Sure, it can be learned and executed, but then there are some that the positioning and synchronization come naturally too - and it's usually those that are more emotional in their playing and less mechanical.

great , now you got us back to practice vs. gifted
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waynedcoville
post May 1 2014, 12:31 AM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Apr 30 2014, 10:59 PM) *
great , now you got us back to practice vs. gifted


thats true. i admittedly only scanned the article, so i'm wondering if it mentioned studying the brains of guitarists that practice for hours everyday and pit them against the brains of those guitarists that seem to have already known everything from birth.


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Spock
post May 1 2014, 12:37 AM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Apr 30 2014, 06:59 PM) *
great , now you got us back to practice vs. gifted



biggrin.gif

Well it's both. But just like with anything else, what do you stick with mostly? What gives the quickest payout. Sheer determination can take anyone as far as they wish, but if that determination is being rewarded by an innate ability and success comes in much smaller increments, then the likelihood of sticking to something and even devoting more time to it is bound to be there. Who wouldn't want to be a good guitar player? Anyone that picks up a guitar, and even people that have not - but just dream that they wish they could. Sure anyone can learn to play, but the difference is in the natural ability and the Return on Investment (ROI).
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klasaine
post May 1 2014, 12:49 AM
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It's been documented pretty heavily now that 'musicians' brains do develop differently and generally better, cognitively.

*Operative word - develop.

It's also been shown that the musicians' brains that are slightly different in certain regions are those musicians, that at least to a certain degree, excel at being musicians. In other words, just learning a few things and getting through lets say piano book one and two ain't gonna get it. You need to at least work relatively hard at it for a few years and acquire a certain degree of skill w/in the discipline.

Neurologist Oliver Sacks is one of (if not the) foremost authorities on this stuff.

As for natural talent v. hard work ... I believe those that are talented's talent lies in their ability to 1) focus really well and 2) love to do the work and put in the time. Their 'talent' is their drive and their desire.

This post has been edited by klasaine: May 1 2014, 12:53 AM


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casinostrat
post May 1 2014, 02:48 AM
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As for natural talent v. hard work ... I believe those that are talented's talent lies in their ability to 1) focus really well and 2) love to do the work and put in the time. Their 'talent' is their drive and their desire.


I totally agree!


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Todd Simpson
post May 1 2014, 04:03 AM
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Me too!!! smile.gif Killer quote.

QUOTE (bleez @ Apr 30 2014, 05:04 PM) *
that's an awesome quote. Im totally stealing that cool.gif



hahahaha, your welcome smile.gif
QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Apr 30 2014, 06:59 PM) *
great , now you got us back to practice vs. gifted



Sadly no. But the real thrust of the article is that being a guitar player is a way of being, more than anything else. Being intuitive, flexible, and creative. smile.gif

QUOTE (waynedcoville @ Apr 30 2014, 07:31 PM) *
thats true. i admittedly only scanned the article, so i'm wondering if it mentioned studying the brains of guitarists that practice for hours everyday and pit them against the brains of those guitarists that seem to have already known everything from birth.



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Spock
post May 1 2014, 10:27 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Apr 30 2014, 07:49 PM) *
As for natural talent v. hard work ... I believe those that are talented's talent lies in their ability to 1) focus really well and 2) love to do the work and put in the time. Their 'talent' is their drive and their desire.



Some people are just wired to be able to play guitar and get more return on investment, the talent can be innately mental, physical a mixture of both - for whatever reason, so people develop the skills it takes much quicker than others. The playing field is not even - never has been, never will be. In order to be successful in whatever we do, we need to focus on our abilities and develop our natural talents, which come quicker with quicker payout than developing a talent that you may not be naturally inclined to do.

Even Steve Vai said this in one of his clinics, which I believe was posted on this forum somewhere, that he didn't concentrate much on the things he had difficulty with, he preferred to excel in the things that came naturally to him.

Sort of like this inspirational piece about this guy who is 5'5" and taught himself to dunk. Now, if he were 6'5" not only would he be naturally able to dunk, he could also easily develop a finesse about his style of dunking, but because he is short, he had to insanely concentrate on what it would take for him just to get the ball into a hoop which is 10' off the ground.

You can't take anything away from his achievement because he doesn't have the finesse or polished moves of a 6'5" basketball player - but the fact that he is able to do it alone seems an impossible feat.



This post has been edited by Spock: May 1 2014, 10:30 AM
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Todd Simpson
post May 1 2014, 06:02 PM
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I always love this debate smile.gif the good news is, even though some folks do have a "leg up" due to simple genetics/neural construction/etc., I firmly believe that ANYONE can become a "GREAT" Player if they are willing to earn it. Sure, some folks will make more gains quicker, that's true in any endeavor with any group of folks.

But the great thing about guitar and really anything else, is that simple, dogged, defiant, determination is the best weapon and best "Advantage" one could have IMHO smile.gif

For example, I have some pretty serious dyslexia and have serious and documented limitations with fine motor/muscle control. I had a very hard time learning to write using a pen/pencil for example and my writing is still horrible. I was told I would "NEVER" play guitar or any instrument requiring fine control, and to pick a different hobby at a very young age.

Needless to say, I insisted (upon being tested/diagnosed by several "experts" at a very young age) that, not only would I learn to play, I would become so good that folks would ask me to show them how. And whaddya know...........

Todd



QUOTE (Spock @ May 1 2014, 05:27 AM) *
Some people are just wired to be able to play guitar and get more return on investment, the talent can be innately mental, physical a mixture of both - for whatever reason, so people develop the skills it takes much quicker than others. The playing field is not even - never has been, never will be. In order to be successful in whatever we do, we need to focus on our abilities and develop our natural talents, which come quicker with quicker payout than developing a talent that you may not be naturally inclined to do.

Even Steve Vai said this in one of his clinics, which I believe was posted on this forum somewhere, that he didn't concentrate much on the things he had difficulty with, he preferred to excel in the things that came naturally to him.

Sort of like this inspirational piece about this guy who is 5'5" and taught himself to dunk. Now, if he were 6'5" not only would he be naturally able to dunk, he could also easily develop a finesse about his style of dunking, but because he is short, he had to insanely concentrate on what it would take for him just to get the ball into a hoop which is 10' off the ground.

You can't take anything away from his achievement because he doesn't have the finesse or polished moves of a 6'5" basketball player - but the fact that he is able to do it alone seems an impossible feat.




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