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> What's Your Favourite Scale / Mode ?, Version II
Ben Higgins
post Jul 28 2014, 12:14 PM
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I know Gabriel posted this question back in 2011 but I thought it was time to ask this question again because

1. Some GMCers weren't around then
2. Your choices may have changed !

So, what is your favourite mode ?

Here's the original thread because some of you may want to compare your older answers

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...=39245&st=0

My choice is probably the half / whole diminished scale. It's very exotic sounding. I love the combination of a flat5h and a dominant7th in the same scale. The Lydian Dominant is also very similar and just as cool but it has a major2nd instead of a minor 2nd.

This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Jul 28 2014, 12:15 PM


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Guido Bungenstoc...
post Jul 28 2014, 01:27 PM
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Good question!
So my favorite are:
Aeolian
Dorian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Pentatonic minor
Mixolydian hexatonic
Mixolydian #4( Lydian b7)
Lydian #5
HTWT
Altered
Aeolian b5

And all the rest :-D

This post has been edited by Guido Bungenstock: Jul 28 2014, 01:32 PM


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 28 2014, 01:29 PM
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QUOTE (Guido Bungenstock @ Jul 28 2014, 01:27 PM) *
Good question!
So my favorite are:
Aeolic
Dorian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Pentatonic minor
Mixolydian hexatonic
Mixolydian #4( Lydian b7)
Lydian #5
HTWT
Altered

And all the rest :-D


You got tabs for that ??

laugh.gif laugh.gif


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Guido Bungenstoc...
post Jul 28 2014, 01:30 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 28 2014, 12:29 PM) *
You got tabs for that ??

laugh.gif laugh.gif

Yeah, I have but you never won't get it! rolleyes.gif


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jul 28 2014, 01:37 PM
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QUOTE (Guido Bungenstock @ Jul 28 2014, 02:27 PM) *
Good question!
So my favorite are:
Aeolian
Dorian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Pentatonic minor
Mixolydian hexatonic
Mixolydian #4( Lydian b7)
Lydian #5
HTWT
Altered
Aeolian b5

And all the rest :-D


Is this in your order of priority?

I assume "HTWT" is half-tone whole-tone ?

Any info you can add about the more exotic ones will be appreciated. ie when and how do you use them - how would you recommend beginners (and scale noobs like me) to approach new scales/sounds?


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Guido Bungenstoc...
post Jul 28 2014, 01:43 PM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jul 28 2014, 12:37 PM) *
Is this in your order of priority?

I assume "HTWT" is half-tone whole-tone ?

Any info you can add about the more exotic ones will be appreciated. ie when and how do you use them - how would you recommend beginners (and scale noobs like me) to approach new scales/sounds?

Yeah, it's the half tone, whole tone. No specific order. Just right now I'm on the beach (family holiday) so i gonna answer this interesting question when I'm back home. :-D


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 28 2014, 02:54 PM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jul 28 2014, 01:37 PM) *
I assume "HTWT" is half-tone whole-tone ?

Any info you can add about the more exotic ones will be appreciated. ie when and how do you use them - how would you recommend beginners (and scale noobs like me) to approach new scales/sounds?


The half / whole diminished is a great sounding scale, I love it.

If you have an ambiguous power chord with no 3rd then you're free to abuse whatever mode you want over it but I particularly like to use this scale in place of the Phrygian Major mode because everyone uses it !

So if I had a progression that moved from D5 to D#5 and back again I might use it there. It gives a more Eastern sands kind of vibe. ph34r.gif


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Guido Bungenstoc...
post Jul 28 2014, 10:40 PM
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QUOTE (Guido Bungenstock @ Jul 28 2014, 12:27 PM) *
Mixolydian hexatonic
Mixolydian #4( Lydian b7)
Lydian #5
HTWT

And all the rest :-D

So let me explain some of these more "exotic sounding" scales.

First of all, before you experiment with these scales, it could be very helpful if you're familiar with the 7 classical modes like
Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, mixolydian, aeolian and locrian. These modes are a very good starting point and help to understand how the exotic scales are developed from these.

Mxolydian #4:
Also called lydian dominant or lydian b7 but i prefer more the name mixolydian #4 because has a more mixlodian touch rather than lydian. So the name already says it all: its a mixolydian scale with a#4( instead of the normal 4h. It comes from the melodic minor scale starting from the 4th step and has thees intervalls 1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, b7. So as you see it has "both of best worlds" here; lydian from the 1st to the 5th and mixolydian from the 5th to the b7. It works really good on dominant b7 chords of course!


Mixolydian hexatonic:
so what means hexatonic here? It just means 6 notes of a scale, same like pentatonic(5 notes). Basically it doesn't matter which 5/6 notes of the scale do you play, as long as they're diatonic(in key)
So if you have a mixolydian scale( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7) and just take out ONE note, you'll get the mixolydian hexatonic. In my case i take out the 2nd and I got this cool sounding rock scale( 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7).
If you take out the 6th as we'll, you'll get this ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, b7), also called mixolydian pentatonic(jan hammer scale), Jeff beck uses this a lot.

Lydian #5
This is the 3rd scale of melodic minor ( 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, 7) and it sounds a lot like the typical Lydian scale but more dramatic because of the #5. So the structure of this scale is like this: 1, 2, 3, #4, #5, 6, 7 . For example, The corresponding chord in A melodic minor would be Cmaj7/#5

HTWT(half tone-whole tone scale)
Really strange sounding scale if you're not used to it but with a lot of potential! Because of the symmetric structure, just half tone, whole tone, half tone, whole tone etc. you'll get a scale with 8(!) notes like this: 1, b2, b3, 3, b5, 5, 6, b7 and if you move this scale a 1 ½ step up or down you'll get the same scale and another 1 ½ step up or down you'll get the same scale etc. etc. (wow!). If you look at the intervals you'll find a lot of possible chords there. In the key of A you have these chords:
A, C, Eb, F#
A7(b5), C7(b5), Eb7(b5), F#7(b5)
A7/13(b5), C7/13(b5), Eb7/13(b5), F#7/13(b5)
A7(#9), C7#9), Eb7(#9), F#7(#9)
A7(b9), C7b9), Eb7(b9), F#7(b9)
Am, Cm, Ebm, F#m
Am7(b5), Cm7(b5), Ebm7(b5), F#m7(b5)
A Dim7, Bb Dim7, C Dim7, C# Dim7, Eb Dim7, E Dim7, F# Dim7, G Dim7
And slash chords like A/C, A/Eb, A/F# etc.

so as you see you can use this scale over a simple A7 blues Chord and it will spice up your playing a lot, because it's sounds a bit like the blues scale, has some mixolydian flair etc. Robben Ford is using this a lot.
I simply love this scale!


Ben, don't ask me for tabs here! biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Guido Bungenstock: Jul 29 2014, 08:54 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 29 2014, 06:16 PM
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I very much like the flavor of every mode smile.gif

To me, it's like being able to choose out of a big icecream selection that's right n front of me and each one has its distinct point of attraction.

I learned that the most important thing in playing with modes or all sorts of scales, is to learn the way in which the notes relate to the chords over which they are played and basically this is one of the most overlooked aspects in using them.

Usually people learn a lot of positions and have no clue what to do with them and then get bummed because they want to use modes and they feel no difference.

I started tinkering with a few Japanese scales, thanks to Sinisa's amazing lesson:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/45-Gui...es-In-One-Solo/

Check them out:

- Iwato
- Hirajoshi
- Japanese
- In Sen
- Yo
- Yona Nuki

They are based on a pentatonic structure and they will certainly spice up your playing, especially if you are into this kind of sound!


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 29 2014, 07:32 PM
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QUOTE (Guido Bungenstock @ Jul 28 2014, 10:40 PM) *
Mxolydian #4:
Also called lydian dominant


Yeah I really like that one. I discovered it by accident and later learned what it was called !


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Opetholic
post Jul 29 2014, 08:31 PM
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D-minor of course, saddest of all keys..



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Mith
post Jul 30 2014, 03:00 AM
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I've been messing around with the harmonic minor and its modes alot the last week or so. Nothing too outragous but so far it feels very natural for me to use. I don't know if its because I've gotten so use to the diatonic and its pretty close or its because I listen to alot of heavy music so I have gotten really use to its sound.

Think I might try get the melodic minor under my fingers as well.


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 30 2014, 08:50 AM
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QUOTE (Mith @ Jul 30 2014, 03:00 AM) *
Think I might try get the melodic minor under my fingers as well.


Yeah that's an interesting one that doesn't get talked about a lot.. I find that pops up in a lot of classical music so surprised it doesn't get much use or mention in guitar playing.


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Mith
post Jul 30 2014, 09:06 AM
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Yeah, I find the fact that its diffrent decending to accending.

Its kinda funny the fact people try and get into modes more to sound diffrent but keep going for the common ones.

Shame using modes of a pentatonic isn't as forfilling. One day I'm going to find a use for it lol


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Darius Wave
post Jul 30 2014, 01:38 PM
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I will only mention the one I cought myself abusing...it would be the Dorian mode smile.gif Just love it smile.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jul 30 2014, 02:00 PM
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Cosmin post made me remember that amazing lesson by Sinisa which is a proof of how many amazing scales and modes are there and how we can use them to create different vibes and feelings.

There is a killer series called "Exotic Scales" that include 31 lessons covering different weird scales that you should check!

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/lessonseries/Exotic-Scales/



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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 30 2014, 05:35 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jul 30 2014, 01:00 PM) *
Cosmin post made me remember that amazing lesson by Sinisa which is a proof of how many amazing scales and modes are there and how we can use them to create different vibes and feelings.

There is a killer series called "Exotic Scales" that include 31 lessons covering different weird scales that you should check!

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/lessonseries/Exotic-Scales/


I've had the pleasure of being involved in the proof reading of that one and boy did I enjoy the ride biggrin.gif It is tedious work indeed, but the idea in itself was extraordinary and I went over the tediousness, because of the cornucopia of scales used in there.

What have you guys created with the scales and modes you like, so far? C'mon, let's share some recordings!


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klasaine
post Jul 30 2014, 06:30 PM
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I don't really have a 'favorite' but when confronted with a static dominant chord groove I will gravitate towards Phrygian with a natural 3rd ... which you can also think of as the fifth mode of the harmonic minor scale. Example: F harm min starting on C = C Db E F G Ab Bb C.
A lot of the time I'll avoid the Ab. There's a rough out-line of a minor pentatonic/blues scale contained in there so classic 'guitar' licks can work great (very John McLaughlin).

Here's an old recording from a 'dead' website (in the key of F#). The trk loads fast so just click the play arrow anytime.
http://www.kenlasaine.com/audio/Full_Load.mp3

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 30 2014, 06:39 PM


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Jim S.
post Jul 30 2014, 08:36 PM
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My scale knowledge is pitiful and I think that this just reminded me that I need to know a few more. I never really played scales. I must have discouraged myself thinking I'd find a better way instead of working.

When I solo or write a cool lick it seems to be a harmonic minor or Phrygian. Recently I wrote a solo over a rick graham backing and used a whole tone scale to connect 2 parts. I never finished it but plan to hopefully soon.

Are there any good lessons you'd recommend that are around the 4-5 range?
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Ben Higgins
post Jul 30 2014, 09:07 PM
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QUOTE (Jim S. @ Jul 30 2014, 08:36 PM) *
Are there any good lessons you'd recommend that are around the 4-5 range?


There was the Modal Madness series by Zsolt. It's in the 6-7 range but it doesn't have to be played at the same speed as the original.. the shapes can be taken away and used

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/instructor/Zsolt-Galambos/

Thinking about it, Zsolt tunes to D standard so the scale names will need to be transposed a whole tone



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