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> Chris S. Guitar Development Lab
Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 15 2014, 07:23 AM
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Hey buddy smile.gif Take your time with the triads until the shifting feels natural and as effortless as possible - you'll see it'll pay of big time on the long run wink.gif About the guitar setup, might be you have tweaked with the intonation without wanting to - I am not really knowledgeable with this stuff, as I have a luthier that takes care of my guitars. I have a saying - each person knows how to do something - let them do it and you focus on doing your own thing wink.gif So my best advice here would be:

- post this in the Gear section and maybe someone here who knows the problem can hint a solution
- if nothing comes along, go see a luthier - they know EXACTLY what to do smile.gif

About the new lesson, if you have enough time and if you like it, why not? It's a very fine choice and I would be delighted to see a video with your progress on the lesson wink.gif

Let's keep rocking!


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Chris S.
post Oct 15 2014, 08:28 PM
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I'm slowly getting better with my triads, here and there my fingers will be a little too close to the fret and it'll buzz or the fingers on my picking hand will make a mistake but overall it's slowly getting better!

Like I said I've also been practicing them as arpeggios and I came up with this little rhythm piece. It's pouring rain and the power went out on my whole street so I tried to use the triads to get a feel for that mood.

I came up with it quick and wanted to record it so I don't forget it, so it's not perfect (some minor mistakes and the timing is a bit off).
It's only a simple little piece but it excites me because before you started to help me I wouldn't have been able to even come up with something like it! biggrin.gif

I attached the file and was wondering what you're thoughts were? I can't wait until I can be like you and hum a melody in my head and be able to create a solo over it!

Thanks!! laugh.gif

EDIT: I know you have experience with baritones and I was wondering what the benefits are of having one? I found a baritone strat copy with 24 frets! From what I understand you can use lower tunings? Are there any other pros/cons?

This post has been edited by Chris S.: Oct 15 2014, 08:39 PM
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Attached File  Rain.mp3 ( 506.53K ) Number of downloads: 73
 
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 16 2014, 09:16 AM
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Hey mate! I am very glad to hear that you are slowly opening up biggrin.gif Just keep going and you'll get to discover amazing things about music and yourself as well wink.gif

The piece sounds very nice and it has a certain vintage feel - it really makes me think about rain, as it resembles one of those evergreen songs that I used to listen as a kid, when I was sad about not being close to a girl I really, really liked smile.gif Thank you for the memory!

Keep practicing with chords and arpeggios as well and you'll nail the lessons - let me know when you can show me a recording, ok?

About the baritone - yes indeed, I own and use a PRS SE Mike Mushok with my band and I must say it's an extraordinary instrument. Indeed, it is a guitar that was created for lower tunings without needing extra strings. I keep it tuned to drop A and more recently B standard with the thickest string dropped to G - that's how we recorded our single released earlier this year - Bloodstream.

The cons, if you may call them like that, are that you can't solo in standard tuning, as the tuning is different - this is a pro feature of the 7 or 8 string - you have low register and normal tuning all in one, but since we don't solo or use standard key for our music, the baritone is the perfect weapon smile.gif Please let me know if there's anything else I can help with in respect to this, ok?


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Chris S.
post Oct 16 2014, 06:31 PM
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Thanks for the kind words my friend! I wouldn't have expected something I made to trigger a memory, that's such an awesome feeling! biggrin.gif

My fingers get really cramped in the higher frets and that's where most of my mistakes are, along with my picking hand not striking each string or each triad with a consistent attack. Other than that it's basically the big changes from moving from the last triad from one set of strings to the first triad on the next set of strings.

I'm practicing at a slow 80bpm - I'm hoping I get it better by Monday or Tuesday so I can post a take because right now it's pretty sloppy tongue.gif
It seems a little bit easier when I use a pick that's cheating since the video lesson calls for finger picking rolleyes.gif

I'll keep you posted smile.gif

EDIT:

So you're not entirely in the dark I thought I would do a quick take, but silly me rendered the backing track at 100bpm instead of 80bpm but like I always say "When life gives you backing tracks 20bpm faster than what you're used to, you roll with it!" - Actually, I have never said that before tongue.gif



But yeah, I went with it so you can get an idea of where I am at. It needs a lot of work, but trust me when I say it's A LOT better than it was a few days ago!

Whenever I use a clean amp in POD Farm and record into Reaper the volume is so wimpy. I cranked the volume on the amp in POD Farm and I boosted the gain of the track in Reaper but as you can hear it's still really quiet.

If I keep boosting the gain the track is going to start getting all fuzzy and distorted, do you know of another way I can make it louder? I thought about boosting the gain of the amp but then the tone becomes overdriven instead of clean dry.gif

Thanks man!



This post has been edited by Chris S.: Oct 16 2014, 07:53 PM
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Chris S.
post Oct 17 2014, 05:52 AM
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Also,

I don't know if you saw my thread in the Gear section but my soul mate bought me a new axe!

Thought I'd do a little free-form blues improv:

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/freeform-blues-improv

I feel like if I write a little riff or lick once a day it'll help me in the long wrong with my songwriting?

biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Chris S.: Oct 17 2014, 05:55 AM
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 17 2014, 09:27 AM
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Hey buddy! Thank you for the video - it's clear that you are on the good path, but let's see how we can improve wink.gif Out of what I am noticing:

- timing could be improved in respect to landing the chords on the beat
- you need to relax your left hand in order to make the chord sound natural and for all the notes to be heard. Sometimes, you tend to push too hard on the string and that can be heard in the pitch of some notes smile.gif
- reduce the tempo when practicing, in order to manage to play in good timing, stay relaxed and land the chords with all the notes ringing out clean and clear

Do we have a deal, young man? biggrin.gif

About the volume - maybe it's the input level that needs to be raised - I am guessing here.. Todd knows a lot of stuff about Reaper, so I guess that the best thing would be to post a question on the matter in the Practice room.

QUOTE (Chris S. @ Oct 16 2014, 05:31 PM) *
Thanks for the kind words my friend! I wouldn't have expected something I made to trigger a memory, that's such an awesome feeling! biggrin.gif

My fingers get really cramped in the higher frets and that's where most of my mistakes are, along with my picking hand not striking each string or each triad with a consistent attack. Other than that it's basically the big changes from moving from the last triad from one set of strings to the first triad on the next set of strings.

I'm practicing at a slow 80bpm - I'm hoping I get it better by Monday or Tuesday so I can post a take because right now it's pretty sloppy tongue.gif
It seems a little bit easier when I use a pick that's cheating since the video lesson calls for finger picking rolleyes.gif

I'll keep you posted smile.gif

EDIT:

So you're not entirely in the dark I thought I would do a quick take, but silly me rendered the backing track at 100bpm instead of 80bpm but like I always say "When life gives you backing tracks 20bpm faster than what you're used to, you roll with it!" - Actually, I have never said that before tongue.gif



But yeah, I went with it so you can get an idea of where I am at. It needs a lot of work, but trust me when I say it's A LOT better than it was a few days ago!

Whenever I use a clean amp in POD Farm and record into Reaper the volume is so wimpy. I cranked the volume on the amp in POD Farm and I boosted the gain of the track in Reaper but as you can hear it's still really quiet.

If I keep boosting the gain the track is going to start getting all fuzzy and distorted, do you know of another way I can make it louder? I thought about boosting the gain of the amp but then the tone becomes overdriven instead of clean dry.gif

Thanks man!



QUOTE (Chris S. @ Oct 17 2014, 04:52 AM) *
Also,

I don't know if you saw my thread in the Gear section but my soul mate bought me a new axe!

Thought I'd do a little free-form blues improv:

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/freeform-blues-improv

I feel like if I write a little riff or lick once a day it'll help me in the long wrong with my songwriting?

biggrin.gif


Hey again mate - that's a very good idea and I totally support it wink.gif Now about this one - it has potential, but you need to take into account a few things:

- groove - there's no rhythm emanating from the playing - if you decide on playing with the guitar only, you need to play very groovy. Can you take this idea and establish a groove with it? By that, I mean, playing the lead ideas in a rhythmic fashion and then, once a groove stays in the mind of the listener, you can develop the lead further on smile.gif

- articulation - you need to bend and vibrate a bit smoother, but this is an aspect which we will develop together in our further musical endeavors wink.gif

Keep going with this!


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Chris S.
post Oct 17 2014, 05:49 PM
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QUOTE
- groove - there's no rhythm emanating from the playing - if you decide on playing with the guitar only, you need to play very groovy. Can you take this idea and establish a groove with it? By that, I mean, playing the lead ideas in a rhythmic fashion and then, once a groove stays in the mind of the listener, you can develop the lead further on


I'm a little confused in regards to groove sad.gif

So if it's guitar only do I make a rhythm guitar in my head and try to play a long - so that no one can hear the rhythm but me, but they can feel it through what I'm playing?

Do you know any examples on youtube or anything where it's just the lead guitar - so I can listen and get a better understanding?

QUOTE
- timing could be improved in respect to landing the chords on the beat
- you need to relax your left hand in order to make the chord sound natural and for all the notes to be heard. Sometimes, you tend to push too hard on the string and that can be heard in the pitch of some notes
- reduce the tempo when practicing, in order to manage to play in good timing, stay relaxed and land the chords with all the notes ringing out clean and clear


I will definitely focus on those aspects!

I agree, a lot of the triads that are an awkward positioning for my fingers I tend to really push down really hard causing some pitch issues. And slow and steady wins the race! So I will lower the tempo and work on landing the chords on the beat biggrin.gif

ALSO:

One more question about baritones: You said that you can still play a baritone in standard tuning, or would there be too much string tension?

I'm a hardcore strat guy but I hate how it's really awkward to play the higher frets, so when I saw the baritone that's 24 frets I know it would be a lot easier since the cutaways in the body are deeper.

It probably would be a waste to get a baritone and never play it in a lower tuning, though tongue.gif
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 18 2014, 02:08 PM
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QUOTE (Chris S. @ Oct 17 2014, 04:49 PM) *
So if it's guitar only do I make a rhythm guitar in my head and try to play a long - so that no one can hear the rhythm but me, but they can feel it through what I'm playing?


EXACTLY! Nailed it like a pro wink.gif A good example.... hmmm, lemme see - this theme, it's the first thing that popped to my mind smile.gif Once the groove was established, you can build a steady improv following the groove - that is usually done, by slowly modiffying the initial groove by adding and substracting notes, so that you may obtain something that retains the groove, has something of the original theme and is yet different wink.gif It's one technique!



Slow is the way to go - you should definitely aim for control here and not speed - so focus on nailing the changes and playing the positions as clean as possible and only then, speeding up towards the original speed and making sure you can keep the same relaxed spirit smile.gif

About the baritone - mate, a baritone is meant to be played low - I mean, there is no sense in having one if you want to keep it into a normal tuning wink.gif I for one, have never played anything else but band related stuff, which is pretty low - drop A or a hybrid between B standard and the thickest string detuned to G. But who knows what one can discover? I am not to one to bash anyone for using a certain instrument or device unconventionally, so let me know if you decide to get one anyway wink.gif


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Chris S.
post Oct 19 2014, 05:34 PM
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I had to work mandatory overtime this weekend so I was only able to practice about 20 minutes on Friday and Saturday mad.gif

But I'm back to 1 hour of practice each day again and can make up for the lost practice time on Tuesday and Wednesday when I'm off biggrin.gif

I slowed it back down to 80bpm and am working on getting everything clean. The new guitar my girlfriend bought me has slightly wider fret spacing than what I'm used to so I'm practicing on this guitar, my Strat and my LP copy which all have different style necks, neck joints and fret spacing - I don't want to just be able to play it on one guitar but any guitar I pick up cool.gif

EDIT: Also, I just saw your post in the Chill Out section from a few weeks ago about the photo shoot and upcoming goodness with PRS and I just wanted to say super congratulations!!!

Even with everything going on right now, the fact that you still take the time to come on and help all of us out means a whole lot! We couldn't do it without you, my friend biggrin.gif



This post has been edited by Chris S.: Oct 20 2014, 02:54 AM
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 20 2014, 11:51 AM
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Great approach, man! Like a pro! biggrin.gif And thank you for your kind thoughts - I am trying not to forget where I started and if I can help out, I am gladly doing it in the time that I can offer wink.gif

Keep rocking - umm errh, chording biggrin.gif and let me know how it goes, ok?


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Chris S.
post Oct 21 2014, 04:04 AM
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I've isolated the chord changes that are causing me problems and I'm going to spend the week improving them. When I feel confident with them I shall post a take at 80 bpm, and then if all is well I'll work on increasing the speed cool.gif

I've also been trying to work on my grooooooooveeee wink.gif

I came up with a little pentatonic riff that reminded me of a spy move like James Bond and I thought I would try to make it have some groove like you talked about:

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/spy-groove-snippet

Is this a better concept of groove?

Also,

I've really been trying to break down the triad lesson and take as much information from it as possible and I came across a question that I was hoping you could answer?

So all the triads in the lesson make up the C Major scale, and I made that little song on the rainy day that is in the key of C.

Now the chord progression goes C Am Dm G

My question is, if the progression starts with a different chord other than C, would it still be in the key of C?

Like if the progression was Am Dm Em G - all those triads are in the C Major scale but would you still be in the key of C and use the C Major scale or would it be in a different key and with a different scale?

Sorry if I didn't explain that well blink.gif

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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 21 2014, 10:18 AM
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Hey Chris!!

Definitely!! You made me nod my head biggrin.gif The first part is very groovy and well interpreted, but the second half of the theme could have a little bit more confidence - from 0:10 onward, you need to play that accentuated chords a bit more firmly, as it weakens up a bit.

But you, my friend, understood the concept smile.gif Good goin! Try to implement the idea of grooving with everything you create and it will only get better!

Please proceed as you stated with the lesson and when you feel like you are ready with the 80BPM take, show me a recording and we'll take it from there on smile.gif

I understood your question perfectly - and it is a very good one indeed! The idea here is that you stay in the same key for all the progressions you mentioned, but each progression can be related to a different mode, which can be derived from that specific key. For instance:

C Am Dm G is a major progression related to the Ionian mode - the C major scale while the Am Dm Em G is an A Aeolian mode or natural minor scale, if you want to call it like that. We need to delve into modal theory a bit, so that you may understand these ideas better. Having a good grasp on harmonizing the major scale with triads will allow you to juggle with modal progressions as well wink.gif

Have you read about harmonizing so far - I mean aside what the theoretical part of the lessons you are working on right now, mentioned?


QUOTE (Chris S. @ Oct 21 2014, 03:04 AM) *
I've isolated the chord changes that are causing me problems and I'm going to spend the week improving them. When I feel confident with them I shall post a take at 80 bpm, and then if all is well I'll work on increasing the speed cool.gif

I've also been trying to work on my grooooooooveeee wink.gif

I came up with a little pentatonic riff that reminded me of a spy move like James Bond and I thought I would try to make it have some groove like you talked about:

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/spy-groove-snippet

Is this a better concept of groove?

Also,

I've really been trying to break down the triad lesson and take as much information from it as possible and I came across a question that I was hoping you could answer?

So all the triads in the lesson make up the C Major scale, and I made that little song on the rainy day that is in the key of C.

Now the chord progression goes C Am Dm G

My question is, if the progression starts with a different chord other than C, would it still be in the key of C?

Like if the progression was Am Dm Em G - all those triads are in the C Major scale but would you still be in the key of C and use the C Major scale or would it be in a different key and with a different scale?

Sorry if I didn't explain that well blink.gif



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Chris S.
post Oct 21 2014, 07:55 PM
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Thanks Cosmin!

I feel like I'm starting to understand groove a little better but with slower more emotional songs I don't really know how to develop or feel the groove.

For example, that little spy riff sounds upbeat, it's a little on the fast side so I can nod my head and feel the groove kind of like a song that you would dance to.

However, I listened to your Sad Theme in G Minor (which is an absolutely fantastic song by the way, I can only hope to write something half as good as that one day) and since it's not a fast or upbeat song I can't really determine the groove.

Do you have any advice how to feel a groove on a slower emotional song such as the one you wrote?

Also:

I know what harmonies sound like, I love that sound like Iron Maiden and Avenged Sevenfold, but I don't actually know how to harmonize or anything.

But I did pick up this at my local bookstore today - and it even has a PRS on the cover wink.gif (at least I think it is one):



Part two seems to talk about what you mentioned:

Part II:

-Harmonzing the Major Scale to Form Triads and Chords
-Forming Chord Shapes with the CAGED System
-Adding Chord Tones and Extensions to Chords

Part III goes to talk about modes but I think I'm going to tackle Part II first. cool.gif

So I'm going to be a little bookworm and do some reading and see if I can get a better grasp of the concepts you talked about and let you know how it goes laugh.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 22 2014, 08:19 AM
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Hey lil' buddy! biggrin.gif It is indeed a PRS - those bird inlays are unmistakeable wink.gif

So let's take things one at a time - first things first, thank you for your kind thoughts on my composition - it has a very deep meaning for me. One thing that you need to know, is that emotional music needs to have a real basis. I mean, whenever I manage to put my feelings into music, I get something genuinely true and beautiful. But that doesn't occur easily and it doesn't come to me everyday. It hurts most of the times, because somehow, it seems that the best songs I have written so far are pretty darn sad and it has to hurt in order for something worthy of recording to come out smile.gif But hey, that's what happens in my case - it doesn't have to be the same with everyone.

In order to feel the groove, you need to be able to have a good grasp on rhythmic subdivisions and on groove in general. It's something that comes with experience and in order to get more and more into it, we can work on similar pieces found in GMC lessons and then, based on what you have learned and synthesized out of them, you will be able to build your own ideas. I also have this little trick here: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=41914

If you are able to play ANYTHING using those backing tracks in there, you will become the master of rhythm and groove smile.gif Read through a bit and let me know what you think about the backing tracks wink.gif

Regarding the book - it can help of course - we have all those concepts written in the Theory section here in the forum so let me know if everything is easy to understand from the book and based on your newly acquired knowledge, we will add some more and develop things.

Let the questions pour! smile.gif


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Chris S.
post Oct 22 2014, 08:08 PM
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Taking bars out of backing tracks at random times, YOU MONSTER!!! laugh.gif

I love the concept actually, but my problem is that I can keep time pretty well if its consistent note values - like all triplets, all quarter notes, all 8 notes and so on - but to actually solo over a backing track where all the notes are different values plus there is rests, I goof up a lot sad.gif

So far, I'm reading through part one of the book because it focuses on learning where all the notes are. I've been trying to just memorize where every single note is but the book says a great way to do it is learn all the natural notes on the 5th and 6th string and with that you can use the octaves to find out where those notes are on the rest of the fretboard, and if you need a sharp or flat it's only a semitone away. I've been applying these concepts and it's going by pretty slow but I know it will come with time.

Also:

I've been practicing my butt off with the triad lesson and I thought I would surprise you with another take at 120bpm instead of 80bpm!

I've been playing along to the original video, but the backing track by itself is a little hard for me to follow along with because I'm used to drum beats that are simple like 1 , 2, 3, 4 kind of like a metronome so this is very different for me but overall I feel like I have come a long way since my last take - what do you think?

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/major-tr...120bpm-take-two

I was playing at 80bpm and was getting so bored so I started playing the piece in quarter notes instead of half notes and challenged myself to work through it and I feel like it has helped me improve my changes since the last take.

Stay sharp, my friend!

P.S. I'll be waiting for the PRS Awesome Sauce 3000 - the name of your signature guitar that PRS better make tongue.gif cool.gif
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 23 2014, 10:45 AM
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Hehehe biggrin.gif Well, if you are able to play anything you learn - be it rhythm or lead oriented, against those tracks, you will be a hell of a timing machine wink.gif Try it from time to time and you'll be amazed by how your abilities will grow smile.gif

It is important to start with consistent values and then slowly diversify, until you are confident in playing more loose and complex forms, such as a slow ballad phrase for instance. Playing slow is as difficult as playing fast smile.gif But if you learn how to play slow, you will have a far easier time learning how to play fast. We'll talk about various concepts and ideas, as they pop up in the lessons anyway, so as I said, the more questions you ask, the more you will understand and know smile.gif

Learning the notes on the neck would be far easier if you reduce your instrument as if it were a one string guitar and learning the notes on that one string musically - for instance - please check out this post in the link below:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...st&p=671081

Use the backing track and on each chord change - the progression in the track is Cmajor, Aminor, Fmajor,Gmajor, play the root of each chord on just the high E string. Then the thirds and then the 5ths smile.gif The idea here is to say the names of the notes out loud as you play them smile.gif

Once you are comfy with doing this on the E string, get to the B string and so on. The final result? You will know where the C, A, F, G, E, B and D notes are on the entire neck wink.gif You will learn it in an organic manner and what's more you will become able to associate a sound, a name and a position, for each note, in respect to where it will be played.

About the take - your chords sound a lot better, but there's a slight delay when you change the position - I mean you are not dead on the beat - maybe slowing things down to 100 BPM and focusing on the exact shits, would be a good step right now, so that you will make the lesson get as close to perfection as possible smile.gif

What do you think?

QUOTE (Chris S. @ Oct 22 2014, 07:08 PM) *
Taking bars out of backing tracks at random times, YOU MONSTER!!! laugh.gif

I love the concept actually, but my problem is that I can keep time pretty well if its consistent note values - like all triplets, all quarter notes, all 8 notes and so on - but to actually solo over a backing track where all the notes are different values plus there is rests, I goof up a lot sad.gif

So far, I'm reading through part one of the book because it focuses on learning where all the notes are. I've been trying to just memorize where every single note is but the book says a great way to do it is learn all the natural notes on the 5th and 6th string and with that you can use the octaves to find out where those notes are on the rest of the fretboard, and if you need a sharp or flat it's only a semitone away. I've been applying these concepts and it's going by pretty slow but I know it will come with time.

Also:

I've been practicing my butt off with the triad lesson and I thought I would surprise you with another take at 120bpm instead of 80bpm!

I've been playing along to the original video, but the backing track by itself is a little hard for me to follow along with because I'm used to drum beats that are simple like 1 , 2, 3, 4 kind of like a metronome so this is very different for me but overall I feel like I have come a long way since my last take - what do you think?

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/major-tr...120bpm-take-two

I was playing at 80bpm and was getting so bored so I started playing the piece in quarter notes instead of half notes and challenged myself to work through it and I feel like it has helped me improve my changes since the last take.

Stay sharp, my friend!

P.S. I'll be waiting for the PRS Awesome Sauce 3000 - the name of your signature guitar that PRS better make tongue.gif cool.gif



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Chris S.
post Oct 23 2014, 06:10 PM
Post #37


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QUOTE
Learning the notes on the neck would be far easier if you reduce your instrument as if it were a one string guitar and learning the notes on that one string musically - for instance - please check out this post in the link below:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...st&p=671081

Use the backing track and on each chord change - the progression in the track is Cmajor, Aminor, Fmajor,Gmajor, play the root of each chord on just the high E string. Then the thirds and then the 5ths smile.gif The idea here is to say the names of the notes out loud as you play them


Thanks Cosmin! This definitely seems like a more interesting approach - you should have been the one to write this book wink.gif

QUOTE
About the take - your chords sound a lot better, but there's a slight delay when you change the position - I mean you are not dead on the beat - maybe slowing things down to 100 BPM and focusing on the exact shits, would be a good step right now, so that you will make the lesson get as close to perfection as possible


So basically I have like an 8th rest at the end of each chord which is me changing from chord to chord and I should focus on making the changes happening instantly, correct?

Also:

Todd made me a thread on his board which is open to anyone, it's going to focus on improving my mixing/recording/editing skills.

With you as my guitar teacher and Todd as my mixing mentor I WILL BE UNSTOPPABLE!!! laugh.gif

(I should lay off the caffeine) tongue.gif

EDIT:

So I was thinking of a little snippet to record for Todd so he can get the full picture of how horrible I am at mixing tongue.gif

Anyhoo, I wrote a little lick a few years ago when the Haiti disaster happened and I haven't touched it until now so I decided I was going to make something out of it:

https://soundcloud.com/stortzmusic/hear-our-cries-snippet

I'm a little proud of myself for actually coming up with something halfway close to being halfway decent tongue.gif

Although I admit that I do not know the names of the chords I used and I don't know scales therefor I don't even know what scale I am using and I'm sure the chords don't match the scale and would have to be adjusted to fit the scale...

Yeah, that's how bad my theory is dry.gif

This post has been edited by Chris S.: Oct 24 2014, 04:52 AM
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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 24 2014, 09:05 AM
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Hey Chris!

Thanks again for your kind words, man smile.gif It's not really an 8th there, it's a bit less than that, but it's not on the beat and that's what you should be focusing on - getting it on the beat wink.gif

Hehe, I like the piece, but you should pay attention on a few aspects:

- bending - always strive to reach the correct pitches
- vibrato - play it wider and more rounded

We will get to articulation - bending and vibrato that is - so no worries wink.gif About the chords and notes used. Now that you have learned how chords are built and derived - can you apply the knowledge in your own piece?

- what notes make up each chord?
- what notes are you playing in the solo?

Let's see this and I will tell you how to establish the key once you know the answers to the questions above!

Congrats on working with Todd, mate! He is VERY knowledgeable and he will teach you a lot of important stuff!


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Chris S.
post Oct 25 2014, 04:36 AM
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QUOTE
Hehe, I like the piece, but you should pay attention on a few aspects:

- bending - always strive to reach the correct pitches
- vibrato - play it wider and more rounded


Thanks!

I understand that "wider" means I should be bending the string to get a higher pitch with the vibrato but what do you mean by "more rounded" ? Slower?

Didn't realize how bad my vibrato was until you started to help me out - and here I thought I've been doing it right all these years dry.gif tongue.gif

QUOTE
- what notes make up each chord?


Well there are 3 chords and then I add an extra note to two of them:

CODE
E|-----|--------|--2--3--|
B|--3--|--2--3--|--3-----|
G|--4--|--2-----|--2-----|
D|--4--|--2-----|--0-----|
A|--2--|--0-----|--------|
E|-----|--------|--------|


So I know that the root of the first chord is a B note (so it must be some sort of B chord?) and the other notes would be F#, another B but an octave up and finally a D.

The second chord I know is an A chord because it's one of the few open chords I know:

A E A (one octave higher) and C# but then I hammer on the C# to a D and then I don't know what it becomes.

And finally the last chord is a basic open D chord:

D A D (one octave higher) and F# but then I play the same chord with the F# being a G instead and I don't know what the chord becomes.

So all together:
CODE
E|-----|--------|--F#-G--|
B|--D--|--C#-D--|--D-----|
G|--B--|--A-----|--A-----|
D|--F#-|--E-----|--D-----|
A|--B--|--A-----|--------|
E|-----|--------|--------|


QUOTE
-what notes are you playing in the solo?


A B C# D E F#

So now that I have actually figured out all notes from the chords and scales they match! So does this mean they do work well with each other?

It took me a while to figure the notes out but the fact that I even did shows that I'm already getting better!

So now that we figured the notes out, how do I know the names of the chords I made (other than the ones I know) and what scale?

Thanks boss man! cool.gif

And on a lighter note:




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Chris S.
post Oct 26 2014, 01:01 PM
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So to me it sounded kind of a sad song so I assumed minor, looked up the formula and tried to see from which root the pattern would fit but it didn't and that's because I figured it out to be major!

First I threw in the G from the one chord to give me 7 notes:

A B C# D E F# G

And starting from D the WWHWWWH fits so the scale would be D Major!

I was reading the internet and someone said that 99% of the time the key is in the chord you resolve on: in this case the last chord is some sort of D - is this usually the case since the last chord is some sort of D and the scale worked out to be D major?

EDIT:

The chord part I'm still having some trouble with:

D E F# G A B C#
I II III IV V VI VII

So that's the scale and intervals

I've been kind of looking at my triads the wrong way. After reading more about triads it goes by the distance and not whether or not they are natural or sharp/flat (which is what I thought determined it).

So looking at it now:

I = B the root
III = D which is a step and a half therefor a minor third
V = F# and is two steps therefor not flatted

I bIII V = minor therefor it's a B minor chord

Am I on the right track?

The A chord I'm confused with because it's I III and a flat 5th and I don't know what kind of triad that forms.

And when I add the extra note in you get A D E and D is 2 1/2 steps from A and E is only 1 step from D

Now I'm starting to get confused sad.gif

This post has been edited by Chris S.: Oct 26 2014, 09:07 PM
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