Which Key?
Jacob North
Aug 2 2014, 04:18 PM
Post #1
Aug 2 2014, 04:18 PM
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I don't know which scale to use in this progression

, . . . , . . . , . , . , . . .
Em D C Cm Em

, . . . , . . . , . , . , . . .
Em D C Cm G


, = is when the chords change
. = beats


I want to learn the theory behind it, can anyone help me with this? I am a intermediate guitar player, but a beginner in music theory, so where can I start?

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This post has been edited by Jacob North: Aug 2 2014, 04:23 PM
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Gabriel Leopardi
Aug 2 2014, 05:46 PM
Post #2
Aug 2 2014, 05:46 PM
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Hi Jacob! In order to identify tonalities to know what scales can be used over a chord progression, you have to learn about harmony and theory.

This is a list of things you should work:


Intervals: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...t=0#entry644329

Scales: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48825

Triads: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48859

Chord construction: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48915

Chord progressions / Harmonizing scales: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=49797

Soloing over chord progressions: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=49799


The progression that you shared is in G major, but it has an extra chord (Cm) that is not part of the tonality but that is commonly used in song to get a different melodic effect. It can be explained in many ways but by now just identify it as the "infiltrate" chord that needs extra attention when you are soloing. You can solo over this progression using G major scale and switch to C minor arpeggio (C melodic minor scale) when Cm sounds.

Please check the links that I shared and let me know if you need some guidance with all that stuff. wink.gif

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Jacob North
Aug 3 2014, 03:08 PM
Post #3
Aug 3 2014, 03:08 PM
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Thank you!
So if the progression is Em7 D/E C/E Cm Em7
Is this E aeolian?

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This post has been edited by Jacob North: Aug 3 2014, 03:11 PM
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klasaine
Aug 3 2014, 03:39 PM
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Aug 3 2014, 03:39 PM
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That Cm chord is problematic for just using one scale over that progression.
Technically its in a different key.

Over the Cm hit an Eb note and avoid the E and F# from the E aeolian mode.

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This post has been edited by klasaine: Aug 3 2014, 04:17 PM
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Gabriel Leopardi
Aug 3 2014, 07:25 PM
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Aug 3 2014, 07:25 PM
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QUOTE (Jacob North @ Aug 3 2014, 11:08 AM) *
Thank you!
So if the progression is Em7 D/E C/E Cm Em7
Is this E aeolian?


Yes, it can be considered E aeolian, but Cm is not part of the tonality so, as klasaine said, you should be careful when that chord is sounding and switch to C minor arpeggio (avoid playing the note E, which is the major third of C, and play the minor: Eb).

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DeadZeppelin
Mar 20 2015, 12:56 PM
Post #6
Mar 20 2015, 12:56 PM
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Posts: 5
Joined: 26-February 15
QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Aug 2 2014, 04:46 PM) *
Hi Jacob! In order to identify tonalities to know what scales can be used over a chord progression, you have to learn about harmony and theory.

This is a list of things you should work:


Intervals: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...t=0#entry644329

Scales: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48825

Triads: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48859

Chord construction: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48915

Chord progressions / Harmonizing scales: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=49797

Soloing over chord progressions: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=49799


The progression that you shared is in G major, but it has an extra chord (Cm) that is not part of the tonality but that is commonly used in song to get a different melodic effect. It can be explained in many ways but by now just identify it as the "infiltrate" chord that needs extra attention when you are soloing. You can solo over this progression using G major scale and switch to C minor arpeggio (C melodic minor scale) when Cm sounds.

Please check the links that I shared and let me know if you need some guidance with all that stuff. wink.gif



i was about to post a topic about this. because i play for 10 years and only develop some techniques but my playing is without any logical explanation. my question is simple. for example ive created a song... to determine the key of this song should i include all the chords used in it. also for the solo part. should i take into consideration only the part underneath the solo .to extract its cords and then determine the scale or scales based on this extraction. thank you !


sorry for the necrobump

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Gabriel Leopardi
Mar 20 2015, 05:06 PM
Post #7
Mar 20 2015, 05:06 PM
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Hi friend, how are you?

Could you please share the song?

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DeadZeppelin
Mar 21 2015, 10:35 AM
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Mar 21 2015, 10:35 AM
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Hello and thanks for the fast answer. yes i`ll find the recording on my old pc and upload it in the next 7-8 hours. its a garage recording with laptop but you will get an idea Gabe. expect it soon

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DeadZeppelin
Mar 21 2015, 12:37 PM
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Mar 21 2015, 12:37 PM
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here is the song. i think that the progression in the solo part must be..
A G F and once again.. sorry for the poor recording and thanks in advance

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Attached File(s)
Attached File  Final_Flame___Before_The_Night.mp3 ( 12.83MB ) Number of downloads: 113
 
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Gabriel Leopardi
Mar 23 2015, 04:32 PM
Post #10
Mar 23 2015, 04:32 PM
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Hi mate, thanks for the song. About your question: Should I include all chords to determine the key of a song? not exactly but it helps to understand the whole thing. The thing that you need to discover is the overall "root", the note that seems to be dominating the whole thing. This one is usually the one that you can play to end the progression and give a release effect.

Once you have the root, you have to identify the quality of the tonality: Is it major? Is it minor? Is it anything else? A quick experiment that you can do is to play the root chord over the tune first as a major chord and then as a minor chord and try to hear which one fits best. Once you decide the root and if it's minor or major, you can write down all the chords used to see i they all belong to the tonality that you suspect the tune is.

In the case of your song, it's in A minor. So to re-check what I said before, play A note over the tune and hear how the whole thing seems to be in A and also notice how A could be used to end the tune and give it a "release" feel. Then, play A major and A minor each one as arpeggios (notes separated) and notice how Am sounds better.

Once you have this, you can write down the chords that belong to A minor tonality (you get them harmonizing the minor scale)

Am Bm-5 C Dm Em F G

Then write down the chords used on the song and check if all the chords belong to this tonality. If most of the chords are part of tis tonality, you can be sure that your song is in A minor, if you have a few "strangers", maybe they are borrowed from paralel keys, if you have many strangers, or a few but appearing very often, your tune could be in another minor tonality (dorian, phrygian, harmonic minor, melodic minor, locrian).

If you want to learn more about this please check this post: LINK

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