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> 2014 Is First Year Ever With Zero Platinum-certified Records
Mertay
post Oct 23 2014, 10:36 AM
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http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/229695/201...tified-records/

While there were certainly a number of great albums you need to have from this year, 2014 will mark the first year since its inception in 1976 that no artist’s album will be certified as platinum from sales. The award is given by the RIAA to mark one million units sold, and with only a few weeks remaining in the year, no album is even remotely close to making the threshold.

The two records nearest the magic number are Beyonce’s self-titled album and Lorde’s “Pure Heroine,” but neither have even crossed the 800,000 mark, with sales of both having tapered off months ago. There is one caveat, and that is the fact that the soundtrack to the animated film Frozen has moved well over three million units; but it being a soundtrack and not a single-artist release places it into a slightly different category.

Yet the year is not a complete wash, as 60 individual songs have been certified as platinum, and this is a clear reflection of the overall shift that the industry has made back to a singles-based focus. Thanks to digital downloads, buyers are no longer required to purchase an entire album, but when compared to last year, the number of platinum-certified singles is still down more than 20%.

The remainder of 2014 is rather bleak in terms of world-wide artists that could move massive units in a short time, as the only possible shot will come from Foo Fighters’ “Sonic Highways;” but it’s been nearly a decade since that band achieved such commercial sales success. Given that reality, it’s safe to say that in nearly every aspect, 2014 will mark the most disappointing and dismal year ever in terms of mainstream music sales.

Many will be quick to blame the rise of streaming music services, as a large number of industry executives claim that this discourages the purchase of full albums and even singles to an extent. In fact, this was what many blamed for 2014 marking the lowest album sales since SoundScan tracking began in 1991 just a few weeks ago. When these numbers were released, it was the first solid indication of how uninspiring mainstream releases have been throughout this year, as those two previously mentioned albums that are closest to platinum status were both released in 2013.

As the traditional music model changes more and more, the industry must get out of the mud and admit they have to make massive adjustments in their sales approach if they wish to survive. With the reality that songs can get millions of streams and video views, yet only sell tens of thousands of copies, the old model is no longer relevant, and when the big labels collapse, they’ll only have their arrogance and ignorance to blame.


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klasaine
post Oct 23 2014, 03:46 PM
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QUOTE (Mertay @ Oct 23 2014, 02:36 AM) *
it was the first solid indication of how uninspiring mainstream releases have been throughout this year


The real question is, "why does mainstream music suck so much that nobody wants to buy it?"

This post has been edited by klasaine: Oct 23 2014, 03:47 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 23 2014, 06:34 PM
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Mainstream music sucks SOOOOOO bad that it's barely worth stealing!! Much less paying for!!! Just ask the average consumer smile.gif

QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 23 2014, 10:46 AM) *
The real question is, "why does mainstream music suck so much that nobody wants to buy it?"


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klasaine
post Oct 23 2014, 07:06 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Oct 23 2014, 10:34 AM) *
Mainstream music sucks SOOOOOO bad that it's barely worth stealing!! Much less paying for!!! Just ask the average consumer smile.gif


In general I agree.
But why? It used to not suck so much.


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SirJamsalot
post Oct 23 2014, 08:13 PM
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Yah, but it's only October, ... once my new album comes out, this will be a non-story.


hahahaha.

just kidding.


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 23 2014, 08:32 PM
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True!! The general level of "suck" seems vastly increased. The economics of the current system seem to have forced it in to more of a Japanese style "Music Biz" which is very very very top heavy, more so than in previous decades, with very little artist development and lots of prepackaged crap.

As the pile of money from CD's keeps shrinking, the labels take fewer and fewer chances it seems and giving up on cultivating talent. Thus the perpetuation of suckage.

"Good" music seems to come from outside the Label system these days, though there are certainly wads of exceptions, but without those, it wouldn't be a rule smile.gif


QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 23 2014, 02:06 PM) *
In general I agree.
But why? It used to not suck so much.


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SirJamsalot
post Oct 23 2014, 08:59 PM
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do people even buy albums anymore? I typically pick and choose singles that appeal to me. sometimes they all do which amounts to an album (Opeth, case in point).


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Kristofer Dahl
post Oct 23 2014, 09:15 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 23 2014, 08:06 PM) *
In general I agree.
But why? It used to not suck so much.

Are you saying 'things were better in the past' ph34r.gif

If I were to agree with you (which I am not sure I do! ) then maybe it's because mainstream labels seem to prioritize sound/image before strong songs. Sometimes a song will require a few listens before hooking the listener, whereas a completely new sound or image can strike instantaneously.

So an artist who 'only' has strong songs could be a risky investment for short term profit.


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klasaine
post Oct 24 2014, 02:44 AM
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I'm not saying anything.
I just posed a question.

I don't think it's a radical statement to say that 'mainstream' or easily accessible music is at one of it's lowest points in history.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Oct 24 2014, 03:22 AM


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Todd Simpson
post Nov 5 2014, 02:17 AM
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The economics of the biz have shifted things a bit towards crap it seems smile.gif There used to be more money and more chances taken smile.gif

QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 23 2014, 09:44 PM) *
I'm not saying anything.
I just posed a question.

I don't think it's a radical statement to say that 'mainstream' or easily accessible music is at one of it's lowest points in history.



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klasaine
post Nov 8 2014, 07:37 PM
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Technically it's not true.
Frozen 'soundtrack' has sold more than a million (god help us all) ... and as of last week, Taylor Swift's 1989 has sold 1.287 million (say's Billboard) with another projected 400,000.
I don't know when soundscan makes that all official.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Nov 8 2014, 07:37 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Nov 10 2014, 07:27 PM
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Good points!!! Also a great snapshot of the market itself. Notice both titles here, they appeal to the one demographic that stats show is still interested in buying physical media on a large scale. Yup!! TWEEN GIRLS. So if you make music that appeals to them, your in good shape smile.gif

OF course NOT ONLY teen girls buy/bought/will buy/continue to buy/ever have bought/etc. these titles and titles similar but not mentioned, and there are of course wads of exceptions that help make rules in to rules. Still. The data available shows a solid trend towards tween gals being one of the last demo groups still buying music on "value added plastic" E.g. CD.



QUOTE (klasaine @ Nov 8 2014, 02:37 PM) *
Technically it's not true.
Frozen 'soundtrack' has sold more than a million (god help us all) ... and as of last week, Taylor Swift's 1989 has sold 1.287 million (say's Billboard) with another projected 400,000.
I don't know when soundscan makes that all official.


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