2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Guitar Ocd & Bad Habits, What holds us back ?
Ben Higgins
post Aug 18 2014, 11:10 AM
Post #1


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.788
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



Do you know those occasions where you stumble onto a good thing and you just keep playing and playing well past the point where you should have put the guitar down ?

That surely has to be one of the hardest temptations to resist. When you're in that situation a different mindset seems to take over that says 'More of this can only be a good thing. Keep going. I really should stop now. No, just a bit longer' This state of mind totally ignores the fact that as humans we can only compute a finite amount of input each day and can only make a finite amount of progress at something, both mental and physical. But of course, it's hard to let logic talk loud enough to be heard over our obsessive practising !

I'm sure we all overdo it like that or is just me ? Tell me it isn't just me ! biggrin.gif

I've read more than once that humans can only remember up to 7 things at a time. http://phys.org/news178220995.html I'm not sure exactly how true this is or even if it's been debunked or not, but I think it's pretty fair to say that our working memory can only remember so much. Of course, you can do tricks such as pinning images to words and phrases which make lists easier to recall but that doesn't really have much application with what we're talking about here. I've digressed but mnemonics is an interesting topic worthy of anyone's interest in their own time. It might help someone learning theory, for example. Names and order of modes etc.. anyway, back on topic..

People often find it hard to learn licks and phrases. Most likely it's because they're trying to work with too many notes and movements at one time. A run crossing all 6 strings could be broken down so not only can it be memorised PERFECTLY with no hesitation or dodgy notes that don't belong in there (essential if you want to actually learn and improve a lick) but it can actually be drilled and sped up comfortably in a way where the brain doesn't hold back our physical movement because it's lost track of allllllll the notes/ movements. That's why we break things up.

There's a term I hate called 'chunking'. I seriously dislike that term, it sounds horrible but it's applicable I guess. I haven't read much into it but it seems to be what I've naturally been doing with complicated sections of music. (If anyone uses this approach or knows more about it / or if I've got it wrong then feel free to discuss it here if it's relative to our discussion) Breaking things up into small, workable pieces that can be remembered and recalled easily by the brain is the only way you can properly build co ordination in both hands, speed and dexterity. To me it's just common sense but I guess some people need magic names for things.

Guthrie Govan demonstrates an excellent use of learning a lick (and putting it up to speed quite quickly) whilst using a few notes and adding a new note each time) Check from about 2:30 or watch the whole video, it's really good as always.



I've kind of gone off tangent a bit. I was originally just going to talk about bad habits and playing too much when we know we shouldn't but it's veered off into another territory which is just as interesting. But to bring it back to my original intentions I wanted to discuss some common bad habits that us guitarists, or musicians in general, tend to make that can hamper our progress and create more frustration for us. Can you think of any ?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Aug 19 2014, 05:23 AM
Post #2


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.016
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



I'd say PLAYING TO THE POINT OF PAIN. Bit of a problem from my own past!!!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 19 2014, 05:58 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.884
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



I too have heard that but no, I don't buy that "only 7 things at a time" stuff. Maybe if it's 7 totally unrelated things - ?
But we're talking about music here. Musical things can be related to each other. Understanding those relationships is key to not getting confused and distracted. Application of technique or concept.
If you focus on a certain aspect of your practicing, you absolutely can work for hours and accomplish a whole lot. And yes 'chunking' is a pretty standard way to work on complicated passages. Whether it's a long classical guitar piece or an Alan Holdsworth solo - just a bit at a time is what will get you there. You need to be patient and understand that it will take a long time.

The key word here is FOCUS.
Don't be 'all over the place' i.e., oh lets do some tapping, now finger picking, how about that classical etude I was working on and I really need to learn that Ritchie Blackmore 'Highway Star' solo but instead I think I'll work on that cool jazz chord thing I saw a guy doing on youtube - where was that anyway? Oh but wait, here's a really funny cat video ... etc.

A cool 'long' practice phase could be, "so how do I make my 1-chord jam solos not so f'ing boring? Lets find some other guitarists solos/licks that aren't a complete wank, transcribe them, figure how and why they work and then apply that to some jams that I'm working on or that my band plays". That should actually keep you busy a few hours a day for a few months at least.

The great players - all of them, any style, any era - work/worked consistently long and hard for many years. 4 to 6 or more hours a day for 6 to 10 years solid. After that (providing you actually did learn something and got pretty good) you can back off on the hours ... because at that point you are 1) probably 'working' as a musician in some capacity and have your axe in hand a lot of the day anyway and 2) you know how to get the most out of a shorter practice time.

*And as I always say, If you don't apply it to real music you won't retain anything anyway. The heavy 'practicers' from Steve Vai to John Coltrane always had a band to try out the stuff they were working on.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Aug 19 2014, 06:20 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 19 2014, 08:08 AM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



I think that Ken pretty much said it all with Focus smile.gif

We are living in an era in which focus has become a skill which could be taught in schools. It's that bad we have become with it, that we need to actually learn how to focus instead of having this as a natural weapon.

Another bad habit is practicing without applying - look I can play 111 string arpeggios. Ok, where did you implement them? Nowhere, but look how fast I can play them smile.gif These things go away with experience and with becoming conscious of an opportunity.

What do I mean by that? You get a gig or a spot in a band and suddenly, it might come to you that you need to focus on a totally different set of things to make it smile.gif Who cares how fast you can play, if you can't serve a groove and you can't serve the music you are playing? Some people need a wake up call - a bit brutal sometimes, but most of the times, it's efficient wink.gif

How was your wake up call?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Aug 19 2014, 09:22 AM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.788
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 19 2014, 05:23 AM) *
I'd say PLAYING TO THE POINT OF PAIN. Bit of a problem from my own past!!!


Yep, this is a biggie and a classic muso problem !!

Yes, focus is definitely one of the most important things to develop and retain throughout practise. One of the earliest comments in the book Zen Guitar was about picking up the guitar with the mind of doing something. If you want to just noodle aimlessly whilst watching tv, then pick up the guitar with that in mind. But if you want to work on something, then pick it up with that in mind and stay on track.

Then you can watch as many cat videos as you want afterwards wink.gif

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 19 2014, 08:08 AM) *
look I can play 111 string arpeggios.


TABS ??????





tongue.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Arpeggio
post Aug 19 2014, 01:39 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 114
Joined: 1-June 12
Member No.: 15.994



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Aug 19 2014, 05:23 AM) *
I'd say PLAYING TO THE POINT OF PAIN. Bit of a problem from my own past!!!


Definitely same here.

I’ve got a “Physio Clinic Prevention of Injury for Musicians” booklet (from a relative) in front of me now, and it says “When practising try to take micro breaks of 15 seconds every 5 minutes” and “After 20 minutes practise take a 5 minute break”.

For the last 2 years or so I’ve been using a HIIT timer set to 10 minutes playing, 2 minutes rest, 10 min play 2 min rest etc. I use the 2 mins to choose a note and tap it in all locations of the fret-board with my plucking hand so that I am resting the fretting hand, learning the notes of the fret-board and practising a bit of right hand tapping all at the same time.

Obviously that doesn’t work if the main thing practised in the 10 mins is tapping with the plucking hand, but that’s only a small part or my practise regime anyway.


QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Aug 18 2014, 11:10 AM) *
I'm sure we all overdo it like that or is just me ? Tell me it isn't just me ! biggrin.gif


I think if you are practising properly with concentrated effort then you can keep going for as long as you are comfortable with. Concentration can only last so long but if you still have it without making mistakes from wearing out then keep going if you like, although the brain should not overrule your body when it comes to when you need to stop.

It is known that it's hard to take in and retain a large amount of information in a short period of time. Whether that applies to doing it more or less everyday also (as opposed to over a day or two) I don’t know.… just incase, I like to tie in as many aspects of different practise areas as possible; e.g. the scale(s) I practise to the metronome will be the same one(s) I use for ear training, and then for improvisation. Same thing for 2 - 3 days.


QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 19 2014, 08:08 AM) *
We are living in an era in which focus has become a skill which could be taught in schools. It's that bad we have become with it, that we need to actually learn how to focus instead of having this as a natural weapon.


Once a while ago, for something I was doing, I needed to think of the musical alphabet backwards from the note of G. Out of curiosity I asked my dad if he could, and he did it fast with ease. I was confused how he could do that and his answer was that he was schooled in the 50’s!


--------------------
Founder of new startup social network site that brings the good aspects of MySpace, Twitter and FaceBook together.

MyTwitFace.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
VilleFIN
post Aug 19 2014, 03:01 PM
Post #7


Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.427
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Finland
Member No.: 4.519



What about this:

I have had couple of situations where I just basically sit with a guitar and try to make a song. Like 2-3 hours straight. I'm not sure why I'm not stopping it ? Am I fearing that I lose my inspiration or something ?
And afterwards when I listen what I have recorded - there's a lots of crap stuff.

Gosh, now I sound like a total weirdo.
Am I normal, Dr. Ben ?

biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by WeePee: Aug 19 2014, 03:02 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 19 2014, 03:13 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.884
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



You're totally normal.

Honestly, 2 to 3 hours is not really much time at all. If you get one usable thing out of that then you're doing well.
Most of what an artist comes up with is discarded.

The road to success is paved with failure.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Aug 19 2014, 04:14 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jstcrsn
post Aug 19 2014, 04:51 PM
Post #9


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.857
Joined: 29-March 08
From: kansas, USA
Member No.: 4.733



QUOTE (WeePee @ Aug 19 2014, 03:01 PM) *
What about this:

I have had couple of situations where I just basically sit with a guitar and try to make a song. Like 2-3 hours straight. I'm not sure why I'm not stopping it ? Am I fearing that I lose my inspiration or something ?
And afterwards when I listen what I have recorded - there's a lots of crap stuff.

Gosh, now I sound like a total weirdo.
Am I normal, Dr. Ben ?

biggrin.gif

asking Dr. Ben for psychiatric help . sort of a self answering question , isn't it ohmy.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Aug 19 2014, 08:37 PM
Post #10


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.788
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



QUOTE (WeePee @ Aug 19 2014, 03:01 PM) *
What about this:

I have had couple of situations where I just basically sit with a guitar and try to make a song. Like 2-3 hours straight. I'm not sure why I'm not stopping it ? Am I fearing that I lose my inspiration or something ?
And afterwards when I listen what I have recorded - there's a lots of crap stuff.

Gosh, now I sound like a total weirdo.
Am I normal, Dr. Ben ?

biggrin.gif


It's just one of those situations where you try to force something to happen and it's always never as good as if it just came naturally. I've had loads of those times. I have to resign myself to the fact that when I'm not inspired to write, it just isn't happening rolleyes.gif

As for being normal ? Do you want me to answer that honestly ?





laugh.gif



QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Aug 19 2014, 04:51 PM) *
asking Dr. Ben for psychiatric help . sort of a self answering question , isn't it ohmy.gif


laugh.gif

I would say more like a self defeating question !! biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 20 2014, 07:50 AM
Post #11


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



QUOTE (Arpeggio @ Aug 19 2014, 12:39 PM) *
Definitely same here.

I’ve got a “Physio Clinic Prevention of Injury for Musicians” booklet (from a relative) in front of me now, and it says “When practising try to take micro breaks of 15 seconds every 5 minutes” and “After 20 minutes practise take a 5 minute break”.

For the last 2 years or so I’ve been using a HIIT timer set to 10 minutes playing, 2 minutes rest, 10 min play 2 min rest etc. I use the 2 mins to choose a note and tap it in all locations of the fret-board with my plucking hand so that I am resting the fretting hand, learning the notes of the fret-board and practising a bit of right hand tapping all at the same time.

Obviously that doesn’t work if the main thing practised in the 10 mins is tapping with the plucking hand, but that’s only a small part or my practise regime anyway.




I think if you are practising properly with concentrated effort then you can keep going for as long as you are comfortable with. Concentration can only last so long but if you still have it without making mistakes from wearing out then keep going if you like, although the brain should not overrule your body when it comes to when you need to stop.

It is known that it's hard to take in and retain a large amount of information in a short period of time. Whether that applies to doing it more or less everyday also (as opposed to over a day or two) I don’t know.… just incase, I like to tie in as many aspects of different practise areas as possible; e.g. the scale(s) I practise to the metronome will be the same one(s) I use for ear training, and then for improvisation. Same thing for 2 - 3 days.




Once a while ago, for something I was doing, I needed to think of the musical alphabet backwards from the note of G. Out of curiosity I asked my dad if he could, and he did it fast with ease. I was confused how he could do that and his answer was that he was schooled in the 50’s!


Heh, all true words here wink.gif

My mom and dad had far better schooling than I did and I myself have had far better schooling than today's generations, for certain. I am looking at young folks today and they are so proud for passing their highschool degree - DUDE, that's NORMAL! It's not something you have to be proud of, it's something like eating your breakfast. It should be understood that you will pass it... But hell, this world is going down in flames and people tend to become stupider by the day.

About the breaks - yeah man, that's a healthy habit indeed. I usually practice for 2 hours in the morning and 2 in the evening. I take 5 minute breaks each 30 minutes, as i mainly focus on singing and playing in the same time or recording and working on song writing. When I work on my chops, I usually take breaks a bit more often - let's say 10 minutes practicing and 1 minute break. I tend to stretch out, have some water and walk a bit around the studio. After a good guitar practice, a iaijutsu 30 minute training will work wonders on cooling the mind and keeping the spirit focused, but that's just me - there are other means to do that, meditation being one of them smile.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Caelumamittendum
post Aug 20 2014, 12:51 PM
Post #12


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 4.617
Joined: 14-June 08
From: Copenhagen, Denmark
Member No.: 5.298



I've had a bit of a bad habit thinking things will come as easy as they used to. They don't anymore. So I need to put in more footwork and not just be like: "Okay, I'll play this twice at half the speed it's supposed to be played at and then I'll consider it learnt!". That's my bad habit which I've somewhat gotten a hold of though.

Another thing is that I lose interest if I don't see any immediate and quick progress in my playing. I wouldn't say that I give up then, but I just tend to not push properly through the walls I hit.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jstcrsn
post Aug 20 2014, 01:07 PM
Post #13


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.857
Joined: 29-March 08
From: kansas, USA
Member No.: 4.733



QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Aug 20 2014, 12:51 PM) *
"Okay, I'll play this twice at half the speed it's supposed to be played at and then I'll consider it learnt!". That's my bad habit which I've somewhat gotten a hold of though.

mine is like this but opposite, I will rush it , not playing it slow and perfect , knowing its good enough for the " live curve" and then moving on
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Arpeggio
post Aug 20 2014, 08:04 PM
Post #14


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 114
Joined: 1-June 12
Member No.: 15.994



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 20 2014, 07:50 AM) *
Heh, all true words here wink.gif

My mom and dad had far better schooling than I did and I myself have had far better schooling than today's generations, for certain. I am looking at young folks today and they are so proud for passing their highschool degree - DUDE, that's NORMAL! It's not something you have to be proud of, it's something like eating your breakfast. It should be understood that you will pass it... But hell, this world is going down in flames and people tend to become stupider by the day.


From my experience half-baked non-strict teachers tend to be favourable to kids (but that’s hardly a surprise!). As a kid at the time you go with it, even don’t mind, but it’s not your responsibility, you’re not the teacher. Looking back as an adult though, in high-sight, it’s an outrage.

I liked science because it was about real things. I didn’t like maths the way I was taught, never understood the point. To me it was a bit like a fantasy world not of reality, like, I dunno…..mock sword fighting or playing with Barbie dolls (if you’re a girl!) except completely and pointlessly serious. The nearest we got to application was “If Jimmy had 5 apples and gave Jill 2 etc..”.

The stupid thing is that all maths came about in the first place as a need to solve a practical situation. It’s like music school not allowing you to touch an instrument.

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 20 2014, 07:50 AM) *
About the breaks - yeah man, that's a healthy habit indeed. I usually practice for 2 hours in the morning and 2 in the evening. I take 5 minute breaks each 30 minutes, as i mainly focus on singing and playing in the same time or recording and working on song writing. When I work on my chops, I usually take breaks a bit more often - let's say 10 minutes practicing and 1 minute break. I tend to stretch out, have some water and walk a bit around the studio.


For practicing to play fast I think it makes for better progress too, hence the 10 / 1 on your chops no doubt. You won’t see Usain Bolt doing 100m then thinking “could have done better” then going again straight away and just doing that again and again getting slower each time!

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 20 2014, 07:50 AM) *
After a good guitar practice, a iaijutsu 30 minute training will work wonders on cooling the mind and keeping the spirit focused, but that's just me - there are other means to do that, meditation being one of them smile.gif


Definitely. I do Yoga sometimes. Exercise is important, especially for the sedentary lifestyle of a musician and more so the longer you practise.

Nowadays the doctors are saying how sitting down for too long is bad for you, deadly even. In the music biz Trevor Nelson DJ uses an adjustable stand / sit desk. Facebook and Google staff use them too. Soon I’m going to make an adjustable stand / sit desk, then I can pause / play GMC videos while stood up playing! (I’m standing with my keyboard and mouse on top of a sideways speaker and box at moment but I have to look down at the monitor).


QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Aug 20 2014, 12:51 PM) *
Another thing is that I lose interest if I don't see any immediate and quick progress in my playing. I wouldn't say that I give up then, but I just tend to not push properly through the walls I hit.


Someone seeing your progress e.g. once a month will notice more difference. You are always there for every second of every minute of your own playing, therefore the difference of progress will be much more incremental.

Learning progress doesn’t happen on a straight upward line either, it’s more up and down while generally going upward. The brain has memory consolidation phases, the longest being about 1 month, in which skills are ingrained and you may not seem as able to take on more. Once one of these phases is over, may be the explanation as to why sometimes something just “clicks”.






--------------------
Founder of new startup social network site that brings the good aspects of MySpace, Twitter and FaceBook together.

MyTwitFace.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM
Post #15


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



Arpeggio - I used to curse my strict teachers and now, I realize how much good they were doing smile.gif But as you said, as a kid - all work and no play... meh, that's not too nice, innit?

Hah! You mentioned sword play biggrin.gif I am a fencer and proud of it tongue.gif Not useless at all, if you extrapolate the advantages - of course, I won't take my blade out on the streets to deliver swift justice to the wrongdoers. But here's what I'm winning out of it:

- attention to details
- discipline
- applying fluid and slow practice
- increased focus power
- increased reaction time
- understanding intentions
- estimating and understanding distances

A healthy mind in a healthy body - at least that's what I'm striving for. It's easy to get lost in a day and not do anything for your body. Suddenly, in a few years you realize that you are dizzy from leaning down to tie your shoelaces. I don't want to get there smile.gif

Discipline is important, so that you may be able to have a healthy guitar practice schedule, workout and of course, see to your life/job/family. It is POSSIBLE smile.gif But most folks want TV and all sorts of distracting things, because they are easy. I don't blame anyone, I am just saying that keeping a strict schedule means sacrificing some things.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Arpeggio
post Aug 28 2014, 05:11 PM
Post #16


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 114
Joined: 1-June 12
Member No.: 15.994



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM) *
Arpeggio - I used to curse my strict teachers and now, I realize how much good they were doing But as you said, as a kid - all work and no play... meh, that's not too nice, innit?


Yes, “firm but fair” as they say, they need to be personable too. Some of the stricter teachers didn’t seem to have that balance and it was all or nothing. That said, that is probably better than a half-baked teacher.

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM) *
Hah! You mentioned sword play I am a fencer and proud of it Not useless at all, if you extrapolate the advantages - of course, I won't take my blade out on the streets to deliver swift justice to the wrongdoers.


You’d have to think of a superhero name and what costume to wear before you even *think* about that. “The Cosmic Guitar Chop” could work well with the alteration of your name to “Cosmic” and double meaning of the word “Chop” for guitar and sword. The only problem being the name alludes to your by day alter-ego which could give the game away.

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM) *
But here's what I'm winning out of it:

- attention to details
- discipline
- applying fluid and slow practice
- increased focus power
- increased reaction time
- understanding intentions
- estimating and understanding distances


I might be wrong but I believe slow Tai Chi is done so that when you execute the moves fast they are done accurately. Fluid and slow practise as you say, sounds similar to practising guitar slow at first.

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM) *
A healthy mind in a healthy body - at least that's what I'm striving for.


Very much agreed. The brain is mostly made of fat, basically a white mass of fat that houses and insulates its structure of nerves, so eating the right kind and amount of fats within our food can affect ones intelligence. Interestingly over 80% of the bodies seratonin receptors are not in the brain, but actually in the gut.

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM) *
It's easy to get lost in a day and not do anything for your body. Suddenly, in a few years you realize that you are dizzy from leaning down to tie your shoelaces. I don't want to get there


True, if short for time I usually do a minimum for maintenance of health. I pushed too far recently and was in the doctors the other day (hence this late reply), won’t say more on that one. Someone once jokingly said to me “Exercise is bad for your health you can get all kinds of injuries”.

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 21 2014, 07:43 AM) *
Discipline is important, so that you may be able to have a healthy guitar practice schedule, workout and of course, see to your life/job/family. It is POSSIBLE But most folks want TV and all sorts of distracting things, because they are easy. I don't blame anyone, I am just saying that keeping a strict schedule means sacrificing some things.


I believe neither Vai, Gilbert or many other guitarists of that era grew up with a TV let alone the internet. Too many distractions nowadays and there is much less naturally in our lifestyles that will improve our minds and body. I think it’s like food; before the 1950’s people tended to have healthy diets anyway, then with mass production it got worse, until at present we start to backtrack, making things that were once normal have a need to be specified such as “organic”. In terms of lifestyle that might be things like the sit stand desk. Firefoxes “Leachblocker” add on, and cardio vascular equipment of course, and the treadmill desk.


--------------------
Founder of new startup social network site that brings the good aspects of MySpace, Twitter and FaceBook together.

MyTwitFace.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Aug 28 2014, 06:02 PM
Post #17


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.884
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Arpeggio @ Aug 28 2014, 09:11 AM) *
I think it’s like food; before the 1950’s people tended to have healthy diets anyway, then with mass production it got worse, until at present we start to backtrack, making things that were once normal have a need to be specified such as “organic”. In terms of lifestyle that might be things like the sit stand desk. Firefoxes “Leachblocker” add on, and cardio vascular equipment of course, and the treadmill desk.


laugh.gif Yes, artisan or craft anything from donuts to beer to bread ... the over glorification of stuff that's everyday normal.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 29 2014, 07:40 AM
Post #18


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



QUOTE (Arpeggio @ Aug 28 2014, 04:11 PM) *
Yes, “firm but fair” as they say, they need to be personable too. Some of the stricter teachers didn’t seem to have that balance and it was all or nothing. That said, that is probably better than a half-baked teacher.



You’d have to think of a superhero name and what costume to wear before you even *think* about that. “The Cosmic Guitar Chop” could work well with the alteration of your name to “Cosmic” and double meaning of the word “Chop” for guitar and sword. The only problem being the name alludes to your by day alter-ego which could give the game away.



I might be wrong but I believe slow Tai Chi is done so that when you execute the moves fast they are done accurately. Fluid and slow practise as you say, sounds similar to practising guitar slow at first.



Very much agreed. The brain is mostly made of fat, basically a white mass of fat that houses and insulates its structure of nerves, so eating the right kind and amount of fats within our food can affect ones intelligence. Interestingly over 80% of the bodies seratonin receptors are not in the brain, but actually in the gut.



True, if short for time I usually do a minimum for maintenance of health. I pushed too far recently and was in the doctors the other day (hence this late reply), won’t say more on that one. Someone once jokingly said to me “Exercise is bad for your health you can get all kinds of injuries”.



I believe neither Vai, Gilbert or many other guitarists of that era grew up with a TV let alone the internet. Too many distractions nowadays and there is much less naturally in our lifestyles that will improve our minds and body. I think it’s like food; before the 1950’s people tended to have healthy diets anyway, then with mass production it got worse, until at present we start to backtrack, making things that were once normal have a need to be specified such as “organic”. In terms of lifestyle that might be things like the sit stand desk. Firefoxes “Leachblocker” add on, and cardio vascular equipment of course, and the treadmill desk.


Well, the system nowadays doesn't allow us to have a moment of rest, in which we can take the proverbial two steps back and think: WHAT THE HELL AM I DOING WITH MY LIFE?

We tend to become little robots in a huge system and few are those who are fortunate or strong enough to break away and live fully. Life can be a really simple and enjoyable thing, if you manage to be free of possessions - no one said you should be a hermit, but no one said you NEED to have the last iPhone or the priciest car smile.gif Have enough to fulfill your living needs and no more. The more you want to acquire in terms of material wealth, the more chained you are to it.

There's this amazing website that I'm subscribed to: http://zenhabits.net/

You will find a lot about how to apply Zen teachings to a modern life smile.gif And in respect to guitar and martial arts - there are SO MANY similarities smile.gif You talked about Tai Chi - it teaches fluid and slow movements which are always round - they never stop, just like in sword play. We study a lot of the kata in Kenjutsu, based on the flow taught in Tai Chi so why not apply it in guitar playing?

Select a phrase - a longer one.

1) Listen to it and remember it
2) Understand its timing, pulse, note length and accents
3) Practice it segmented if needed
4) Put it up as a whole and practice it slow and fluid
5) Raise the tempo and keep the fluidity
6) As you reach the desired tempo implement it in a musical context - does it flow? Can you execute effortlessly and with expression?

These are the steps to mastering any lick or phrase, but most people get stuck at steps 1) and 2) because they want to play fast and they neglect UNDERSTANDING what they are playing, which should be the first step in everything you learn smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Sep 1 2014, 11:47 PM
Post #19


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.016
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Very good advice on taking breaks!!! I've worked in to an almost instinctive break ritual while playing so as to let the hands / arms recover. Thankfully, the time needed for recovery has gotten shorter over time.

One BIG change is that I used to stop what I was doing to "Practice", it seems that these days, I"m sort of in a constant state of either writing/playing/practicing to some degree whether I"m holding a guitar or not and I keep a mult fx unit hooked up to headphones near my bed with a guitar in addition to my studio setup so there is always a guitar around ready to.

So now I'm able to spend more time than I used to practicing/playing simply because I leave at lease one guitar/rig out and set up so I grab it whenever I walk by it or carry the guitar off somewhere else to play while doing something else.

If I'm learning new bits, I will usually require more focus. But once I write a new pattern or something, I usually need to play it A TON before it's ready to share and the repetition just takes guitar time. smile.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Arpeggio
post Sep 17 2014, 11:54 AM
Post #20


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 114
Joined: 1-June 12
Member No.: 15.994



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 29 2014, 07:40 AM) *
The more you want to acquire in terms of material wealth, the more chained you are to it.


That’s what many companies are hoping for I’m sure you know. Planned obsolescence:

http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/milesto...0411-36gjq.html

QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 29 2014, 07:40 AM) *
We study a lot of the kata in Kenjutsu, based on the flow taught in Tai Chi so why not apply it in guitar playing?

Select a phrase - a longer one.

1) Listen to it and remember it
2) Understand its timing, pulse, note length and accents
3) Practice it segmented if needed
4) Put it up as a whole and practice it slow and fluid
5) Raise the tempo and keep the fluidity
6) As you reach the desired tempo implement it in a musical context - does it flow? Can you execute effortlessly and with expression?

These are the steps to mastering any lick or phrase, but most people get stuck at steps 1) and 2) because they want to play fast and they neglect UNDERSTANDING what they are playing, which should be the first step in everything you learn smile.gif


Exactly, they are playing how they want to sound rather than how they can play and working their way up to it.

Painting a picture and exhibiting it compared to practising an instrument and performing it, are similar yet very different.
In the former you are doing quite different things between “practise” and “performance”; slowly painting it with a brush getting all the details, colours and shades, then later when exhibiting it you are doing nothing like that.

In the latter you are doing the same thing in practise as performance; you are playing the instrument. I think that’s an underlying trap that makes people practise how they want to sound. Practising guitar too fast is like looking at a blank canvass and trying to see a painting on it. I think it can help to look at guitar practise like painting a picture, that being the equivalent of 3), 4), 5) and 6).

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 1 2014, 11:47 PM) *
Very good advice on taking breaks!!! I've worked in to an almost instinctive break ritual while playing so as to let the hands / arms recover. Thankfully, the time needed for recovery has gotten shorter over time.


Same here. I stretch too. It backfired on me once. With more limber hands beneficial for guitar, the carpals / metacarpals are more limber and easier to dislodge. A builders hands, for example, will be less mobile (relatively) as suited to their work. I once pushed a cordless screwdriver very hard, something slipped in my wrist and I couldn’t play guitar for 2 weeks afterwards. I think arm wrestling should be out of the question for guitarists also.

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 1 2014, 11:47 PM) *
I usually need to play it A TON before it's ready to share and the repetition just takes guitar time.


Tell me about it!


--------------------
Founder of new startup social network site that brings the good aspects of MySpace, Twitter and FaceBook together.

MyTwitFace.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th September 2017 - 06:51 AM