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> Had To Share.... 6.9 Billion
Todd Simpson
post Jul 22 2014, 07:59 AM
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It's official. The Music Industry generated 6.9 Billion Dollars in 2013 which is the lowest level since the RIAA started keeping score around 1973. The purpose of this post and several others I've made isn't to try to gloom up the place, or make things seem bloody awful, just to show that the "biz" has been through a wrenching and permanent change and that change isn't over. In fact, it's accelerating smile.gif First, to the infographic!

Attached Image

NOW THEN!!! TAKE HEART!!!

Time for one of my fave quotes smile.gif

"Change is an opportunity, not a threat.’


The really great opportunities come from great change. So rejoice! We live in a time of CONSTANT change, UPHEAVAL even! So embrace the changes around you. In the Music Biz, in technology, etc. Ride the wave and make these changes part of your success story, not part of your excuses list. Burn that list!

Todd


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wollace03
post Jul 22 2014, 08:06 AM
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When I attended an international business congress (2009) that dealt with the impact the rising unemployment rate because of the economical crisis will have on speaker said something, that is from then on one of my most used quotes:

"Never waste a good crisis"

a very strong message when things go in a direction you do not like to keep your head together and start to build a new empire....


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Carmine Marotta
post Jul 22 2014, 01:09 PM
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"Music itself is going to become like running water or electricity, just take advantage of these last few years because none of this is ever going to happen again. You'd better be prepared for doing a lot of touring because that's really the only unique situation that's going to be left. It's terribly exciting. But on the other hand it doesn't matter if you think it's exciting or not; it's what's going to happen.''

David Bowie, June 2002
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Mertay
post Jul 22 2014, 03:08 PM
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eh to be honest I'm not very positive about it, I mean I totally agree with Todd but would describe situation more of a "search" rather than "Change".

Notice this doesn't reflect gigs/shows or side profits (like movie soundtracks but not sold separatly, like whats paid to the composer by movie company etc.).

Personally for today I see music as an advertising tool (for gigs etc.) rather than a product (like cd is a product no matter what music is in it).

In short, I always advise to jam and compose to guitar players. No matter how things change, creativity will always have a part in it.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jul 22 2014, 03:10 PM
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Hey guys, there are really wise words and quote here. I can confirm Bowie's words (awesome to know that he said it 12 years ago!) with my band's experience. We record albums, we edit them, we have them on Spotify, Itunes, we monetized youtube, and we did everything else recommend to get some extra cash for the band, but on the long term, these services are mostly used as promotion to have more assistance to our shows which are the ones that generate the real money that we get to live and to re-investment.

By the way, I still insist that these changes and crisis are a great opportunity for new and indie bands compared to the 80's and 90's. Nowadays you just need a small investment but a lot of creativity to use all these new tools to promote your music. Music Industry is now anarchist, there are not rules that work for everything, everything is possible, the stronger and the most creative will survive. biggrin.gif


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jstcrsn
post Jul 22 2014, 07:13 PM
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QUOTE (wollace03 @ Jul 22 2014, 08:06 AM) *
When I attended an international business congress (2009) that dealt with the impact the rising unemployment rate because of the economical crisis will have on speaker said something, that is from then on one of my most used quotes:

"Never waste a good crisis"

a very strong message when things go in a direction you do not like to keep your head together and start to build a new empire....

This is what the mayor of Chicago is known for saying,But when a politician says it, it comes across more as an opportunity to score political points than actually fix things
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klasaine
post Jul 22 2014, 07:35 PM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Jul 22 2014, 11:13 AM) *
This is what the mayor of Chicago is known for saying,But when a politician says it, it comes across more as an opportunity to score political points than actually fix things


I know we don't always agree but a big +1 on that.


'Indie' has always been a very viable option ... since the birth of recording (sound and film). Same with promotion and management.
Motown, Atlantic, Blue Note, A&M, SST, Casablanca, Def Jam and a host of others ALL started in someone's garage/house or tiny rental space with an old recording machine, a couple of mics, a lot of creativity, a lot of drive and some decent business sense. Golden Voice and Cornerstone (concert promo cos.) started as indie companies. Even Ticket Master and Live Nation started small. Generally speaking, all the overfed behemoths of the entertainment industry - every arm of it - started the same way. An idea, a plan and a lot of hard work. And very little initial investment.
*The film company United Artists, 'UA' - started as an independent film co. set up by actors, directors, writers, cameramen, etc. It was founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks with the intention of controlling their own interests rather than depending upon the powerful commercial studios. Sound familiar?

Most bands in 'the good ole days' (which I don't even know when that really was?) never made enough money from record sales to live on - they had to gig.
Of albums released during the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and into the early 90s, probably 1 in 200 turned enough of a profit to pay the band. If you didn't (don't) go platinum at least twice in a row you didn't really make enough money from record sales to live on for more than a couple of years. And only then if you were still gigging/touring.

Read a R&R biography. Pick one - any one.

Play gigs. Write songs (song is king!). Keep your publishing. License your music. Learn to play more than one thing.
There are no more bands/artists now that people care about or follow or whatever than there ever was.

The delivery options always change.
How you get to where someone actually wants to take delivery of your product has never changed.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 23 2014, 03:22 PM


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jstcrsn
post Jul 22 2014, 10:27 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 22 2014, 07:35 PM) *
I know we don't always agree but a big +1 on that.

I like you more than you think ,as far apart as our views are.You don't hide behind a facade ,you are real and honest .I have many friends with your views and it is when someone says one things and their actions prove completely different than what they tell me ,that is what boils my blood wink.gif
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Todd Simpson
post Jul 23 2014, 12:15 AM
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Some KILLER replies guys!!! Glad to see folks embracing change and seeing the glass as half full!!!


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Mith
post Jul 23 2014, 04:54 AM
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I like how its slowly changing in a way that gives the artist control of their own stuff. big music companies are getting smaller and smaller. This means small labels and unsigned bands are getting just as much air time (in respects to people listening to the music).

I think the simple way of looking at it is recording and distrubing is being an artist but making money frmo music is doing it live.

The one thing I do miss now that everything is slowly going electronic is there are less hard copies. I as a consumer love electronic copies of music but as an artist there is something magical about having music you wrote pressed on a CD. Feels like a big acomplishment.


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 23 2014, 11:11 AM
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I don't remember a thread with more positivity and agreement!!! It's great to see smile.gif Also, it's very good to see folks embrace the "new" way of things as an opportunity rather than bemoan the loss of the "good old days". This really is a great time to be a musician IMHO. We have GLOBAL reach and GLOBAL distribution available to us at minimal costs via soundcloud/youtube/cd baby/etc. So if your music is memorable, and listenable, and unique in some way (in other words, "good") you have just as much of a shot at folks hearing it and eventually buying it as anybody else does! Record Lable or not smile.gif

Todd


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Mith
post Jul 23 2014, 11:30 AM
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That and I think most people hate record labels getting fat profits off other peoples works


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klasaine
post Jul 23 2014, 03:48 PM
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Believe me, it's equally unfathomable to me too but 'vinyl' sales CONTINUE to grow.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/20...down_chart.html
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2014-06...es-dusty-groove
http://www.statista.com/statistics/188822/...tes-since-2009/
http://qz.com/232845/the-music-industrys-n...-vinyl-records/
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/on-...aretto-20140618
http://mashable.com/2014/01/07/vinyl-comeback/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tag/vinyl-sales/

Now it may be (probably is) a momentary blip for whatever nostalgia reason you wanna ascribe to it but folks are spending money on LPs.
Most bands new and old out here press some vinyl (with free download code included).

Of course the numbers in actual 'real' sales terms are miniscule compared to what a pop hit, regardless of medium, will still sell. But if you're doing it all DIY (i.e., no label, no manager, no prod co to take a %), then a vinyl 'record' with cool art WILL be your (as in you and the bands) highest grossing piece of merch (providing people like you of course). At this point, it's way cooler than a CD and you can get the full $15 (or even $20) bucks for it.

How long will it last? Probably not very. But I've mentioned pressing and selling 'vinyl' here at GMC since I started participating a little more than 18 months ago ... and so far, it's only gotten bigger.

Nostalgia = simplify, then exaggerate.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 23 2014, 03:50 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 23 2014, 05:10 PM
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A KILLER post about VINYL!! Despite Vinyl being a "Dead" format, it's doing HUGE numbers, comparatively anyway. Vinyl/Record sales continue to grow year to year. CD sales continue to shrink year to year. Even so, CD sales still far outnumber vinyl sales. But if this continues, vinyl will take over CDs as the main physical medium for music at some point. Which is a very odd thing indeed.

But as KLASAINE mentioned, NOSTALGIA is a very important factor. Especially in the Music Biz. Also, rarity, uniqueness, etc. So much so that buying Vinyl has become "Hip" again and every Metal/Extreme Metal band worth their sale is doing a "Special Edition Vinyl" release or rerelease. So if the fans want vinyl, I say give em Vinyl!!

Todd

QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 23 2014, 10:48 AM) *
Believe me, it's equally unfathomable to me too but 'vinyl' sales CONTINUE to grow.
since I started participating a little more than 18 months ago ... and so far, it's only gotten bigger.

Nostalgia = simplify, then exaggerate.


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klasaine
post Jul 23 2014, 06:33 PM
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Because this is an 'indie' themed thread I point out vinyl sales primarily because when you are truly DIY indie - i.e., "doing it yourself" - you keep ALL the money after costs.

If you sell 5000 units over a year (a pittance if people actually like you and come to gigs) at $15.00 a pop - that's $75,000.00

*The standard Discmakers price for vinyl is around $15,000.00 for 5000 lps (they are one of the most expensive). You can get it cheaper if you research. Sometimes, considerably cheaper.

- Record at home.
- Get it professionally mastered for both Vinyl and digital distribution.
- Do your own art work.
- Distribute it via your web site, Band Camp, at shows - however(?).

Is that all gonna cost you $55,000.00? No, it's not ... Is it easy? No, it's not.
If you're good and you do the necessary work ... and depending on how experienced you are with your home studio and what kind of deal you cut with the lp manufacturer and maybe the mastering studio/engineer - you can make a little bit of money.

Again, this is the 'old' DIY way. Make tapes, do some funky art work - sell 'em at shows.
Les Paul, that guy who's name is on your guitar, he made hit records in his garage in the 1940s and 50s.


In the 'old' days (notice I don't say good old days), if you and your band DIY'd it and sold 5000 copies of even a demo tape at shows - a record company would usually come calling

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 23 2014, 07:35 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 24 2014, 03:26 AM
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Yet another great post about the biz smile.gif This one GOLDEN NUGGET of info is invalueable!!

"after about 5000 units, record companies come calling". If you can manage to move 5000 units of just about anything, vinyl, CD, whatever, you are doing pretty darn well for yourself comparatively speaking and can be confident when approaching a label, if Label relationships are what you are after. They want to see that you have done the ground work. That you have a following. That you have moved some product. In short, that you are a "VIABLE BUSINESS PROPOSITION". That's really all they care about, as they are, after all, just a bank with a very relaxed dress code.

However, if you don't want a Label relationship, selling 5k units of anything looks great in your press kit and promo materials and can help quite a bit when you go looking for endorsements/sponsorships etc. It shows that you are a real entity as a group/band/etc. Labels and Vendors get emails every day from every youtube guitar player on earth saying "give me free stuff!, Watch my vid, I"m great!". Truth is, they don't care how well you play. They care about your ability to create and maintain an audience/following. So that should always be a top priority smile.gif

You can get "metrics" (e.g. hard numbers) in a variety of ways. Youtube views, facebook likes, twitter followers, downloads on itunes, plays on spotify, etc. All these things can support your claim that you are for real and deserve to be taken seriously.




QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 23 2014, 01:33 PM) *
Because this is an 'indie' themed thread I point out vinyl sales primarily because when you are truly DIY indie - i.e., "doing it yourself" - you keep ALL the money after costs.

If you sell 5000 units over a year (a pittance if people actually like you and come to gigs) at $15.00 a pop - that's $75,000.00

*The standard Discmakers price for vinyl is around $15,000.00 for 5000 lps (they are one of the most expensive). You can get it cheaper if you research. Sometimes, considerably cheaper.

- Record at home.
- Get it professionally mastered for both Vinyl and digital distribution.
- Do your own art work.
- Distribute it via your web site, Band Camp, at shows - however(?).

Is that all gonna cost you $55,000.00? No, it's not ... Is it easy? No, it's not.
If you're good and you do the necessary work ... and depending on how experienced you are with your home studio and what kind of deal you cut with the lp manufacturer and maybe the mastering studio/engineer - you can make a little bit of money.

Again, this is the 'old' DIY way. Make tapes, do some funky art work - sell 'em at shows.
Les Paul, that guy who's name is on your guitar, he made hit records in his garage in the 1940s and 50s.


In the 'old' days (notice I don't say good old days), if you and your band DIY'd it and sold 5000 copies of even a demo tape at shows - a record company would usually come calling



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klasaine
post Jul 24 2014, 06:08 PM
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LPs are not viable for a medium or larger sized record company (right now - and I doubt they'll ever be again) but for an independent artist that gets to keep all the profit, it seems to be a nice option. All depends on your 'clientele'.

I play with a band that's printing a 'comic book/graphic novella' to go along with the record (CD or download - no vinyl). You will also be able to use an app that reads a couple of the chapters - Aurasma. When you view the comic cell through your smart phone (with the app) the captions advance/read ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurasma

There's a lot of stuff out there that you can monetize alongside your music. What do people 'want'.
*The Beatles (Brian Epstein) were great at it! Fan club only releases, Christmas releases, B-sides, they had a comic strip and they made movies (totally revolutionary at the time) and promo films.

No one's re-inventing the wheel here in the 21st century.
The only real difference is how the end user/fan/consumer takes delivery. That's distribution - which has always been at the heart of the producer/consumer relationship.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 24 2014, 07:02 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 25 2014, 04:00 AM
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I agree all the way. LPS are not going to get "huge" they seem huge now due to the large year on year growth they are seeing compared to the year on year decline CDs are seeing.

The comic is a great idea! ANYTHING one can do to "Add Value" to the music is a GOOD THING. The music itself, sadly, is perceived by the preponderance of consumers as something that should be free. So it's the "value add" that gives the product it's appeal. It can be nearly anything of course. CDs housed in a small haunted house, an entire collection of music in lossless digital form on a usb key shaped like a SKULL, etc. Bands are getting very creative in their use of the "value added" concept. It's a good thing IMHO smile.gif

You are also spot on when you say one of the big thing that's changed is the distribution. The internet/web eliminated the need for the middle man. No longer are we chained to 5 inch pieces of plastic (cds). Anyone, anywhere can distribute anything at any time. It's a wonderful thing smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 24 2014, 01:08 PM) *
LPs are not viable for a medium or larger sized record company (right now - and I doubt they'll ever be again) but for an independent artist that gets to keep all the profit, it seems to be a nice option. All depends on your 'clientele'.

I play with a band that's printing a 'comic book/graphic novella' to go along with the record (CD or download - no vinyl). You will also be able to use an app that reads a couple of the chapters - Aurasma. When you view the comic cell through your smart phone (with the app) the captions advance/read ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurasma

There's a lot of stuff out there that you can monetize alongside your music. What do people 'want'.
*The Beatles (Brian Epstein) were great at it! Fan club only releases, Christmas releases, B-sides, they had a comic strip and they made movies (totally revolutionary at the time) and promo films.

No one's re-inventing the wheel here in the 21st century.
The only real difference is how the end user/fan/consumer takes delivery. That's distribution - which has always been at the heart of the producer/consumer relationship.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jul 25 2014, 04:01 AM


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