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> Composer Vs Musician Logic
Mertay
post Dec 29 2014, 01:03 AM
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On a local guitar forum, someone opened a topic about hendrix and how is tone was effected by the lefty playing on right hand guitar (bridge pickup tilt) and ended his post by basically saying "don't try too hard copying technique or tone, apply their logic to find yours and make music"...then all hell broke loose biggrin.gif

Because someone answered him such approach is like a psychologic disorder, trying to be/think like someone else...

Then I commented this "empathy" is carried usually by people who approach to music more like a composer rather than a musician. What do you guys think?

This post has been edited by Mertay: Dec 29 2014, 10:30 PM


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klasaine
post Dec 29 2014, 03:07 AM
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QUOTE (Mertay @ Dec 28 2014, 05:03 PM) *
So a friend of mine joined a local guitar forum, opened a topic about hendirx and how is tone was effected by the lefty playing on right hand guitar (bridge pickup tilt) and ended his post by basically saying "don't try too hard copying technique or tone, apply their logic to find yours and make music"


I agree.
There's a lot of stuff about music/art that's just really personal. You hear guys all the time that can play all the licks (of whomever in all styles) but are not nearly as compelling or interesting ... or musical. We even say that such and such player is a _______ ______ clone.

Studying technique is important. Studying other players approaches is also important but you're never gonna sound exactly like whoever it is you're trying to emulate. And in fact the closer you get to said player the more lambasted you'll be for trying too hard to copy something that's already been done. Your friends and your family might think it's cool that you can play Eruption (or whatever) note for note but nobody else will.

Whatever you get from another player, whatever you 'steal' (and we need to learn, steal, absorb, etc.) ... let it filter through you. Allow it to become something else - yours.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 29 2014, 03:08 AM


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Mertay
post Dec 29 2014, 11:11 AM
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I don't know when it started but sometimes when I listen something I really like, I ask myself what sort of mood/thought or even experience would push me to write such melody/harmony...

I know it sounds spiritual but I don't see it that way, no matter how far as our musicianship (universal) goes its the decisions we make (personal) that gives character to what we play.

Probably a reason why I was never interested in practicing riffs but prefered boring exercises biggrin.gif


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Kristofer Dahl
post Dec 29 2014, 03:07 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 29 2014, 03:07 AM) *
I agree.
There's a lot of stuff about music/art that's just really personal. You hear guys all the time that can play all the licks (of whomever in all styles) but are not nearly as compelling or interesting ... or musical. We even say that such and such player is a _______ ______ clone.

Studying technique is important. Studying other players approaches is also important but you're never gonna sound exactly like whoever it is you're trying to emulate. And in fact the closer you get to said player the more lambasted you'll be for trying too hard to copy something that's already been done. Your friends and your family might think it's cool that you can play Eruption (or whatever) note for note but nobody else will.

Whatever you get from another player, whatever you 'steal' (and we need to learn, steal, absorb, etc.) ... let it filter through you. Allow it to become something else - yours.


Amen to this!

I think that to become great musicians, we have to try to forget all the little technical stuff we work so hard on, and take a step back to see the big picture.


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klasaine
post Dec 29 2014, 05:42 PM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Dec 29 2014, 07:07 AM) *
I think that to become great musicians, we have to try to forget all the little technical stuff we work so hard on, and take a step back to see the big picture.


Not so much 'forget' it but know it so well that it becomes part of you.


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Kristofer Dahl
post Dec 29 2014, 05:51 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 29 2014, 05:42 PM) *
Not so much 'forget' it but know it so well that it becomes part of you.


Yes, "stop focusing" would have been a better way to put it. Obviously ALL the things we have worked on will be useful one way or the other. But not until we stop thinking about them.


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klasaine
post Dec 29 2014, 06:02 PM
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As one of my teachers used to tell me, "practice the method, perform the result".


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Darius Wave
post Dec 29 2014, 06:17 PM
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Hard topic for sure. I think it's a bit heavy to explain especially when You're on beginner level. I think we all had that period of trying to be someone we admire. The question is did the way we explored all those other players made us sound like one of them or left just a little influence, heard in our playing. Worst is...we are not the one to judge ourself in this case. When I was a kid I would not have anything bad to sound exactly like Bettencourt or Gilbert. I do not know if I simply sound like one of them or is it just an influence to be find in a single licks yet I've never bothered to focus on what exaclty they do to set-up the tone. I didn't even focus on how they hold the pick, what angles etc. But I kew I was in love with those fast, palm muted runs, and I still do love to use them smile.gif Probably it's the question "what kind of version of Him I can create while being myslef"


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klasaine
post Dec 29 2014, 06:21 PM
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I guess it needs to be mentioned that all this stuff - absorbing, not just copying your heroes and influences - takes time ... like y e a r s of patience and study and practice and performance. IMO, it takes a solid 10 years to be competently mediocre. I mean that.


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SirJamsalot
post Dec 29 2014, 06:52 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 29 2014, 09:21 AM) *
I guess it needs to be mentioned that all this stuff - absorbing, not just copying your heroes and influences - takes time ... like y e a r s of patience and study and practice and performance. IMO, it takes a solid 10 years to be competently mediocre. I mean that.


yup. "they" say it takes 10,000 hours of practicing anything to become pro-ficient at it.
http://www.wisdomgroup.com/blog/10000-hours-of-practice/

Most of your guitar idols started at the ages of 9-14 -, making history by their early 20's. Doing the math, 10 years really isn't that long, but it sure feels like it when you're young. Don't think short-term when practicing. Think long-term.


Cheerios.


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Darius Wave
post Dec 29 2014, 06:58 PM
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QUOTE (SirJamsalot @ Dec 29 2014, 05:52 PM) *
Don't think short-term when practicing. Think long-term.


Cheerios.


That should go to the frame in the hall of fame wink.gif

Agree as hell \m/


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