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> Replacing Strings, How many wraps?
Hexabuzz
post Sep 26 2014, 01:38 AM
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Silly question, but...

I'm so used to using locking tuners, and just tightening them and clipping the ends, that I've run into trouble using traditional tuning pegs.

Is there a formula or rule of thumb as to how much extra length to use so that you get the proper number of wraps around the peg when you tune up?
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Mith
post Sep 26 2014, 02:03 AM
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if you hold the string at the peghead and then lift the string up about a handspan. that will give you around 2 turn and I always go one above and one below. Trick is you don't need as many turns on the string as most people think and having to many mean it can slip a tiny bit and create tuning instablility. Also lubricate your nut.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 26 2014, 05:34 PM
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I usually wound the string about 3-4 times around and then put it through the peg and then stretch it out. I only have the locking tuners on one guitar and I find then very useful, but up to this point I was very used to the procedure mentioned above. It's important to stretch the string after tightening it up, because it will settle in better and it will stay in tune. The thing is, people usually forget to stretch the strings when replacing them and thus the guitar will not stay in tune properly. After tuning each string, you need to literally pull it up and then left and right by grabbing it somewhere close to the 12th fret smile.gif At least, this is what works for me wink.gif


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Mertay
post Sep 26 2014, 08:08 PM
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I'm lazy, just 1 turn on Low E is enough in my case smile.gif but the B and High E needs some turn as they are very thin and more slippery than the wound strings.

If possible cut the extra string lenght right after you feel the tuning is stable cause if the turn isn't enough, that extra length gets added as you turn the tuners and all will be ok wink.gif


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klasaine
post Sep 27 2014, 04:19 PM
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No less than a full 3 wraps on the the high strings and no less than 2 on the low strings.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 27 2014, 07:36 PM
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Looks like everyone has their own approach here, but whatever you do, don't forget to stretch the strings smile.gif In that way, you'll make sure that your strings will stay in tune better wink.gif


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klasaine
post Sep 27 2014, 09:44 PM
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Yes, definitely stretch the strings.

* I hold a note down at the 1st fret when I stretch each string. I've cracked a nut before with over zealous stretching when I was in a hurry.


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Mith
post Sep 28 2014, 04:48 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Sep 28 2014, 04:44 AM) *
Yes, definitely stretch the strings.

* I hold a note down at the 1st fret when I stretch each string. I've cracked a nut before with over zealous stretching when I was in a hurry.


Hehehehe cracked a nut. One other thing i'd like to add that I found handy is if your using a locking nut like a floyd. Stretch the strings with the nut unlocked so all the string behind the nut is stretch as well.


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SirJamsalot
post Sep 28 2014, 06:53 AM
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This is how I do it, and is alot easier than winding first before poking through. string through first, then give about 3 finger widths slack and bend the string at the peg hole in the opposite direction you'll string it, then bend the other side slightly and wind away - jump to 1:20 - this guy is long-winded, but gets the point across well. this method works really well for the smallest string which I used to struggle with on ibanez style heads 6 in a row.



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Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 28 2014, 12:46 PM
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When I had the floyd, I usually placed the strings with the bullet in the headstock part so that they may keep a good counter grip on the strings when locked in the trem. Some folks cut the barrel, but I think it was there to help a lot. Anyway, changing strings on a floyd unit is a totally different matter, when calibrating and setting it up for a new pack of strings. I'm so glad I got rid of that laugh.gif


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bleez
post Sep 28 2014, 02:37 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Sep 28 2014, 12:46 PM) *
Anyway, changing strings on a floyd unit is a totally different matter, when calibrating and setting it up for a new pack of strings. I'm so glad I got rid of that laugh.gif

Hell yes, me too!
The very first time I done it I thought....... 'Nope, this is just not for me' mellow.gif

This post has been edited by bleez: Sep 28 2014, 02:38 PM


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klasaine
post Sep 28 2014, 03:40 PM
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QUOTE (Mith @ Sep 27 2014, 08:48 PM) *
Hehehehe cracked a nut.

And I use the 3 finger method ohmy.gif ... for slack measurement.




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AK Rich
post Sep 28 2014, 07:01 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Sep 28 2014, 03:46 AM) *
When I had the floyd, I usually placed the strings with the bullet in the headstock part so that they may keep a good counter grip on the strings when locked in the trem. Some folks cut the barrel, but I think it was there to help a lot. Anyway, changing strings on a floyd unit is a totally different matter, when calibrating and setting it up for a new pack of strings. I'm so glad I got rid of that laugh.gif


I put the strings on backwards and cut the ball ends off at the end of the process too, rather than cut them first and use that end at the trem side. Not really for the purpose of a counter grip, but because it is faster that way for me and I don't like to use the extra wrapped end of the string right before the ball ends in the string locks on the trem. I feel that the tension there could pull on those extra wraps and loosen, leading to issues of staying in tune. Just a theory, and I guess I could cut the strings above those extra wraps, but if I am in a hurry , I don't have to cut the strings at all. I could just give it a haircut later. smile.gif
If you are changing strings on a floyd or most other trem systems, there really isn't much difference from a hardtail in the process as long as you are using the same string gauge and block the trem flat and level before you change the strings. My trem block is premade to the correct size out of a piece of cedar shim stock after I have completed the original setup and kept in my guitar case. This makes the process almost as fast as changing strings on a hardtail. The only thing that makes it take slightly more time with a trem system is that you have to lock each string at the trem side. Of course it is a different matter if you are changing to strings of a different gauge, in which case you will need to adjust the spring tension of the trem. wink.gif
As far as wraps go at the pegs, I use the same rules as Ken, at least 2 wraps for the wound strings and at least 3 wraps for the unwound strings and then stretch the hell out of them before locking the nut.

This post has been edited by AK Rich: Sep 28 2014, 07:12 PM
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Todd Simpson
post Sep 28 2014, 07:30 PM
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I string backwards as well on my floyd guitars. I use the ball end through the grover tuner and it's handy as a stopper smile.gif Doesn't work on the RGT42 though as you have to thread through the trem.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 29 2014, 04:43 PM
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QUOTE (bleez @ Sep 28 2014, 01:37 PM) *
Hell yes, me too!
The very first time I done it I thought....... 'Nope, this is just not for me' mellow.gif


This is definitely one of the big reasons why I gave up Floyds smile.gif Plus, I don't use any of its features in my playing, so it's clearly not something that I need.



QUOTE (AK Rich @ Sep 28 2014, 06:01 PM) *
Of course it is a different matter if you are changing to strings of a different gauge, in which case you will need to adjust the spring tension of the trem. wink.gif


Well, I agree and no in the same time, if that's possible biggrin.gif The idea here is that, I've experienced a lot of times and situations in which the same gauge of strings has caused a de-balancing of the trem. Needless to say, I had to start tweaking it once again and so on. i thought about it over the years and maybe, just maybe, it was because of the different string brands, regardless of the similarity of the gauges?


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SirJamsalot
post Sep 29 2014, 05:16 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Sep 28 2014, 04:46 AM) *
When I had the floyd, I usually placed the strings with the bullet in the headstock part so that they may keep a good counter grip on the strings when locked in the trem. Some folks cut the barrel, but I think it was there to help a lot. Anyway, changing strings on a floyd unit is a totally different matter, when calibrating and setting it up for a new pack of strings. I'm so glad I got rid of that laugh.gif


I absolutely hate stringing guitars with wammys!, to the point that I no longer use them. Too much of a maintenance issue for me. smile.gif


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AK Rich
post Sep 29 2014, 05:59 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Sep 29 2014, 07:43 AM) *
Well, I agree and no in the same time, if that's possible biggrin.gif The idea here is that, I've experienced a lot of times and situations in which the same gauge of strings has caused a de-balancing of the trem. Needless to say, I had to start tweaking it once again and so on. i thought about it over the years and maybe, just maybe, it was because of the different string brands, regardless of the similarity of the gauges?

Yeah, I could see where that may be possible to have a bit different tension while changing brands of strings, and a floating bridge system is always going to need some tweaking over time. My biggest issue has probably been with sloppiness in the trem arm itself. I hate it when there is some play in the trem arm. but some plumbers tape on the threads usually fixes that for me. I have had no issues with different string tensions of the same gauge though , probably because I have been using the same brand and gauge for 20 years or more. biggrin.gif
I guess the bottom line is that a floating bridge such as a floyd system just isn't for everyone. smile.gif
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Todd Simpson
post Sep 30 2014, 01:51 AM
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Thats for sure!! Some folks HATE the floyd and floating setups. I've tightened my floyds up so they have very little "float" left. But I LOVE floyds smile.gif They do take some getting used to and I did struggle like every other noob on earth to get used to stringing and dealing with them. Some folks just skip it and get a hard tail.

I really like the fine tuners personally and the flat surface for muting. I despise trying to mute on other bridge systems. But that's just my .02 smile.gif I do a lot of muting and like a flat mute surface, I'm sure some folks love muting on LP or Fender bridges. smile.gif

QUOTE (AK Rich @ Sep 29 2014, 12:59 PM) *
Yeah, I could see where that may be possible to have a bit different tension while changing brands of strings, and a floating bridge system is always going to need some tweaking over time. My biggest issue has probably been with sloppiness in the trem arm itself. I hate it when there is some play in the trem arm. but some plumbers tape on the threads usually fixes that for me. I have had no issues with different string tensions of the same gauge though , probably because I have been using the same brand and gauge for 20 years or more. biggrin.gif
I guess the bottom line is that a floating bridge such as a floyd system just isn't for everyone. smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 30 2014, 01:07 PM
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I usually burned the plastic rings in the arm to make them swell and hold the arm in place biggrin.gif It's an old trick I learned from one of my former guitar teachers. You actually take a lighter and burn the rings for a second maybe 2 maximum and it will stick VERY firmly in the socket - I am of course talking about the arm type below:



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AK Rich
post Sep 30 2014, 04:33 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Sep 30 2014, 04:07 AM) *
I usually burned the plastic rings in the arm to make them swell and hold the arm in place biggrin.gif It's an old trick I learned from one of my former guitar teachers. You actually take a lighter and burn the rings for a second maybe 2 maximum and it will stick VERY firmly in the socket - I am of course talking about the arm type below:



Hey!, you CAN teach an old dog new tricks! I have not heard of that one before. Nice tip Cosmin! smile.gif
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