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> Combine Picking & Legato For Speed, Anyone can do it !
Ben Higgins
post Jul 12 2014, 09:33 AM
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Combining Picking and Legato

Let's look at the use of legato and picking in a sextuplet run. In my latest lesson at 0:26 I play an ascending run that uses a 6 note scalar sequence before shifting position to the next shape. Instead of picking every note we pick the first note to start it off then play the next 2 notes on that string using hammer-ons. That's the first 3 notes sorted. Then we move to the next string where we pick the last 3 notes. If you're not used to doing this then it may seem weird at first but once you learn the pattern it feels very comfortable and picking the last 3 notes instead of the first 3 has a nice natural momentum to it.

Paul Gilbert is very known for combining picking and legato in this way but an even earlier example is Eddie Van Halen himself. Here he is using this approach on a live solo. Check it out from 0:48.



Using Paul Gilbert as an example I also covered this technique in one of my YT videos as well.

Using this combination of techniques in a typical ascending or descending scalar run is probably the easiest way to introduce yourself to this approach. Once you're comfortable combing picking and legato in this way, you can start to experiment with other ways in which you can substitute picked notes for non picked notes.

What are the benefits of doing this at all ? Well, tonally it gives a different sound to full alternate picking. So it can give contrast. Some people may even prefer the sound of picking / legato combined as opposed to all picking.

Secondly, if you're not a massive picking guy or girl, then it offers you a way in which you can still blaze up and down the neck at top speeds. You don't need to always pick everything. Guitar playing is about music and music isn't always played one way or nothing.

So, give it a go ! Maybe share some examples of yourself playing the lick from my latest lesson !


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 13 2014, 02:10 PM
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Anybody tried this yet ? I thought there would be at least some replies seeing how this forum is usually obsessed with alternate picking and such like ! smile.gif

Don't be shy !


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Arpeggio
post Jul 13 2014, 06:34 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 12 2014, 09:33 AM) *
Combining Picking and Legato

Secondly, if you're not a massive picking guy or girl, then it offers you a way in which you can still blaze up and down the neck at top speeds. You don't need to always pick everything. Guitar playing is about music and music isn't always played one way or nothing.


I have noticed how on an exercise or scale at a higher speed I can only last so long until I start to slip behind the metronome to realize that I’m almost as a fast but not quite as fast, which isn’t noticeable until after 2 - 3 repeats. I guess it could be a bit like if you had one car doing 10mph and another doing 10.1 mph you wouldn’t notice after a few metres, but after going a mile one car would be noticeably ahead of the other.

Eventually I’d like to be good enough for it to be stylistic choice only and be able to pick the lot! usually I think I’d deal with that kind of thing with legato only, but combining techniques makes sense.


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 13 2014, 06:54 PM
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Well said smile.gif The choice of legato or picking will eventually be an artistic choice, not dictated by your hands endurance. To Wit, I'd suggest attending today's Video Chat where I'll share some of my Favorite endurance workouts as well as tips/tricks to allow your hand to play on!

Todd

QUOTE (Arpeggio @ Jul 13 2014, 01:34 PM) *
I have noticed how on an exercise or scale at a higher speed I can only last so long until I start to slip behind the metronome to realize that I’m almost as a fast but not quite as fast, which isn’t noticeable until after 2 - 3 repeats. I guess it could be a bit like if you had one car doing 10mph and another doing 10.1 mph you wouldn’t notice after a few metres, but after going a mile one car would be noticeably ahead of the other.

Eventually I’d like to be good enough for it to be stylistic choice only and be able to pick the lot! usually I think I’d deal with that kind of thing with legato only, but combining techniques makes sense.


Another fine post from the Benster!! Combining these two techniques is a great way to get more mileage out of ones fingers. It can preven over taxing and allow for finer tonal choice and varation as well.


QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 12 2014, 04:33 AM) *
Combining Picking and Legato

Let's look at the use of legato and picking in a sextuplet run. In my latest lesson at 0:26 I play an ascending run that uses a 6 note scalar sequence before shifting position to the next shape. Instead of picking every note we pick the first note to start it off then play the next 2 notes on that string using hammer-ons. That's the first 3 notes sorted. Then we move to the next string where we pick the last 3 notes. If you're not used to doing this then it may seem weird at first but once you learn the pattern it feels very comfortable and picking the last 3 notes instead of the first 3 has a nice natural momentum to it.

Paul Gilbert is very known for combining picking and legato in this way but an even earlier example is Eddie Van Halen himself. Here he is using this approach on a live solo. Check it out from 0:48.



Using Paul Gilbert as an example I also covered this technique in one of my YT videos as well.

Using this combination of techniques in a typical ascending or descending scalar run is probably the easiest way to introduce yourself to this approach. Once you're comfortable combing picking and legato in this way, you can start to experiment with other ways in which you can substitute picked notes for non picked notes.

What are the benefits of doing this at all ? Well, tonally it gives a different sound to full alternate picking. So it can give contrast. Some people may even prefer the sound of picking / legato combined as opposed to all picking.

Secondly, if you're not a massive picking guy or girl, then it offers you a way in which you can still blaze up and down the neck at top speeds. You don't need to always pick everything. Guitar playing is about music and music isn't always played one way or nothing.

So, give it a go ! Maybe share some examples of yourself playing the lick from my latest lesson !


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 13 2014, 07:14 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jul 13 2014, 06:54 PM) *
Well said smile.gif The choice of legato or picking will eventually be an artistic choice, not dictated by your hands endurance.


Yes eventually you can choose to use some legato / some picking because you like the sound of it (if you do). Full picking sequences do sound great but sometimes it's nice to break it up for the listener.


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AK Rich
post Jul 13 2014, 08:06 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 12 2014, 12:33 AM) *
Combining Picking and Legato

Let's look at the use of legato and picking in a sextuplet run. In my latest lesson at 0:26 I play an ascending run that uses a 6 note scalar sequence before shifting position to the next shape. Instead of picking every note we pick the first note to start it off then play the next 2 notes on that string using hammer-ons. That's the first 3 notes sorted. Then we move to the next string where we pick the last 3 notes. If you're not used to doing this then it may seem weird at first but once you learn the pattern it feels very comfortable and picking the last 3 notes instead of the first 3 has a nice natural momentum to it.

Paul Gilbert is very known for combining picking and legato in this way but an even earlier example is Eddie Van Halen himself. Here he is using this approach on a live solo. Check it out from 0:48.



Using Paul Gilbert as an example I also covered this technique in one of my YT videos as well.

Using this combination of techniques in a typical ascending or descending scalar run is probably the easiest way to introduce yourself to this approach. Once you're comfortable combing picking and legato in this way, you can start to experiment with other ways in which you can substitute picked notes for non picked notes.

What are the benefits of doing this at all ? Well, tonally it gives a different sound to full alternate picking. So it can give contrast. Some people may even prefer the sound of picking / legato combined as opposed to all picking.

Secondly, if you're not a massive picking guy or girl, then it offers you a way in which you can still blaze up and down the neck at top speeds. You don't need to always pick everything. Guitar playing is about music and music isn't always played one way or nothing.

So, give it a go ! Maybe share some examples of yourself playing the lick from my latest lesson !

Great picking/legato sequence Ben! That solo Eddie is playing sounds like a Spanish Fly variation, one of my alltime favorite guitar solo's!
Catch the example again here in the section between the 18 and 24 seconds for those that may not have heard it on the album. smile.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 13 2014, 08:56 PM
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QUOTE (AK Rich @ Jul 13 2014, 08:06 PM) *
Great picking/legato sequence Ben! That solo Eddie is playing sounds like a Spanish Fly variation, one of my alltime favorite guitar solo's!
Catch the example again here in the section between the 18 and 24 seconds for those that may not have heard it on the album. smile.gif



Yes I also thought he had taken it from Spanish Fly.. it's been years since I heard the original version. Very effective isn't it ?


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AK Rich
post Jul 14 2014, 05:36 AM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 13 2014, 11:56 AM) *
Yes I also thought he had taken it from Spanish Fly.. it's been years since I heard the original version. Very effective isn't it ?

Absolutely! Works great for moving up or down the fretboard as a bridge between different positions as you show in that slick little "Rhoads meets EVH" lesson that you posted where you linked the 2 tapping licks. smile.gif Nice job!
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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 14 2014, 07:21 AM
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I think that for me it was a matter of accents - I see the legato as a road and the picking as crossroads smile.gif I pick a bit and take a turn and then the legato just follows that road until the next crossroad. A metaphorical way of looking at things, but I think it depicts the idea pretty well and it can go very well with combining sweeping with alternate picking - you sweep a particular shape, let's say and when you reach the turning point (you are ascending and you want to finish the shape and descend again) you will alternate pick the notes found on the same string. That gives a bit of percussion to the fluidity of the sweep smile.gif That's how I like to use it anyway and I hope I gave you guys some ideas!


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