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> Floyd Rose/springs Problem
Caelumamittendum
post Mar 10 2015, 03:11 PM
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I recently bought a new Floyd Rose for my Hamer, as the old one was in bad condition, however, after it arrived and after I had installed it, I encountered a bit of a problem. The springs in the back hit the wood edge at the cavity in the back when doing dives with the FR.

Anyone got a solution?

Here's a picture for a bit further detail:

Attached Image

EDIT: Don't mind the hairband, it was just there to minimize the springs from ringing wildly.

This post has been edited by Caelumamittendum: Mar 10 2015, 03:17 PM


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Mertay
post Mar 10 2015, 04:03 PM
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Interesting...you could adjust the neck pocket angle (neck to body angle) more straight so the floyd will be lowered to the body and spring problem can be solved (unless the angle is already as straight as possible). You might need a luthier for this if you're not experienced.

If not possible, you could stick something the where the springs are touching (like the tape electricians use) this can also work as a spring silencer.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Mar 10 2015, 04:04 PM


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Caelumamittendum
post Mar 10 2015, 05:49 PM
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QUOTE (Mertay @ Mar 10 2015, 04:03 PM) *
Interesting...you could adjust the neck pocket angle (neck to body angle) more straight so the floyd will be lowered to the body and spring problem can be solved (unless the angle is already as straight as possible). You might need a luthier for this if you're not experienced.

If not possible, you could stick something the where the springs are touching (like the tape electricians use) this can also work as a spring silencer.


I'm not entirely sure what you mean to be honest. Could you elaborate a bit or explain in a different way?



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Mertay
post Mar 10 2015, 05:57 PM
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QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Mar 10 2015, 04:49 PM) *
I'm not entirely sure what you mean to be honest. Could you elaborate a bit or explain in a different way?


No problem, its a bolt-on guitar right? so on bolt-on guitar we have the option to adjust how straight the neck is connected to the body. This picture should help;



So if possible, if the neck can be connected more parallel to the body than how it is right now, the floyd will be lowered to get the same string action/height. From picture; adjusting from 3rd example to first example.

But this is just a possibility, maybe its already adjusted like that so the second option is placing tape to where the springs touch...or (3rd option) a luthier can also cut that part of the wood so the springs won't touch, it wouldn't damage the guitar unless it has collectable value.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Mar 10 2015, 05:59 PM


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Chris S.
post Mar 10 2015, 09:40 PM
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Are you saying the springs are rubbing against the sides of the cavity?

If that's the case I'm guessing the new bridge has a different spacing for the springs than the original?

You can try moving the springs to a different hole and drive the claw screws in more to compensate - and if that doesn't work what I would do in that scenario would be slightly rout out the sides of the cavity so they no longer rub - but that's just me.



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Caelumamittendum
post Mar 10 2015, 11:35 PM
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QUOTE (Chris S. @ Mar 10 2015, 09:40 PM) *
Are you saying the springs are rubbing against the sides of the cavity?

If that's the case I'm guessing the new bridge has a different spacing for the springs than the original?

You can try moving the springs to a different hole and drive the claw screws in more to compensate - and if that doesn't work what I would do in that scenario would be slightly rout out the sides of the cavity so they no longer rub - but that's just me.


Well, not the sides, but the edge where the hole for the bridge is coming through.

I've thought about taking some sanding paper and fixing it myself, but that probably means the sell on value goes down, though with this problem there's not much of a sell on value either.


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Mertay
post Mar 11 2015, 01:08 AM
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QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Mar 10 2015, 10:35 PM) *
Well, not the sides, but the edge where the hole for the bridge is coming through.

I've thought about taking some sanding paper and fixing it myself, but that probably means the sell on value goes down, though with this problem there's not much of a sell on value either.


The bridge has been changed anyway so yeah I guess if you ever want to sell it even if the price doesn't go down you'll wait for someone who appreciate the changes.

A known Fender mod. (forgot which artist started it) is to sand that entire spring area (its called trem. cavity?) like this;

http://www.tdpri.com/forum/attachments/oth...-photo-copy-jpg

Its sanded so the wood of the guitar could further breath and dry as years pass since its not covered with paint anymore, now you have a better reason to sand+who knows maybe a few years later the resale value might go up biggrin.gif


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jstcrsn
post Mar 11 2015, 02:12 AM
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yes it would devalue it by sanding or chiseling(is what I did).When I modify a guitar it is because I want to keep it and will do everything to make it more playable for me,even to the extent of cutting off the horn so I could have better neck access(which I did), my question would be(hope this doesn't sound rude) now if you are not going to keep it ,why do you have it ?
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Caelumamittendum
post Mar 11 2015, 08:09 AM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Mar 11 2015, 02:12 AM) *
yes it would devalue it by sanding or chiseling(is what I did).When I modify a guitar it is because I want to keep it and will do everything to make it more playable for me,even to the extent of cutting off the horn so I could have better neck access(which I did), my question would be(hope this doesn't sound rude) now if you are not going to keep it ,why do you have it ?


I bought it on the cheap, hoping it would be a good guitar, as I lacked a 6 string. And while it is actually a good guitar, I've seen them being sold at twice what I paid. So I'm tempted to making a few bucks and have it go towards another guitar, trading my way up.

But on the other hand, I might just keep it, cause I quite like it!

QUOTE (Mertay @ Mar 11 2015, 01:08 AM) *
The bridge has been changed anyway so yeah I guess if you ever want to sell it even if the price doesn't go down you'll wait for someone who appreciate the changes.

A known Fender mod. (forgot which artist started it) is to sand that entire spring area (its called trem. cavity?) like this;

http://www.tdpri.com/forum/attachments/oth...-photo-copy-jpg

Its sanded so the wood of the guitar could further breath and dry as years pass since its not covered with paint anymore, now you have a better reason to sand+who knows maybe a few years later the resale value might go up biggrin.gif


Interesting. Worth considering!


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Todd Simpson
post Mar 12 2015, 05:47 AM
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WIth this kind of modification, it's it's done well, and looks good, it honestly shouldn't hurt the value of the axe. It's being done for tonal reasons, not for giggles or to make the guitar look different, like adding mirror pieces or something odd, so it's probably ok on that front smile.gif

With most of my guitars, I put them up for sale as some crazy high price and just wait. I sold the ESP Bella Lugossi for several hundred more than I paid for it and same goes for several others. Price it high and don't be in a hurry smile.gif If the right buyer sees it, you can make great profit and start looking for the next one.

Just make sure you buy every guitar at a price that is well below what you could sell it for, even in a rush. That way you can make money each time and move up the guitar chain smile.gif This is why I suggest folks avoid buying Brand New guitars typically as they lose value the second they leave the store. IF it's one you plan to be buried with, buy new if you like, if you may ever sell it, never buy it new. smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Mar 11 2015, 03:09 AM) *
I bought it on the cheap, hoping it would be a good guitar, as I lacked a 6 string. And while it is actually a good guitar, I've seen them being sold at twice what I paid. So I'm tempted to making a few bucks and have it go towards another guitar, trading my way up.

But on the other hand, I might just keep it, cause I quite like it!



Interesting. Worth considering!



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AK Rich
post Mar 14 2015, 06:42 PM
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QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Mar 10 2015, 06:11 AM) *
I recently bought a new Floyd Rose for my Hamer, as the old one was in bad condition, however, after it arrived and after I had installed it, I encountered a bit of a problem. The springs in the back hit the wood edge at the cavity in the back when doing dives with the FR.

Anyone got a solution?

Here's a picture for a bit further detail:

Attached Image

EDIT: Don't mind the hairband, it was just there to minimize the springs from ringing wildly.


Interesting. I think I would just take away some of the wood from under the springs with a dremel tool, or maybe swap the block on the new trem for the one on the old trem if it is taller and if it is possible.
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AK Rich
post Mar 14 2015, 07:15 PM
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QUOTE (Mertay @ Mar 10 2015, 08:57 AM) *
No problem, its a bolt-on guitar right? so on bolt-on guitar we have the option to adjust how straight the neck is connected to the body. This picture should help;



So if possible, if the neck can be connected more parallel to the body than how it is right now, the floyd will be lowered to get the same string action/height. From picture; adjusting from 3rd example to first example.

But this is just a possibility, maybe its already adjusted like that so the second option is placing tape to where the springs touch...or (3rd option) a luthier can also cut that part of the wood so the springs won't touch, it wouldn't damage the guitar unless it has collectable value.


I shimmed the neck on one of my guitars like the third picture to get a more consistent and low string action along the entire length of the fretboard. It worked beautifully and resulted in a much better playing guitar. smile.gif
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