Reply to this topicStart new topic
> The Line Between Beginner And Intermediate
Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 2 2014, 02:55 PM
Post #1


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



When are you no longer a beginner? Where should we draw the line? smile.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Jun 3 2014, 01:00 AM
Post #2


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 28.826
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



This is a great question! Nowadays I see this clearer thanks to GMC lessons levels. From my opinion I could say that you should be able to play lessons over level 3 to be an intermediate player. This means that you already have a sense of rhythm, can change chords smooth and can play some melodies and simple solos on guitar. What do you think?


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Monica Gheorghev...
post Jun 3 2014, 06:43 AM
Post #3


Learning Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.399
Joined: 12-July 13
From: Bucharest, Romania
Member No.: 18.479




This is a hard question. I will say what I saw in my case wink.gif

Let's say that now I choose to learn a lesson from blues style which is level 3. After I passed the lesson I am able to make a step further and make a blues lesson from level 4 and after that from the level 5, etc.
But if I want to make a metal lesson even if I finished (as example), a blues lesson from level 5, for metal I must learn from the beginning, from the level 2-3. This happen because each style comes with specific techniques.

To respond at your question, I think when you are able to play any beginner lesson (level 3-4) for every style, then you can say that you are at an intermediate level. You must put basic knowledge for each technique to go further.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mertay
post Jun 3 2014, 07:16 AM
Post #4


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 2.726
Joined: 27-May 13
From: Turkey / izmir
Member No.: 18.294



Mine is a bit personal I guess but instead of beginner, I usually say songwriter level.

Its standard is a bit higher than beginner, being able to play any chord based song when searched on internet (!) and identify if its correct. This includes good chord and rhythm pattern knowledge so he/she can play along with the track. This also helps naturally learn musical form with practice. While progressing, works on loads of non-melodic exercises.

On intermediate level, comes powerchord stuff etc. basically he/she starts to become the ideal rhythm guitar player for a band. This develops fast so solo playing also begins here...


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Jun 3 2014, 07:34 AM
Post #5


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



QUOTE (Monica Gheorghevici @ Jun 3 2014, 01:43 PM) *
This is a hard question. I will say what I saw in my case wink.gif

Let's say that now I choose to learn a lesson from blues style which is level 3. After I passed the lesson I am able to make a step further and make a blues lesson from level 4 and after that from the level 5, etc.
But if I want to make a metal lesson even if I finished (as example), a blues lesson from level 5, for metal I must learn from the beginning, from the level 2-3. This happen because each style comes with specific techniques.

To respond at your question, I think when you are able to play any beginner lesson (level 3-4) for every style, then you can say that you are at an intermediate level. You must put basic knowledge for each technique to go further.


I'd totally agree with this. I know when it comes to rhythem and power chords I'm solid but when it comes to chords I'm still like a beginner. Its the fact I never really needed it with what I was playing.

Always been a grey area I think. But I have to agree being able to do any lesson 3 or above.

On the same not when does a intermediate player become advanced?


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PosterBoy
post Jun 3 2014, 08:12 AM
Post #6


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.447
Joined: 26-October 11
From: Galway, Ireland
Member No.: 14.225



I think like people are showing above there are many categories in being a guitarist and musician that you would have to grade, rather than just an overall grade.

I can appear to be a pretty good musician in many situations, and a beginner in others.


--------------------
Currently Working on

PosterBoy's Modern Riffing with Gabriel

PosterBoy's Bootcamp with Todd



Gear
Tyler Burning Water 2K
Burny RLG90 with BK Emeralds
Fender US Tele with BK Piledrivers
Axe Fx Ultra - GCP Pro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 3 2014, 09:31 AM
Post #7


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



I think that you are no longer a beginner, when you start realizing your mistakes from a technical perspective and you are able to know what you should work on and when it sounds as it should smile.gif

It's that moment when you realize that you've been doing something in a way that was less productive at one point and suddenly BANG - that's how it's done.

I think that Posterboy hit a good spot there - you can be a beginner all your life in some moments smile.gif The true thing is how, fast you can learn with the aid of your experience? A good read on these aspects, is in the Zen Guitar, by Philip Toshio Sudo - see the concept of the black belt gone white again.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd May 2017 - 02:19 AM