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> Making A Future In The Music "biz"!
Todd Simpson
post Jul 4 2014, 11:02 PM
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*Also posted in my promotion thread for permanent reference
DOWNLOADED MUSIC FALLS TO ALL TIME LOW


In case you needed any proof that that STREAMING IS THE FUTURE of the Music Business as a "Business", ........
Attached Image

Those unable to adapt in any system, are the first ones to lose out. So ADAPT! smile.gif Get your music on as many streaming services as humanly possible. Don't do it for the money. THERE"S NONE TO BE HAD! smile.gif Do it for the same reason you keep a youtube channel. It's one more step in getting people to know who you are and what your music is all about!!

At this point, you main stumbling block is ANONYMITY!! E.G. Nobody knows or cares who you are or what your music is about. So that's the thing to fix first! smile.gif Once you crack the shell and get some recognition, then you are on your way to having something that is financially viable and that you can sell/rent/etc. smile.gif Your Music!! smile.gif


Todd

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jul 6 2014, 12:23 AM


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klasaine
post Jul 5 2014, 07:47 AM
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Everybody talks about all the various ways you can't make money in music anymore. Very negative IMO.
How about some of the ways you can ... ?

Lets suppose that maybe somebody does in fact want to make money 'with guitar in hand'.
Who's successfully made some dough playing music *currently* and how did you do it?

Just a thought.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 5 2014, 07:48 AM


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 6 2014, 12:21 AM
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The purpose of this post is to point out a trend in order to help folks focus their future efforts smile.gif Not trying to be "negative". I always try to see the most positive aspect of any situation where possible.

I did point out, that one should try to get on as many streaming services as possible. The graphic here simply showing that downloads are going away, thus why I'm encouraging the refocus.

The point in getting on streaming services as I"ve mentioned many times in the past, is to try to get over the "Anonymity Barrier". It's after that point that you can actually start to make money as you have a valid product wink.gif I didn't go in to that again here though, but I will add it as an addendum to all future posts in this thread if it would help smile.gif

"MAKING MONEY"
As a pro yourself, I'd ask why you didn't respond with how you are currently making money with the guitar? Please do take a moment and share with us smile.gif

Todd



QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 5 2014, 02:47 AM) *
Everybody talks about all the various ways you can't make money in music anymore. Very negative IMO.
How about some of the ways you can ... ?

Lets suppose that maybe somebody does in fact want to make money 'with guitar in hand'.
Who's successfully made some dough playing music *currently* and how did you do it?

Just a thought.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jul 6 2014, 12:22 AM


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klasaine
post Jul 6 2014, 02:07 AM
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I've said it many times.
The old fashioned way ...

I studied really hard and I built and still continue to build a personal, face to face (or player to player) network.
Yes, the internet helps but mostly I get gigs by going to gigs and hanging out and from playing good on the gigs I get.

*As far as being prepared when you actually get a chance to maybe getting paid ...
Work on more than one style, be able to at least read a chord chart, ear training, play in tune, don't complain, don't be late, generally keep your mouth shut and be positive.


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 6 2014, 02:42 AM
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Well there it is folks!! smile.gif Hard won advice and timeless no matter what the technology may bring.

1.)Study/Work Hard (Fortune favors the prepared mind)
2.)Network (Who you know is at least, if not more valuable than "what" you know)
3.)Being Professional (When you get a gig, NAIL IT, don't be late, don't complain)

Now were talking!! smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 5 2014, 09:07 PM) *
I've said it many times.
The old fashioned way ...

I studied really hard and I built and still continue to build a personal, face to face (or player to player) network.
Yes, the internet helps but mostly I get gigs by going to gigs and hanging out and from playing good on the gigs I get.

*As far as being prepared when you actually get a chance to maybe getting paid ...
Work on more than one style, be able to at least read a chord chart, ear training, play in tune, don't complain, don't be late, generally keep your mouth shut and be positive.


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klasaine
post Jul 6 2014, 04:08 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jul 5 2014, 06:42 PM) *
1.)Study/Work Hard (Fortune favors the prepared mind)
2.)Network (Who you know is at least, if not more valuable than "what" you know)


The definition of LUCK is preparation meeting opportunity.

('if' you want to be a professional) Who you know IS as important as what you know.
This is not the art side or the talent side or the fair side of music. It's the business side.
Which I realize can totally and understandably ruin it for many.

*My luck has been helped along due to the fact that I live in an 'industry' town.
In the old days (pre 1993) the established players/performers would advise young, potentially up and coming guys and gals to "move to a music town ... that's where you'll meet the musicians" - you can move back to the country when you're established.
As I said before, the internet (youtube, etc.) can assist with that now but musicians like to hang out - eat dinner, go to parties, have a beer, go to see another band together or meet up at the club. The real face to face still matters most.
This isn't just an older guy (me) talking. I work with musicians 1/2 my age fairly regularly and they like to hang out too - usually more than me.
I've noticed that he or she whom is closest in their memory tends to get the call.
I can't tell you how many times I'm at a bar or a party and I run into a player I haven't seen (worked with) in two years and after 20 minutes of catching up they ask, "hey, what are you doing such and such date? I need a guitar player for it".
In sight - in mind.
Again, youtube helps but it can be a sea of overwhelming and the environment that you experience youtube in is prone to distraction. In fact for most, youtube IS a distraction.

As with anything else there are of course exceptions.
In the last 24 years of doing solely music for work, I can can count on less than one hand the 'exceptions' I've met personally.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 6 2014, 04:25 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 6 2014, 06:42 PM
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Thanks for yet another very spiff post on the subject! This is some stuff indeed. The networking aspect of things really can't be overstated. It's really that important to actually "press the flesh" especially when starting out and seeking new opportunity. Being the first name that comes to mind when someone needs a player/writer/mixer/etc. is a big part of getting "the call". So meet folks smile.gif Online and offline. Go to shows, go to gatherings, pass out biz cards (vistaprint.com will give you some for free) and get in front of people smile.gif


QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 6 2014, 11:08 AM) *
The definition of LUCK is preparation meeting opportunity.

('if' you want to be a professional) Who you know IS as important as what you know.
This is not the art side or the talent side or the fair side of music. It's the business side.
Which I realize can totally and understandably ruin it for many.

*My luck has been helped along due to the fact that I live in an 'industry' town.
In the old days (pre 1993) the established players/performers would advise young, potentially up and coming guys and gals to "move to a music town ... that's where you'll meet the musicians" - you can move back to the country when you're established.
As I said before, the internet (youtube, etc.) can assist with that now but musicians like to hang out - eat dinner, go to parties, have a beer, go to see another band together or meet up at the club. The real face to face still matters most.
This isn't just an older guy (me) talking. I work with musicians 1/2 my age fairly regularly and they like to hang out too - usually more than me.
I've noticed that he or she whom is closest in their memory tends to get the call.
I can't tell you how many times I'm at a bar or a party and I run into a player I haven't seen (worked with) in two years and after 20 minutes of catching up they ask, "hey, what are you doing such and such date? I need a guitar player for it".
In sight - in mind.
Again, youtube helps but it can be a sea of overwhelming and the environment that you experience youtube in is prone to distraction. In fact for most, youtube IS a distraction.

As with anything else there are of course exceptions.
In the last 24 years of doing solely music for work, I can can count on less than one hand the 'exceptions' I've met personally.


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Arpeggio
post Jul 6 2014, 10:33 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 5 2014, 07:47 AM) *
Everybody talks about all the various ways you can't make money in music anymore. Very negative IMO.
How about some of the ways you can ... ?


Before we know it, musician might one of the few jobs left.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/column...y-work/6707457/

Here are some relevant quotes (although the whole article is interesting)…

“The career fields seen losing the most jobs include not just relatively low-skilled occupations such as telemarketing and retail sales, but also high-paying positions now held by accountants, auditors, budget analysts, technical writers and insurance adjusters, among others.”

“The jobs that will persist in the future include those that either take advantage of uniquely-human traits – such as manual dexterity, creativity and emotional intelligence – or that improve the lives of other humans directly in a face-to-face setting.”

Interesting tangent:

“For similar reasons, firefighters have a much lower chance of being replaced by software than pilots, even though the latter have arguably more technical skills.”

The plane is an external extension/enhancement over human ability to begin with, whereas a fireman generally isn’t.

Last bit says:

“In the next column in the series, I'll report on how the pace of technology's impact on the employment market is accelerating.”

John Nash said similar about the accelerating rate of technological progress. It's happening.

There was a saying in the 50’s that in the future nobody would have to work, far fetched I know. In ways this is starting to take place now, the following case in point…

http://inhabitat.com/german-village-produc...-than-it-needs/

More people are growing their own food now too.

http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/201...od_finally.html

My underlying angle on that is economic independence.


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klasaine
post Jul 7 2014, 03:50 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jul 6 2014, 10:42 AM) *
The networking aspect of things really can't be overstated. It's really that important to actually "press the flesh" especially when starting out and seeking new opportunity. Being the first name that comes to mind when someone needs a player/writer/mixer/etc. is a big part of getting "the call". So meet folks smile.gif


Long story short ...

Wednesday night I get a call to sub a four week, summer music camp/workshop where pro players coach, clinic and 'shadow' kids in various types of bands (rock, jazz, R&B, musical theater, whatever). I'm just teaching/coaching one class two days a week (substituting for a regular who cut up his left hand).

I was contacted by someone I don't know (the program director for this summer music camp).
So, when I get to the preliminary meeting this morning - who do I see?
Four guys that I play in a band with fairly regularly.

Who do think recommended me?


*Also, there's a couple of other guys teaching there that I've always wanted to meet and jam with, so ...
The networking thing. It never ends.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 7 2014, 09:31 AM


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