2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> How Much Warm Up Do You Really Need ?
Ben Higgins
post Aug 7 2014, 12:02 PM
Post #1


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



Here's a good video interview with John Petrucci. About 15 minutes in he talks about the stamina involved in playing a live show. The ironic thing is that most of us focus our practise time on lead guitar techniques. During band practise or live shows, we're going to be spending the least amount of time on lead playing and most of it on rhythm.

http://www.iguitarmag.com/magazine-edition...i_interviewmp4/

In case the video link doesn't work, you can find it the latest issue of Guitar Interactive http://www.iguitarmag.com/

He also talks about warming up before shows and how there doesn't seem to be a consistent way of ensuring a good night of playing. For a long time I've believed that our psychological approach when going to the guitar has a lot to do with whether we feel like we can 'do it' or not. I was pleased to see that John also comes to this conclusion too.

The reason I think this way is because I've gone through different periods of effectiveness and non effectiveness in my playing over the years. During the times where I believed that I needed to go through a specific routine for X amount of time, my playing would feel non confident, hesitant, unsure, weak. Physically I would feel like I was not as capable. I had psychologically set a scene and my hands followed it up. In short, I think that believing we need such a massive and extensive warm up is undermining our actual abilities.

I remember seeing some people saying things like if they didn't warm up for 1 hour 30 mins that would not be able to play. They said these things with such conviction too. It wasn't "If I don't warm up for 1hr 30 mins I might not feel ready" it was ".. I won't be able to play." Notice how definitive that statement is. That kind of thinking sets a definite negative outcome on a situation.

Ask yourself if you think that would improve your guitar session or make it less effective ?

I might be divisive in saying this but I'll say it anyway. If you think you've got to warm up for an hour or more just to play guitar then something's wrong. Somewhere along the line, you've either done something or experienced some sort of disappointing event in order to sap your confidence in your abilities to the point where you believe you have to go through some obsessively long compulsive ritual in order for things to 'go right'.

This is not hyperbole or conjecture. I know it to be true because I've lived it.

Warm up is really just about blood flow. And mindset. If you've got those two things happening then you're ready. smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 7 2014, 04:51 PM
Post #2


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.749
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



I agree.

For me, 10 to 15 minutes of playing before a gig lets my head and hands realize that in fact I do know how to play the guitar.
If I can hear everything when I'm up there and my sound is where I want it to be then I'm much more apt to play well. Definitely a 'comfort' thing for me.

A lot of folks have various rituals they go through before the gig that are more important to them than warming up on their instrument.
Adrian Belew likes to change his own strings.
Pat Metheny goes running.
Mike Stern swims.

It also (IMO) depends on how much you play/gig in general. If you gig 4 to 6 nights a week - ? Trust me, you're warmed up. If you only play once or twice a month you probably 'feel' less confident. Playing a lot the day of the gig is probably really important to get your head and hands into the place they need to be. Though it doesn't need to be right before the show.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Aug 7 2014, 05:04 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jstcrsn
post Aug 7 2014, 06:52 PM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.702
Joined: 29-March 08
From: kansas, USA
Member No.: 4.733



for the most part, my gigs, I did not have time to warm up. I was to busy setting up sound checking , things like that. But mental attitude , to me, was the number one factor.Don't get me wrong , as soon as I would strap on the guitar ,I would start playing the first couple of solo's in the set.

There was this certain sound tech, if we walked in and he was doin sound that would always put us in the right mood. We just new that was on less thing we would not have to worry about . Also having a crowd responsive was the second best warm up . Sure these factors did not mean we would have a bad gig , and we sort of felt like a true band can win the crowd , but one will take all the help he can get
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mertay
post Aug 7 2014, 07:16 PM
Post #4


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 2.602
Joined: 27-May 13
From: Turkey / izmir
Member No.: 18.294



To me, a need for long warmup is actually a matter of mindstate which is connected to timing.

I agree with Ben, this is certainly psychological but digging deeper (again, to me) one is disciplining his metronome sense more than his fingers which has nothing to do with blood flow.

I have a friend whos been playing for 10+ years as hobbyist, when he got into the recording route he had a very hard time (even with the most basic stuff like chord playing etc.) and still working hard with the metronome although he can play like basic petrucci solos from DT.

Guitar teachers who give private lessons knows this well, every students inner timing is different and must adapt to the song/exercise thats in front of him. In order for the student not rush into things, sometimes I chat for a short while to pull that natural time feel to a point that we can musically agree and work on.

This discipline improves only with metronome in a long period. It not only about guitar if you ask me, its a life lesson some has mastered in order to get along with such people that they have to biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Mertay: Aug 7 2014, 07:18 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Aug 7 2014, 07:36 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



QUOTE (klasaine @ Aug 7 2014, 04:51 PM) *
For me, 10 to 15 minutes of playing before a gig lets my head and hands realize that in fact I do know how to play the guitar.


Yes I think that "I can do this" mindset is key to picking up our guitar and getting good stuff out of it.

I think a lot of times people can get in the rut of sapping away their confidence by believing that they need to adhere to taking strict baby steps in some convoluted practise plan every day.

I feel that instead of picking up the guitar with joy each day they're hitting the reset button each time because they've got to tackle the gauntlet.

QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Aug 7 2014, 06:52 PM) *
There was this certain sound tech, if we walked in and he was doin sound that would always put us in the right mood. We just new that was on less thing we would not have to worry about . Also having a crowd responsive was the second best warm up .


Yeah, definitely. During gigs there comes a time before showtime (hopefully) where something in the air just hits and you're "on"

For me, I'm able to get "on" very quickly. Usually hearing AC/DC blasting over the PA does it for me. biggrin.gif As soon as I hear something like that I'm like "Come on.. let me up there !"

QUOTE (Mertay @ Aug 7 2014, 07:16 PM) *
To me, a need for long warmup is actually a matter of mindstate which is connected to timing.

I agree with Ben, this is certainly psychological but digging deeper (again, to me) one is disciplining his metronome sense more than his fingers which has nothing to do with blood flow.


I think that the timing issue is connected to our actual ability but not the issue of warming up. Even if we're great at timing it doesn't stop our hands being cold and stiff.

But being relaxed is key to having good timing and that aids the warm up so maybe you do have a point there.





--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Aug 7 2014, 08:52 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.146
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



I agree smile.gif 15 Minutes is usually plenty. I've played shows entirely cold before but it was not my fave way to go about it. Usually just a few minutes of waking the fingers up will do the trick and re introducing the left hand to the right hand to get them talking the same lingo smile.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 7 2014, 10:03 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.749
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



On bigger tours you do get a lot time between sound check and show.
You can definitely 'take your time' in those situations.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Aug 8 2014, 05:54 AM
Post #8


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 8 2014, 03:52 AM) *
I agree smile.gif 15 Minutes is usually plenty. I've played shows entirely cold before but it was not my fave way to go about it. Usually just a few minutes of waking the fingers up will do the trick and re introducing the left hand to the right hand to get them talking the same lingo smile.gif


I like the way you said wake up. Best way to describe it. Sure its a bit of blood flow but my hands always feel a little fumbly when cold and u kinda of have to get ur head ready for some mental gymnastics as well.


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PosterBoy
post Aug 8 2014, 08:02 AM
Post #9


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.425
Joined: 26-October 11
From: Galway, Ireland
Member No.: 14.225



I often have to gig with no warm up, and it's work. The days I play lots or have time to spend with my guitar before the gig, then it seems effortless, part of it is being warmed up but the most part is feeling at home on the neck, that it is an extension of you


--------------------
Currently Working on

PosterBoy's Modern Riffing with Gabriel

PosterBoy's Bootcamp with Todd



Gear
Tyler Burning Water 2K
Burny RLG90 with BK Emeralds
Fender US Tele with BK Piledrivers
Axe Fx Ultra - GCP Pro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Aug 8 2014, 09:28 AM
Post #10


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 7 2014, 08:52 PM) *
I agree smile.gif 15 Minutes is usually plenty. I've played shows entirely cold before but it was not my fave way to go about it. Usually just a few minutes of waking the fingers up will do the trick and re introducing the left hand to the right hand to get them talking the same lingo smile.gif


Yeah, going in cold is deffo not ideal. Unfortunately it was usually the way I did it during live gigs as I was so busy going around sorting everything out and making sure everyone else knew what was going on ! rolleyes.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Taka Perry
post Aug 8 2014, 02:10 PM
Post #11


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 642
Joined: 16-July 13
From: Australia
Member No.: 18.500



I gently pull back each finger and hold it there for around 10 seconds. Really helps me loosen up the finger muscles and helps with fluency before starting a show or gig!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SirJamsalot
post Aug 8 2014, 05:07 PM
Post #12


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.226
Joined: 4-May 10
From: Bay Area, California
Member No.: 10.312



I've pretty much given up on even trying to warm up before a show. There's too much going on to find a quiet place - loading equipment, and then there's people who walk up to chat, etc. These days I just make sure that the firs 2 songs don't have a difficult solo right out of the gate - I pretty much just warm up on stage.

In terms of having good/bad days - not being able to find a consistent routine - I've found that to be true of sport - some days your metabolism is "on fire" and able to do amazing things, and other days it's just not. Your physical "mood" is not something you can control (I don't think), so learning to deal with its valleys are typically the focus of pros - the mental aspect of the game, as you say.

My 2 cents.



QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Aug 7 2014, 04:02 AM) *
Here's a good video interview with John Petrucci. About 15 minutes in he talks about the stamina involved in playing a live show. The ironic thing is that most of us focus our practise time on lead guitar techniques. During band practise or live shows, we're going to be spending the least amount of time on lead playing and most of it on rhythm.

http://www.iguitarmag.com/magazine-edition...i_interviewmp4/

In case the video link doesn't work, you can find it the latest issue of Guitar Interactive http://www.iguitarmag.com/

He also talks about warming up before shows and how there doesn't seem to be a consistent way of ensuring a good night of playing. For a long time I've believed that our psychological approach when going to the guitar has a lot to do with whether we feel like we can 'do it' or not. I was pleased to see that John also comes to this conclusion too.

The reason I think this way is because I've gone through different periods of effectiveness and non effectiveness in my playing over the years. During the times where I believed that I needed to go through a specific routine for X amount of time, my playing would feel non confident, hesitant, unsure, weak. Physically I would feel like I was not as capable. I had psychologically set a scene and my hands followed it up. In short, I think that believing we need such a massive and extensive warm up is undermining our actual abilities.

I remember seeing some people saying things like if they didn't warm up for 1 hour 30 mins that would not be able to play. They said these things with such conviction too. It wasn't "If I don't warm up for 1hr 30 mins I might not feel ready" it was ".. I won't be able to play." Notice how definitive that statement is. That kind of thinking sets a definite negative outcome on a situation.

Ask yourself if you think that would improve your guitar session or make it less effective ?

I might be divisive in saying this but I'll say it anyway. If you think you've got to warm up for an hour or more just to play guitar then something's wrong. Somewhere along the line, you've either done something or experienced some sort of disappointing event in order to sap your confidence in your abilities to the point where you believe you have to go through some obsessively long compulsive ritual in order for things to 'go right'.

This is not hyperbole or conjecture. I know it to be true because I've lived it.

Warm up is really just about blood flow. And mindset. If you've got those two things happening then you're ready. smile.gif



--------------------
The more I practice, the more I wish I had time to practice!
My Band Forum: http://passionfly.site/chat

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 8 2014, 06:47 PM
Post #13


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.749
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (SirJamsalot @ Aug 8 2014, 09:07 AM) *
Your physical "mood" is not something you can control (I don't think), so learning to deal with its valleys are typically the focus of pros - the mental aspect of the game, as you say.


This is super important. I'm sure 'some' folks can actually control their physical mood by some mental process. I can't - other than to mentally prepare for the task at hand.
Knowing what you can or cannot pull off is a key element in performance.
When you're just not getting it, how do you deal with it? Do you 'go for it' and potentially urinate all over the song/show? Or, do you simplify and adjust? *We've all seen the figure skaters who don't go for the triple in the compulsory program.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Aug 8 2014, 07:06 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
HungryForHeaven
post Aug 8 2014, 07:50 PM
Post #14


Learning Tone Master
*

Group: Members
Posts: 835
Joined: 31-December 10
From: Sweden
Member No.: 11.929



A friend of mine, who plays a lot of shows and festivals (or at least used to) told me he likes to ask other performers for the night (presumably less experienced) to warm up his guitars. ph34r.gif

On topic: Since I don't gig much (at all), I'm answering from a practice session perspective. 10-15 minutes of light 5-string sweeps and/or diatonic scales does it for me.

QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Aug 7 2014, 06:36 PM) *
For me, I'm able to get "on" very quickly. Usually hearing AC/DC blasting over the PA does it for me. biggrin.gif As soon as I hear something like that I'm like "Come on.. let me up there !"

Are you saying AC/DC are opening for The Reckoning this autumn tour? How is Robert handling that?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Aug 8 2014, 08:14 PM
Post #15


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



I should add, that when I was making the thread I was mainly thinking about warming up for practise sessions rather than gigging but it's just as applicable, if not more so, when gigging as you're going to be doing it for a set amount of time.. you can't just say 'That's enough for me tonight everyone, hands are nice and sore now !' biggrin.gif

So I wasn't really thinking of the live aspect but it's interesting that it's gone that way anyway.

QUOTE (SirJamsalot @ Aug 8 2014, 05:07 PM) *
In terms of having good/bad days - not being able to find a consistent routine - I've found that to be true of sport - some days your metabolism is "on fire" and able to do amazing things, and other days it's just not. Your physical "mood" is not something you can control (I don't think), so learning to deal with its valleys are typically the focus of pros - the mental aspect of the game, as you say.


Yep, for sure.. there's just off days. I think we can still oil the machine and get the hands working even if we're not in a great mood but the quality of the playing itself probably won't be as top notch.

I know that if I'm not feeling it then my guitar playing will blow. smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Aug 9 2014, 03:26 AM
Post #16


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.146
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794





Good point!! As you mention, it does apply to both. I feel ya on playing gigs cold because there's barely time to tune the guitars again before lights up typically. Gigs are like warfare in that your plan falls apart as soon as the gig clock starts ticking smile.gif I don't know what, maybe I just have murphys law syndrome. smile.gif Seems like on gig night, strings pop, cars won't start, the tuner battery is dead, drummer forgot ANY sticks, etc. hehehehe. Ahh the glamour!!!

I can play rythm bits cold but playing crazy leads cold is just unpleasant imho smile.gif




QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Aug 8 2014, 03:14 PM) *
I should add, that when I was making the thread I was mainly thinking about warming up for practise sessions rather than gigging but it's just as applicable, if not more so, when gigging as you're going to be doing it for a set amount of time.. you can't just say 'That's enough for me tonight everyone, hands are nice and sore now !' biggrin.gif

So I wasn't really thinking of the live aspect but it's interesting that it's gone that way anyway.



Yep, for sure.. there's just off days. I think we can still oil the machine and get the hands working even if we're not in a great mood but the quality of the playing itself probably won't be as top notch.

I know that if I'm not feeling it then my guitar playing will blow. smile.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 9 2014, 06:58 AM
Post #17


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.749
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



In regard to 'practicing' I consider warming up part of practicing.
A lot of the time my practice consists only of exercises.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Aug 9 2014, 09:05 AM
Post #18


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 9 2014, 03:26 AM) *
I feel ya on playing gigs cold because there's barely time to tune the guitars again before lights up typically. Gigs are like warfare in that your plan falls apart as soon as the gig clock starts ticking smile.gif I don't know what, maybe I just have murphys law syndrome. smile.gif Seems like on gig night, strings pop, cars won't start, the tuner battery is dead, drummer forgot ANY sticks, etc. hehehehe. Ahh the glamour!!!


laugh.gif

Yep, I hear you on the 'cars won't start' thing and such like. Being in a band is like one big episode of Laurel and Hardy sometimes wink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Kristofer Dahl
post Aug 21 2014, 04:52 PM
Post #19


GMC Founder & Rocker
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.092
Joined: 15-August 05
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 2



My problem is that I tend to write stuff that is way too difficult for me too play - therefore I need substantial warming up before standing a chance to perform what I composed.

I should probably keep within my range, but...that's boring! It's the challenge that intrigues me.

To clarify - this is not a matter of pushing bpm (necessarily) - right now I am working on a ballad tune which requires a kind of bending and vibrato I have never done before. So to perform the song I need to go through each and every lick slowly first, in order to get the tone and phrasing I want. On top of that the song feature some fast playing which is also a bit above my level.

So I will easily "warm up" for an hour...to perform a three minute song! blink.gif

It might sound crazy, but currently this definitely seems to be the best method for me to improve.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guido Bungenstoc...
post Aug 22 2014, 12:36 AM
Post #20


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 424
Joined: 9-January 14
From: Hamburg/Germany
Member No.: 19.244



I think the whole key to warming up is NOT to play some stupid boring excercises on the guitar! It's all about just to be completely relaxed and prepared( mentally) for the things you want to play.
My way of warming up is just so simple and it works perfectly for me:
I just shake my both hands really strong but keeping my muscles of the complete arms totally relaxed(this is really important here!!) until they got a little bit warmer. During this time i try to feel positive and happy. This only takes about 2-3 minutes and then I'm totally warmed up. When I pick up the guitar after this short exercise, my hands just feel absolutely great. But not only my hands, my mind feels more open for the things I want to play now…!
I know it sounds a bit crazy and it's hard to explain but it works for me. During the last years I found out that warming up is something that happens in your head instead of your fingers. It's all about being relaxing your body and soul! :-)
Maybe this comes from Taiji I'm doing from time to time. :-)

This post has been edited by Guido Bungenstock: Aug 22 2014, 12:42 AM


--------------------
FIND ME HERE AT:
Guidorist.com | YouTube | Facebook | Soundcloud | Reverbnation | Bandcamp | Twitter

[soundcloud]http://soundcloud.com/guidorist/bad-world[/soundcloud]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 30th March 2017 - 01:49 AM