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> Writing Instrumental Guitar Music, Let's Share Pointers
Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 14 2014, 10:51 AM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Nov 13 2014, 08:52 PM) *
Maybe it feels easier with vocal songs because you hand over the responsibility of building the - ever so important - lead melodies to someone else..? tongue.gif


Kris, in my case, it's pretty different, as I am the one responsible with both guitar work and vocal work - I share some of the vocal creation duties with one of my band mates, but since it's my voice, it's pretty tough to leave this in other hands.

I pretty much came to know where my vocal abilities and comfort zone are and when I am writing, I relate to that, while occasionally I am trying to push my limits with some new forms of vocal expression, plus since this summer I began expermenting with fry screaming in live contexts - it came out pretty well most of the times, but I still don't feel like I can pull it off top notch at command. The big problem is that I don't feel ok doing it at home without all that pump that surrounds me while I am onstage.

The good part though, is that I am becoming more and more used to singing and playing onstage and making things look and feel natural. It's a whole different experience and the monitoring aspect is pretty important, due to the fact that we perform with three guitars live and the in-ear monitor sum has to be very well put together, in order not to mess things up.

I don't know about you guys but I came to the conclusion that stage monitoring is a crucial aspect for great performance!


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SirJamsalot
post Nov 14 2014, 08:05 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Nov 14 2014, 02:51 AM) *
snip* - I don't know about you guys but I came to the conclusion that stage monitoring is a crucial aspect for great performance!


As Steve Vai says - you gotta get to that other place. It's difficult to get there if you can't get into your own music on stage, which means you need a good mix to listen to.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 15 2014, 06:49 PM
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Sweet Jesus.. we didn't go there with out normal sound engineer - guess what, this dude forgot to send my guitar in the in-ear monitor biggrin.gif

I had to play the whole gig without hearing anything from my guitar wink.gif But back to the topic - what do you guys think, what's the most catchy guitar theme/solo, in your opinion and why? What makes it catchy? I will choose one that came in this moment - Steve Vai's intro theme from 'Tender Surrender' - it's made out of octaves completely smile.gif The theme stands out and sticks to your head, just like the one in 'For the love of God', but the dynamics invoved are more subtle and elegant, in my opinion - here's the tune for those of you who don't know it yet:



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Kristofer Dahl
post Nov 15 2014, 11:42 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Nov 14 2014, 11:51 AM) *
I pretty much came to know where my vocal abilities and comfort zone are and when I am writing, I relate to that, while occasionally I am trying to push my limits with some new forms of vocal expression, plus since this summer I began expermenting with fry screaming in live contexts - it came out pretty well most of the times, but I still don't feel like I can pull it off top notch at command. The big problem is that I don't feel ok doing it at home without all that pump that surrounds me while I am onstage.


Yes good point there, I think it's very difficult to practice this kind of stuff unless you scream at a high volume.

Slightly off topic but I am not sure I am able to do classic screams and I don't know much about the theory behind it. I think of fry as Kurt Cobains type of screams and false cord more of James Hetfield type. My screaming influences are obvioulsy not growl/death metal inspired since I don't listen much to that kind of music.

By the way it's really cool you want keep developing your voice, do you have a specific sound or type of voice you are aiming for? I am also try to improve/alter my voice - but it's mostly about getting control of my clean voice.

If I ever do something good with that voice is completely random, if the music inspires me I might deliver some good lines and then I don't really know how I did it. For example, I am unable to record controlled clean background dubs/choir - even though I would really like to be able to..! Again, clean results are really random for me.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 16 2014, 01:30 PM
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Hey Kris! Great to be able to discuss these aspects with you, man!

Well, taking things one at a time - my idea of screaming is more related to aggressive music, indeed, but I dislike the idea of just screaming your way through a whole song and not singing at all. I like balance and I like vocalists that can blend singing with screaming in a nice flowing manner. If you have watched Melissa Cross' DVD - The Zen of Screaming, she talks about the 'Good Cop/ Bad Cop' concept. By that, she emphasizes the fact that a singer should be able to scream using notes and to put dirt in the singing in a lesser or greater amount, but avoiding singing and then screaming, by creating a definite line between the two techniques.

Daniel Tompkins from Tesseract is VERY skilled at this and I wrote him in respect to singing lesson focused on this aspect as well. If you are interested, you can check more out here: http://www.danieltompkinsvocalist.com/vocal-coaching/

As for a good fry sceaming example - Phil from All that remains is a perfect example:



He can also involve notes in his screaming - notice how it's not just a monotonous growl?

Anyway, I don't know if it's really your favorite thing, but it's a good technical example wink.gif

About my development as a vocalist - hmm, I am practicing various techniques in the contexts of songs and implementing them in my own lines - for instance, in some of our latest songs, I have been experimenting with abrupt changes between falsetto and speech level singing - such as this example - see around 0:28-0:29



Also, my pitch needs a bit of work in a live context, because of the lack of control in monitoring that I sometimes get (see my experience two nights ago, when the sound engineer didn't send my guitar in the in-ear.. awful, awful) and from the fact that sometimes, my guitar riffs are a bit complicated and I tend to lose my focus - it'll all come to me, but it needs work smile.gif

I am a big fan of dubbing and additional vocals - we experiment a lot with those in our songs usually - here's a little video from the gig we had:





And a more mellower one, as me and the vocalist from another band decided we wanted to have a little acoustic moment:



Pff, there's LOADS to talk around this, man smile.gif

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Nov 16 2014, 01:40 PM


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