Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Small Personal Studio
Mith
post Oct 24 2014, 09:03 AM
Post #1


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



Me and my housemate (both musicians) are thinking of building a large shed or structure on our property and making a small studio. Not for profit but basically a large jam room that sounds somewhat decent and a small tracking room so we can do some simple recording of our music. Has anyone ever approached a project like this. we both renovate and sell houses but its more of if we make something like this we would like to do it properly.

So does anyone have and resources for this kind of thing or attempted it themselves?


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 24 2014, 10:10 AM
Post #2


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



Hey bro! Best of luck with that smile.gif I think that Sir Jamsalot here at GMC and tonymiro should be the ones most eligible on helping out with this - so I'd write them a PM, just to make sure they don't miss the thread wink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Oct 24 2014, 11:24 AM
Post #3


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



Thanks Cos


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SirJamsalot
post Oct 24 2014, 07:03 PM
Post #4


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.226
Joined: 4-May 10
From: Bay Area, California
Member No.: 10.312



check out this thread
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=50684


--------------------
The more I practice, the more I wish I had time to practice!
My Band Forum: http://passionfly.site/chat

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Oct 24 2014, 07:53 PM
Post #5


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.849
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



The short answer is - you build an insulated room within a room, no windows, double doors that open in and out, treat the corners.

There's (relatively) sound proof drywall and adhesive called quiet rock ... http://www.quietrock.com/
A lot of studios have used this adhesive too ... http://www.greengluecompany.com/

http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=2
http://recordinginstitute.com/R2KREQ/cottage.htm
http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-your...-11-easy-steps/


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 24 2014, 08:48 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.760
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



I've been part of a project like that and it seems to be about 10 times the initial estimated cost somehow. sad.gif The more stuff you can get prebuilt, premade, donated, etc. the better smile.gif

One option is to buy an older RV (recreational vehicle) even if the engine and transmision are shot, you still have an enclosed space prewired for electric with it's own bathroom. If you get one where the engine and transmission works, you can actually travel in it and record where ever you like and gig/tour with it smile.gif


QUOTE (Mith @ Oct 24 2014, 04:03 AM) *
Me and my housemate (both musicians) are thinking of building a large shed or structure on our property and making a small studio. Not for profit but basically a large jam room that sounds somewhat decent and a small tracking room so we can do some simple recording of our music. Has anyone ever approached a project like this. we both renovate and sell houses but its more of if we make something like this we would like to do it properly.

So does anyone have and resources for this kind of thing or attempted it themselves?



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SirJamsalot
post Oct 24 2014, 09:34 PM
Post #7


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.226
Joined: 4-May 10
From: Bay Area, California
Member No.: 10.312



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Oct 24 2014, 12:48 PM) *
I've been part of a project like that and it seems to be about 10 times the initial estimated cost somehow. sad.gif The more stuff you can get prebuilt, premade, donated, etc. the better smile.gif

One option is to buy an older RV (recreational vehicle) even if the engine and transmision are shot, you still have an enclosed space prewired for electric with it's own bathroom. If you get one where the engine and transmission works, you can actually travel in it and record where ever you like and gig/tour with it smile.gif


The breaking bad recording studio - we deliver... haha.


--------------------
The more I practice, the more I wish I had time to practice!
My Band Forum: http://passionfly.site/chat

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Oct 24 2014, 09:55 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.849
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Oct 24 2014, 12:48 PM) *
One option is to buy an older RV (recreational vehicle) even if the engine and transmision are shot, you still have an enclosed space prewired for electric with it's own bathroom. If you get one where the engine and transmission works, you can actually travel in it and record where ever you like and gig/tour with it smile.gif


This is a great idea!
And yeah, the home studio (even a modest endeavor) can get pricey. But the fact that you're in home remodeling/renovation means you potentially have access to deals on materials(?)


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Oct 25 2014, 12:48 AM
Post #9


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



Yeah. The real thing is picking a structure. Probably looking at building a large shed and building 2 rooms inside that and then treat it all. Basically looking at a large jam space with room too record a bit and maybe work on making it sound great and maybe track some drums. Sure its not a cheap project But its also not one that needs to be done in any rush since we already use the spare room in the house but with my recording equipment, large drumkit, my guitars, the 2nd kit the space closes up pretty quick


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 25 2014, 02:40 AM
Post #10


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.760
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Now your talking!!!! smile.gif


QUOTE (SirJamsalot @ Oct 24 2014, 04:34 PM) *
The breaking bad recording studio - we deliver... haha.



Building a large shed is fairly easy smile.gif Building a large shed that "sounds great" is nearly impossible without spending some serious cash. Large sheds, sadly, are not designed to sound great. They are designed, generally to be sheds. ;( You could use one as a practice space sure! Converting a shed to a great sounding recording space is another matter. You can record anywhere. But getting a great sounding space is simply put, a lot of work, a lot of money and a lot of effort. Perhaps just making a place to practice, and putting up some mics to get functional recordings for quick demo work, capturing ideas, is more feasible?

QUOTE (Mith @ Oct 24 2014, 07:48 PM) *
Yeah. The real thing is picking a structure. Probably looking at building a large shed and building 2 rooms inside that and then treat it all. Basically looking at a large jam space with room too record a bit and maybe work on making it sound great and maybe track some drums. Sure its not a cheap project But its also not one that needs to be done in any rush since we already use the spare room in the house but with my recording equipment, large drumkit, my guitars, the 2nd kit the space closes up pretty quick



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Saoirse O'Shea
post Oct 25 2014, 09:18 AM
Post #11


Moderator - low level high stakes
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 6.173
Joined: 27-June 07
From: Espania - Cadiz province
Member No.: 2.194



I've done various builds and helped/advised others over the years. Christian (who has already posted here) also has hands on experieince of a studio build.

As has already been said what you essentially are creating is a room within a room. Some of the things you need to consider before you start are:

The purpose of each room - the sound treatment of a recording/tracking room is not the same as a mixing room or a mastering room.
Room size and position of each room.
Facilities - electricty and mains outlets, air conditioning (if any), lighting, water, heating, bathroom, etc.
Extra rooms including machine room and storage.
Local laws on noise and nussance that may affect how you sound insulate to minimise sound leaving out of the building beyond your perimeter.
Where the building is situated and hhow it is affected by noise and vibrations (this may not be a big issue for a home/project build unless of course you're right next door to a motorway/railway line/noisy factory...)
How the internal room interact - position of doors, windows and corridors, sound treatment between rooms to minimise leakage.

DIY is considerably cheaper if you have the skills to do the work. Some of the work is quite specialised but if you have good DIY skills there is plenty of info on the internet so doing this to make a good home/project space is certainly doable.


--------------------
Get your music professionally mastered by anl AES registered Mastering Engineer. Contact me for Audio Mastering Services and Advice and visit our website www.miromastering.com

Be friends on facebook with us here.

We use professional, mastering grade hardware in our mastering studo. Our hardware includes:
Cranesong Avocet II Monitor Controller, Dangerous Music Liasion Insert Hardware Router, ATC SCM Pro Monitors, Lavry Black DA11, Prism Orpheus ADC/DAC, Gyratec Gyraf XIV Parallel Passive Mastering EQ, Great River MAQ 2NV Mastering EQ, Kush Clariphonic Parallel EQ Shelf, Maselec MLA-2 Mastering Compressor, API 2500 Mastering Compressor, Eventide Eclipse Reverb/Echo.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Oct 25 2014, 10:37 AM
Post #12


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



Yeah, Was probably going to be a brick shed I think. Probably make it as a double garage so if we sell the place it can be of some use

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Oct 25 2014, 09:40 AM) *
Now your talking!!!! smile.gif





Building a large shed is fairly easy smile.gif Building a large shed that "sounds great" is nearly impossible without spending some serious cash. Large sheds, sadly, are not designed to sound great. They are designed, generally to be sheds. ;( You could use one as a practice space sure! Converting a shed to a great sounding recording space is another matter. You can record anywhere. But getting a great sounding space is simply put, a lot of work, a lot of money and a lot of effort. Perhaps just making a place to practice, and putting up some mics to get functional recordings for quick demo work, capturing ideas, is more feasible?



--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Oct 25 2014, 04:11 PM
Post #13


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.849
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



Since you're in no hurry and you don't (at least initially) have any desire to make it a commercial venture, you can build the structure and use it as a 'jam' room while you're slowly (and carefully) figuring out what else you want/need to do with it.

My own personal experience in my practice/jam room:
Isolate the electrical (and ground/earth it). Run at least four AC inputs on every wall.

Mine's evolving slowly.
It was originally a garage with a very small apartment attached. There is a WC - which is convenient.
Attached Image
Attached Image

This post has been edited by klasaine: Oct 25 2014, 04:30 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Oct 25 2014, 04:34 PM
Post #14


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



Man that looks nice. during the day I was thinking of maybe even seeing how much a small granny flat will cost. We have our jam room in the house so there is no rush, this is more of something we were thinking about the other day while sitting on the patio. The main think I'm looking for really is one room big enough to be a control room and another room to be big enough to have a decent size band in and not be cramped.


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Oct 25 2014, 05:04 PM
Post #15


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.849
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



There's also a proper 'garage' to the right of those pics that I'm using for gear storage, bike storage, an area for my kid to paint, etc ... eventually it will be a bigger music playing area.

Attached Image
Attached Image

The good thing about it is that the guy who's place it was before me had a shop in there. So there's a bunch of AC inputs which is very convenient. Plenty of room for a band to play and my neighbors don't seem to mind(?).

*I have recorded in the area in the photos of post #13. Just close mic'd guitar overdubs. It sounds fine.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Oct 25 2014, 05:05 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SirJamsalot
post Nov 12 2014, 01:49 AM
Post #16


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.226
Joined: 4-May 10
From: Bay Area, California
Member No.: 10.312



In regard to Klasaine's advice on power - more is always better. Consider a power conditioner in your circuit, or at least mount one on your wall next to your outlets for your recording equipment - and P/A system. Neighbors suck the same lines, and no telling when they're gonna fire up a whirly gig that sends a hum through your lines =smile.gif

Also, older buildings used a 2 wire circuit. If you find you don't have a ground wire, invest in a copper rod to drive down, and run a grounding wire for your computer equipment. It will protect you better, and potentially help with line noise.

A garage is far better than building a shed - sheds typcially don't have insulation, so the weather will either freeze you or burn you (gear included), let alone be noisy inside and out.

Go gettem!

QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 25 2014, 08:11 AM) *
Since you're in no hurry and you don't (at least initially) have any desire to make it a commercial venture, you can build the structure and use it as a 'jam' room while you're slowly (and carefully) figuring out what else you want/need to do with it.

My own personal experience in my practice/jam room:
Isolate the electrical (and ground/earth it). Run at least four AC inputs on every wall.

Mine's evolving slowly.
It was originally a garage with a very small apartment attached. There is a WC - which is convenient.
Attached Image
Attached Image



--------------------
The more I practice, the more I wish I had time to practice!
My Band Forum: http://passionfly.site/chat

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Nov 12 2014, 05:30 AM
Post #17


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.760
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Here is a very spiff vid about some pretty critical info to consider when building your studio. It's a LOOOOOOONG vid at about an hour but worth a watch smile.gif




Here is a GREAT vid about "Studio Monitors". Pretty much every question that I get about monitors summed up in one vid smile.gif



This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Nov 12 2014, 05:33 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mith
post Nov 20 2014, 03:36 AM
Post #18


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 428
Joined: 19-May 14
From: Australia
Member No.: 19.821



That 2nd Vid is just down the road from my place .... they are way over priced lol

At the moment the studio is taking up the back burner and the workshop is the priority at the moment


--------------------
I don't suffer from insanity, I love every minute of it
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 26th July 2017 - 01:41 PM